Brady Carlson

Reporter and Host, Weekend Edition

Brady Carlson’s latest role at NHPR is actually two roles: reporting for NHPR’s news team, while also hosting Weekend Edition on Saturdays and Sundays.

It’s the latest stop on an NHPR career that has included a little bit of everything since he joined the station in 2005. As NHPR’s webmaster, he led NHPR.org's expansion into an Edward R. Murrow award-winning platform for online discussions and multimedia content, and he launched many of NHPR’s Facebook pages and Twitter feeds, as well as the station's Public Insight Network.

While serving as All Things Considered host for four years, he interviewed presidential hopefuls, authors, state lawmakers and other notable Granite Staters, while helping to add weekly segments such as Foodstuffs, Granite Geek and New England Snapshot. He’s guest hosted The Exchange, served as a frequent guest on Word of Mouth and helped to anchor NHPR’s election and primary night coverage.

In addition to his NHPR work, Brady is finishing up his first book, a tour of the gravesites of the U.S. presidents, which is set for publication in 2016.

Brady holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from Emerson College in Boston and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Science from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois. He and his wife, Sonya, live in Concord with their sons Owen and Wyatt.

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Raj Patel, Sherry Turkle, Bruce Levine, Tyler Cowen and Eliza Griswold...oh, my! We smack a big red bow on our 11 for '11 series of conversations with big thinkers, analyze their predictive powers, and talk about their spheres of influence.  How  

We also look at some folks who, in retrospect, should have made the list, like leading edge tweeter Evan Hill, and music critic and retro-downer Simon Reynolds

Voluntary Amputation via Flickr/Creative Commons - http://www.flickr.com/photos/photopunk13/565984437/in/photostream/

This week officials with Amtrak’s Downeaster marked ten years in service.

The train line between Portland, Maine and Boston includes several stops in New Hampshire. Ridership is up and there are plans to expand the service next year.

Peter Griffin is president of the New Hampshire Railroad Revitalization Association. He tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about the Downeaster's ten years in service.

From this Friday forward, Here's What's Awesome will bring you a fresh meme from the depths of web culture. This week, Misleading Doctor - who sets you up with a little news at the top of the image, only to turn that news on its head at the bottom of the image.

Local food with a capital L: New York-based Brightfarms builds greenhouses on top of grocery stores and warehouses. So if the cucumber section is running low, just run upstairs and you're good.

The system is designed to save the grocer money - if the veggies are on your roof, shipping costs go down, and the food is fresher, with a longer shelf life, meaning storage costs go down too.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/gwilmore/1394399144/in/photostream/" target="blank">gwilmore</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

Every since I was a young boy, I played the... gumball? The Gumball Pinball Machine is a real-life mashup of two iconic machines - turn the gumball machine handle and three candies roll onto a baseball-themed pinball board.

Sadly, losing a ball doesn't mean snack time - it goes back into the rotation.

On a slightly related note, I found what may be the world's greatest pinball dance while writing this column. If the lighting had been better, total meme fodder. Dancing Pinball Player never tilts!

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/nuttz/243256328/in/photostream/" target="blank">Jim Nutt</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

The hospital delivery room is not a fun place for surprises - the more parents and medical staff know going in, the better the outcome usually is. The Predibirth system helps keep surprises to a minimum by MRI-scanning Junior in the womb* and running virtual simulations of labor - if it sees a potentially serious problem, like baby's head being bigger than expected, doctors can consider planning a c-section in advance.

flickr by liewcf

Here’s a story worth sharing on your smartphone: new research says there is NOT an epidemic of teen sexting.

Janis Wolak is senior researcher at the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire. She’s co-author of two studies on sexting being released in today’s edition of the journal Pediatrics, and she tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson the UNH data shows a rate of sexting much lower than the 20 percent number commonly cited in news reports.

Each year the Business and Industry Association of New Hampshire surveys business owners to guage the state’s economic climate and what’s on the minds of business owners.

Some participants in the Occupy New Hampshire protests are heading to Washington DC to take part in what’s being called “Take Back the Capitol.”

Krista Rand of Suncook says she’ll be there. The unemployed civil engineer wants Congress to promote jobs in her field by putting more federal dollars toward roads and bridges. “We all know that the state of our infrastructure in this country is quite abysmal. The American Society of Civil Engineers rates our infrastructure a D, and our bridges a C, so that’s really a problem," she said.

Photo by Tom Maglieri, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

PART 1

 “Clean coal,” refers to technologies that reduce heavy metal, carbon and other emissions from the burning of coal. The development of technologies that could, potentially, filter greenhouse gases and store CO2 permanently is moving ahead. “Carbon Sequestration” is an important step in testing the potential of clean coal technology. We spoke with Maggie Koerth-Baker, Science Editor for Boing-Boing; she visited a carbon sequestration demonstration in Alabama.

plus

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/cc_chapman/4878972642/in/photostream/" target="blank">CC Chapman</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

The University of New Hampshire football team is back in the playoffs. It’s the eighth straight playoff appearance for Wildcat Football.

Allen Lessels has been following the team for the New Hampshire Union Leader. He previews the Wildcats' game against Montana State with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson.

Word of Mouth's Awesomator Brady Carlson is back with his latest super cool round-up from the world of the web.

BRADY'S AWESOME LINKS:

Pepper Spray Cop is a Meme...

10 things Siri will help you get instead of an abortion...

The State House has voted 240-139 to sustain Governor John Lynch's veto on so-called "right to work" bill.

Stay with NHPR and NHPR.org for details throughout the day.

Word of Mouth’s internet sherpa Brady Carlson is back. After his weekday shifts hosting All Things Considered, Brady likes to unwind by gathering new items for Here's What’s Awesome, our frequent look at the web and its endless list of memes, trends and viral hits.

New Hampshire’s Immigration Story includes the stories of many refugees, people who come to the United States because they can't stay in their native countries, due to violence or famine.

Many of those refugees are resettled in Manchester, but the city’s mayor, Ted Gatsas, says that needs to change. He wants a moratorium on new placements to avoid straining city services.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/partiallyblind/1164043991/in/photostream/" target="blank">partiallyblind</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

H-1B visas help employers find skilled workers they can’t find in the US workforce.

Something else that’s hard to come by these days for some businesses is credit.

Turns out there’s a visa program for that too. Foreigners can apply for an EB-5 visa, as long as they agree to invest a half million dollars or more in capital investment project for an American company.

Photo by Evan Hahn, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

NHPR's host of All Things Considered and resident web-guru pilots us through the interweb's latest viral videos and telling finds.  

HERE'S WHAT'S AWESOME THIS TIME:

Herman Cain's webpage "error"

How to win a Russian election

courtesy New Hampshire High Tech Council

A planetarium on your flat-screen monitor. Streaming music from an iPad all over the house. And a germ-fighting mask for health care first responders dealing with an outbreak of disease.

Those are some a few of the finalists in the New Hampshire High Tech Council’s Product of the Year award, which will be presented tonight at an event in Manchester.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

"If I would've finished that flight I would have come home to sell war bonds," says Herman "Herk" Streitburger of Bedford.  That last flight did not go as planned; instead, the B24 Liberator Bomber on which he served as gunner was shot down, and as he puts it, Herk became a guest of the German government for about a year.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/auvet/4864672208/in/photostream/" target="blank">jimmywayne</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

The phrase “first in the nation” is the shorthand we use for talking about the New Hampshire presidential primary coming before any other.

New Hampshire is first among states in other ways, too. Some are good – like having the lowest rate of child poverty among states. Some are not so good – like having the highest student debt load in America.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/niteseeker/69962792/in/photostream/">Melinda Taber</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

Ever used one of those machines at the gym where you can place your hands on the grips and it'll track your heart rate? German scientists - probably the ones who spend a lot of time working out  - wondered if they could put those sensors in the steering wheel of a car to detect driver stress.

Voters are going to the polls in 11 New Hampshire cities, to elect mayors, city councilors and school board members.

To get an overview, we turn to Todd Selig, town administrator in Durham and an avid municipal election watcher.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/niteseeker/69962792/in/photostream/" target="blank">Melinda Taber</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

Ever used one of those machines at the gym where you can place your hands on the grips and it'll track your heart rate? German scientists - probably the ones who spend a lot of time working out  - wondered if they could put those sensors in the steering wheel of a car to detect driver stress.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/doggie52/3597226869/in/photostream/" target="blank">Doggie52</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

The atomic clock is so accurate that, had it been running since the Big Bang, 13+ billion years ago, it would only be off of "real" time by four seconds.

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology want to build a nuclear clock that, when asked for comment on the atomic clock's accuracy, shrugs and says, "that's totally b-list."

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/doggie52/3597226869/in/photostream/">Doggie52</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

The atomic clock is so accurate that, had it been running since the Big Bang, 13+ billion years ago, it would only be off of "real" time by four seconds.

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology want to build a nuclear clock that, when asked for comment on the atomic clock's accuracy, shrugs and says, "that's totally b-list."

herzogbr / Flickr/Creative Commons

Yesterday we talked to the poet laureate of Rochester, who’s been preserving the voices of people who worked at city’s giant factory buildings.

Today we talk with a resident of Manchester who’s preserving the history of the buildings themselves.

Fifty years ago the city of Rochester was home to giant shoe factories. Hundreds of workers made a living working with leather and handling huge machines.

Rochester’s shoe factory era may be gone, but the city’s poet laureate wants to make sure it’s not forgotten.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/wmjas/148141867/in/photostream/">Wm Jas</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

Swear jars are designed to help you put the brakes on your potty mouth - every time you say a bad word, you put a quarter in, and I guess you throw yourself a profanity-free party with the results. The Twitter equivalent is Digital SwearJar, which scours your Twitter feed for cussing; users pledge to send a set amount per outburst to a charity that helps people affected by the famine in East Africa. So if you're an actor in a David Mamet film, you're golden

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/laffy4k/403048730/in/photostream/">laffy4k</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

I remember when Lucky Charms cereal added purple horseshoes to their menagerie of marshmallowy shapes, which speaks to either my vivid long-term memory or my sheltered upbringing.

Anyway, I mention this because inventor Tom Lombardi has developed a Lucky Charms Sifter to weed out those crunchy pieces and leave you with a bowl of nothing but sweet, sweet charms. It's one of the many nifty little devices people are developing using 3D printers these days, a few of which don't involve cereal

Fans of NotAlwaysRight.com will enjoy the Twitter handle @GuestsFromHELL, a collection of purportedly real quotes from real tourists in New York City.  You'll note that I use the word "real" in the vein of "someone really just asked that question?"

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