Associated Press

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Some landlords aren't happy with changes to a bill aimed at reducing the hazard that lead paint poses to children's health.

The House Finance Committee last week recommended passage of a bill that would require health care providers to offer lead testing to all children age 2 and younger. The bill would also lower the threshold necessary to trigger mandatory action by landlords to remove harmful sources of lead.

The Concord Monitor reports that the bill will head to the full House in January with an amendment that many property owners oppose.

jimmywayne / Flickr Creative Commons

A University of New Hampshire alumnus has pledged more than $2 million of his estate to students at the College of Engineering and Physical Sciences, ensuring that several students will receive free tuition every year.

The scholarship from Bob Winot will be awarded to New Hampshire or Vermont students who demonstrate financial need and have a grade point average of 3.0 or higher. It's estimated to benefit as many as four students a year.

Doc Searls / Flickr Creative Commons

A sewage treatment plant in North Andover, Massachusetts, lost power during the powerful wind storm and spilled 8 million gallons of untreated waste into the Merrimack River.

North Andover Town Manager Andrew Maylor said Tuesday a pump failed to move waste into the treatment plant because of the power outage. That allowed waste to back up and flow in the river.

He says there was backup power for the sewage treatment plant, but not the pump outside the plant.

Beancounter603 / Wikimedia Commons

Officials in the New Hampshire town of Exeter continue to discuss renovation plans for the town's public library.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Exeter Public Library trustees presented a revised proposal to the Board of Selectmen during a meeting Monday night. Under the estimated $5 million plan, the library would create more study spaces, expand existing rooms and add energy-efficient heating and cooling systems.

New Hampshire's Democratic U.S. senators are reminding residents that open enrollment starts Wednesday under the Affordable Care Act, and that they object to the Trump administration's efforts to dismantle the health care law.

Via Dartmouth.edu

Dartmouth College's head football coach is apologizing after an assistant coach punched a press box window at Harvard Stadium, spreading shards of broken glass on spectators, after his team fumbled a punt against Harvard.

One spectator was reportedly injured in the incident Saturday.

Dartmouth Head Coach Buddy Teevens released a statement after the game saying Assistant Coach Dion King "let his emotions get the best of him." Teevans said "Dion and Dartmouth Football are terribly sorry for his actions and any harm caused by them."

A plan to significantly expand a wildlife refuge that covers parts of the Connecticut River watershed in New England is running into opposition from the timber industry and governors in several states.

A New Hampshire woman has filed a federal lawsuit against gun manufacturer Sig Sauer claiming she was fired after she reported an unlawful shipment of firearms.

The Portsmouth Herald reports Patricia Hall-Cloutier filed the lawsuit alleging a violation of whistleblower protection, wrongful termination and Family Medical Leave Act retaliation.

Hall-Cloutier says in her lawsuit she worked for the Newington company as a compliance director. She says she noticed in June someone had manually changed the recipient of a shipment of weapons.

Selbe B via Flickr/CC

Three years after the Keene Pumpkin Festival ended because of violence, organizers say this weekend's revamped event will feature far fewer jack-o'-lanterns, but many more "life lessons."

Over its more than 20-year history, the downtown festival had broken world records for the most lit jack-o'-lanterns in one place. But it was cancelled after parties near Keene State College led to injuries, property damage and more than 100 arrests.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/partiallyblind/1164043991/in/photostream/" target="blank">partiallyblind</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

An immigrant from Brazil who lives in New Hampshire and faces deportation Nov. 5 is fighting for his case to be heard, saying federal officials aren't honoring a nearly 15-year-old agreement allowing him to stay in the U.S.

Fifty-eight-year-old Renato Filippi entered the U.S. through Mexico in 2002 with the help of smugglers. He was arrested but says U.S. authorities recruited him to serve as a confidential informant on the people who assisted with his entry. He says he was promised he could stay in the U.S. permanently.

C. Hanchey via Flickr CC

The mayor of a New Hampshire city has proposed a new law that would require people suing the city to disclose how their lawsuits are financed.

Nashua Mayor Jim Donchess presented the ordinance Tuesday night before the Board of Aldermen. The Nashua Telegraph reports the ordinance applies to anyone bringing an action against the board or challenging any city ordinance or charter provision.

The law would require the person bringing the lawsuit and paying legal bills through donations to disclose all donors.

Richard Bartz / Wikimedia Commons

Officials have shut down a New Hampshire playground after it appears to have become infested by yellow jackets.

WMUR-TV reports the wasps can be seen all over the Portsmouth Plains Playground, which is now closed as of Tuesday. Portsmouth Recreation Director Russ Wilson says they almost had to cancel a nearby high school soccer game because one of the teams complained wasps were flying around the field.

NHPR Staff

New Hampshire is sending off 17 tractor trailers' worth of food, bottles of water, and hygiene products to Puerto Rico, which is still recovering from devastating hurricanes.

Republican Gov. Chris Sununu said Tuesday the donations will be trucked to New Jersey, where they will then be loaded onto a barge and shipped down to Puerto Rico. The items are due to arrive on Nov. 2.

State employees and AmeriCorps members gathered and packed the goods after conducting a drive Oct. 3-4.

justgrimes / Flickr Creative Commons

Despite unseasonably warm weather, some New Hampshire lawmakers remain worried about snow.

A snowstorm prompted dozens of towns to delay their March 14 elections, creating confusion and raising concerns about one state law requiring towns to hold annual elections on the second Tuesday in March, and another law allowing town moderators to move the "voting day of a meeting" in the event of a weather emergency.

Brady Carlson for NHPR

Former New Hampshire state Supreme Court Justice John Broderick, who is part of a mental health awareness initiative, is teaming up with Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut to address a high school in their first joint appearance.

Residents of a Vermont nursing home are looking for new places to live after learning the facility is closing at the end of November.

The Valley News reports that Brookside Health and Rehabilitation Center in White River Junction notified residents Wednesday, five days after the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced it would end payments for patient care at the 67-bed facility.

Via USGS.gov

Senate Democrats from New Hampshire have sent a letter to the regional Environmental Protection Agency office raising questions about its determination that a controversial landfill did not pose an "unacceptable human health risk."

The EPA made the ruling about the Coakley landfill last month and announced it wasn't recommending remediation of chemicals on the site. The landfill in Greenland and North Hampton is a federal Superfund site and residents have expressed concerns that their wells could be contaminated.

A New Hampshire House committee has rejected the late filing of a bill that would have banned so-called "bump stocks" like the ones used by the Las Vegas gunman to mimic the action of fully automatic guns.

Democratic Rep. Steve Shurtleff, of Concord, proposed the bill to ban the devices that helped Stephen Paddock kill 58 and wound hundreds in Las Vegas. He sought permission to introduce it, even though the Sept. 22 deadline already had passed.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire Gov. Chris Sununu has removed a member of the Seacoast Cancer Cluster Commission who wrote an op-ed piece saying there is no cancer cluster.

Sununu said Tuesday he's removed Steve Kenda of North Hampton, a past Republican candidate for state Senate and governor, from the commission. He said Kenda's participation has become too much of a distraction.

Police say an 18-year-old man heading to a drag racing event in New Hampshire has been charged with negligent homicide in the Interstate 95 death of an off-duty Massachusetts police officer on a motorcycle earlier this month.

A police affidavit says Michael Ricci, of Burlington, Massachusetts, collided with the officer's bike head-on on Oct. 8. after his car went through a closed crossover.

Police say Officer Louis Remigio, of Somerville, Massachusetts, flipped over the front of his bike and landed on the road. He died the next day. Ricci wasn't hurt.

Sam Evans-Brown

A New Hampshire judge is deciding if a defamation case brought by the mayor of the state's largest city can move forward.

Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas is suing a former alderman and a critic, saying he was defamed by their accusations that he covered up a sexual assault at a high school. WMUR-TV reports that lawyers for the men who're being sued argued Monday that the complaint should be tossed.

A letter the men sent to the City Council claimed Gatsas tried to cover up the sexual assault in 2015 because it occurred weeks before the election.

United States Fish and Wildlife Service / Wikimedia Commons

A commission studying the potential impact of legalizing, regulating and taxing marijuana for recreational use in New Hampshire is starting its work.

The Legislature created the commission earlier this year, and it will hold its first meeting on Tuesday. Members include lawmakers, representatives from several state agencies and industries, including banking, law enforcement and the medical community.

Meredith Lee | The HSUS

Former employees of New Hampshire dog breeder Christina Fay say her home's floors were covered in dog urine and feces, and an officer says the property was such a mess it looked like it had been burglarized when 84 Great Danes were seized in June.

Fay has pleaded not guilty to 12 misdemeanor animal cruelty charges. She went on trial Monday, four months after the animals were removed from her Wolfeboro mansion.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

New Hampshire authorities are warning residents about a scam involving demands for payment for traffic violations.

Authorities say a fake email that appears to come from the New Hampshire Department of Motor Vehicles notifies recipients that they have been cited for traffic violations, demands payment of fines within 72 hours and includes links to pay online.

File photo

A soup kitchen and shelter in New Hampshire will soon be one of the first in the Northeast to be powered by solar energy.

New Hampshire police say they've arrested seven people in an ongoing effort to break up the drug trade in Nashua.

A Massachusetts state trooper accused of beating a suspect in New Hampshire following a 50-mile pursuit in 2016 has been acquitted.

A jury issued the verdict Thursday afternoon, bringing an end to the trial in Nashua. Thirty-three-year-old Joseph Flynn was found not guilty on both counts of simple assault.

Flynn's attorneys say they are grateful for the jury's decision and say Flynn will likely begin the process of being reinstated as a state trooper in Massachusetts.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A committee appointed by Republican Gov. Chris Sununu in hopes of making New Hampshire more business-friendly is starting its work.

Sununu, who called New Hampshire a "regulatory police state" during his campaign, last month appointed a regulatory reform steering committee to conduct in-depth reviews of state regulations and recommend changes.

Tomwsulcer / Wikimedia Commons

A bill authored by Sens. Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire and Susan Collins of Maine that would establish a national commission of health care experts on diabetes care and prevention is headed to President Donald Trump's desk.

Shaheen, a Democrat, and Collins, a Republican, say the legislation would bring together public and private sector experts, clinical endocrinologists and others involved in diabetes research and treatment to focus on improving education, care delivery and patient outcomes.

The bill has passed the House; it passed the Senate in September.

JB The Milker / Panoramio Creative Commons

A state-owned bridge in New Hampshire is getting a new set of lights, five years after going dark.

The Scammell Bridge carries Route 4 traffic over the Bellamy River. It spans Dover and Durham.

The state had paid about $7,000 a year to light the span, but that responsibility eventually fell to Durham and Dover, where residents opposed the idea.

A Dover business, Affinity LED Lighting bought and installed 51 lights on the bridge and another, brighter light in the parking lot on the Durham side.

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