Andrew Parrella

Production Manager

Andrew Parrella came to NHPR in 2007 and is our main producer of all on-air promotions and station imaging spots. He also produces our weekly feature/podcast Something Wild and works on special projects like election night coverage and StoryCorps. Most recently, Andrew has been spearheading the push to digitize NHPR's audio archive, and has been polishing and posting gems on the From The Archives blog. Parrella worked at WGBH Radio in Boston, filing stories for the Marketplace Health Desk and working on a number of news and documentary pilot projects. Before his radio career, Andrew spent the better part of a decade as a technician at theatres around New England from Burlington, Vermont to Matunuck, Rhode Island, including New Hampshire's own Palace Theatre.

Contact

Courtesy of The Raymond Coalition

The Raymond Coalition for Youth is committed to helping kids make healthy choices and form positive habits. Through its "Youth Action" program, the Coalition empowers teenagers, like Kirsten Roman, to involve themselves in community outreach. "I was really interested in helping out the community more, and to help my peers make good choices," says Roman. "We focus on positive choice: not doing drugs or alcohol; eating healthy and exercising."

epSos.de / Flickr/Creative Commons

Serenity Place is a substance abuse recovery center in Manchester, offering detox programs and education to those struggling to overcome addiction. For Stephanie, Serenity Place provided a solid foundation for her recovery from drug and alcohol problems.

The World Runs on Grass

Nov 29, 2013
Francie Von Mertens

Grass doesn't get a lot of appreciation aside from lawns and hayfields, but grasses play an essential role in ecosystem health. When soil is disturbed by hurricane, fire or logging, grasses take quick advantage of. Dormant seeds awaiting the right conditions sprout and up come the grasses.

Aldo Tapia / Flickr

MoCo Arts wants to change people's lives through creative expression and exposure to the arts. One of its students, Peter Fedrizzi, started dancing when he was 13, after a friend suggested he might have a natural ability for it.

"We were lying around one afternoon and I was stretching my feet, and she looked at them and said, 'Peter, people will kill for your feet in dance. You should try ballet.'"

Creative Common/Flickr audiolucistore

Professionals who dream of changing careers and becoming teachers have been doing so with the help of the Upper Valley Educators Institute since 1969.

Fewer Exotic Birds in NH This Winter

Nov 15, 2013

Fall migration has wrapped up for all but a few bird species. This semi-annual rite of passage typically follows predictable timetables and geographic routes. Exceptions to the rule, "irruptive" species, are northerners that head this way certain winters, driven out of their home territories by food scarcity.

Harbor Homes Supports Homeless Vets

Nov 9, 2013
Courtesy of Harbor Homes

When Matt Milbourn, a veteran of the first Persian Gulf War, found himself unexpectedly made homeless,  Harbor Homes was there for him.

In addition to operating a homeless shelter, Harbor Homes also manages a reintegration program, offering services, healthcare, and education to homeless veterans and their families. Matt earned his CphT (Certified Pharmacy Technician) through the program, and now teaches computer education and life skills classes at Harbor Homes.

NHPR

Big Brothers/Big Sisters Alliance of New Hampshire matches kids with caring mentors.

Lexi was matched with her "big sister" Sarah Danforth, and the two regularly spend time together. Lexi’s three sisters each have "big sisters," too. Sometimes, all eight of them get together--for a swim, for a cookout, for a game night.

Danforth joined the Big Brothers/Big Sisters program because she wanted to enable her match to see and do things she may not have an opportunity to otherwise.

Milestone Management / Flickr

The Granite United Way's 2-1-1 New Hampshire service is a directory assistance of services available in the state. It puts those in need in touch with the services that can help.

Cassie called 2-1-1 for help with disability rights when she ran into trouble with her housing arrangement. Her landlord had issued an eviction notice after she acquired a dog, because her lease forbids pets from the building. But Cassie's dog isn't a pet; she's a psychiatric service dog that provided therapeutic assistance.

Interviews at the StoryCorps Mobile Booth begin with a question, but the exciting part is the answer. Because, whether it’s from someone we know and love, or from someone we’ve just met, the answer tells us something we didn’t know.

StoryCorps is celebrating 10 years of recording the stories of average Americans. We thought it would be a good time to listen back to some of the stories we recorded when the StoryCorps Mobile Booth came to Concord in 2007, and Berlin in 2009.

 

Some years ago, Maria Dichtelmiller found herself unable to buy food and living in a shelter. She went to The Community Kitchen in Keene, a local food pantry.

While standing in line at the pantry, Maria noticed a chayote (a type of squash) had been sorted in with boxes of fruits. After pointing this out and explaining what a chayote was to the staff, they hired her as a volunteer. She now works at the Kitchen’s grain station and educates others on the value of food they might be unfamiliar with.

Sheryl Rich-Kern / NHPR

Symphony NH, the granite state's oldest professional orchestra, invited 16-year-old harpist Crystal Napoli to solo at two of their performances; an opportunity that is the stuff of dreams for young classical musicians.

The symphony's music director, Jonathan McPhee, extended the invitation to Crystal after seeing her performance as the 2011 winner of the concerto competition at the Manchester Community Music School.

hepingting / Flickr

Lakes Region Community Services helps children with autism and their families through their early intervention program and autism center. Christian Lapierre was 15 months old when his mom, Denise, realized something was wrong and called Lakes Region Community Services.

Scala

3S Artspace is a Portsmouth nonprofit working on renovating a large building into studio space for artists, a farm-to-table restaurant, performance space and a gallery. For Catherine Scala, finding studio space here gave her the boost to continue her career as an artist.

 

AMC Trains The Future Workforce

Sep 21, 2013
NHPR/MacNameeKing

The Appalachian Mountain Club works with Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG), providing summer work opportunities to North Country students. Students learn about trail stewardship and conservation, and gain practical job skills. Cory Arsenault and Samantha Roux were part of a crew doing trail work.

Roux says the trail work is intensive and demanding, “building rock staircases, bridges. We clean the trail 

  off for people.”

Pam Hunt; NH Audubon

We’re standing up to our shins in Turkey Pond, on a warm July morning with Pam Hunt, a biologist with New Hampshire Audubon who has spent the last five years organizing, in conjunction with NH Fish and Game, the New Hampshire Dragonfly Survey. Hunt trained about a hundred volunteers to gather data and help map the distribution of dragonflies across the state. 

One more reason to be thankful, New Hampshire: we did NOT experience the periodic cicada invasion this summer. You've likely heard about the mass synchronized emergence of billions of periodic cicadas this summer across the Eastern Seaboard from Virginia north to New Jersey, New York and as far as northern Connecticut - NOT New Hampshire.

Poetry In Life

Apr 28, 2013
spo0nman / Flickr/Creative Commons

We'll tackle couplets, stanzas, limericks, sonnets, odes, dirges; free or rhyming verse of any meter. From the epic to the cursory, from the aggressive to the  consolatory, we’re all about poetry today.

The summit of New Hampshire’s highest mountain is, of course, known for the “worst weather in the world.” But we learned late last week that the summit of Mount Washington is also home to some of the greatest questions in the world.

"This mountain is man made, isn't it?"
"Which of those mountains out there is Everest?"
"Is this named after the state of Washington?"
"What percentage of people who come up here die?"

Fitting and Proper

Apr 20, 2012

It’s been said that poetry is all that is worth remembering in life. We asked folks to tell us about their memories of how a poem had affected their life. Rodger Martin from Harrisville, New Hampshire remembered hearing a poem that helped him return to civilian life after a tour of duty in Vietnam.

RODGER: The state of the country was in a far different place in 1970.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/lanier67/4691811080/in/photostream/" target="blank">lanier67</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

For Valentine's Day, we listen in on a few love stories from New Hampshire, stories about the many unusual places love can take us.

Stone Walls Make Good Fences

Dec 12, 2009
Lorianne DiSabato via Flickr/Creative Commons

  New England's distinctive stone walls are estimated to stretch 240,000 miles, the distance from Earth to the Moon. Though the layout seems maze-like, there was a method behind the construction. And with winter's reduced foliage, now is an especially good time to take a closer look. 

 

A homesteading family worked the land in four ways, each requiring different precision of sifting of the land.

Pages