Brady Carlson

Host, All Things Considered

Along with hosting All Things Considered each afternoon, Brady co-hosts NHPR’s presence on Twitter and Facebook, and maintains NHPR’s Public Insight Network, working with residents around New Hampshire to use their knowledge and insights to inform news coverage. Brady is a frequent guest on Word of Mouth, discussing internet culture, media and technology in the regular Here's What's Awesome segment.

In addition to his radio career, Brady has been a public librarian, an overnight stock clerk, a community theater director, a custodian, a schoolteacher, a warehouse laborer, an adjunct college professor, an office receptionist and a walking billboard at a plastics industry trade show.

Brady holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from Emerson College in Boston and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Science from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois.

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Foodstuffs
6:00 pm
Wed December 11, 2013

Chocolate: The Sweet Science

For many of us the science of chocolate begins and ends with that great literary and cinematic candyman, Willy Wonka, who insisted chocolate was only best when it was churned by waterfall.

Of course, Wonka lived in the world of pure imagination, but the science of chocolate is pretty interesting in this world as well, as a group of Granite Staters found out in a recent "Science on Tap" event in Manchester.

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All Things Considered
5:12 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

New Hampshire MTBE Testing, Cleanup Initiative Getting Underway

New Hampshire’s program to clean up MTBE contamination is getting underway.

The Executive Council has approved funding for an Remediation Bureau, which will begin testing wells and water sources for MTBE contamination. The gasoline additive was intended to help the state address air pollution, but it was banned in 2007, years after the state began seeking damages from companies that produced and marketed gasoline with MTBE because of its effects on groundwater.

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Foodstuffs
6:07 pm
Thu December 5, 2013

Better Tourism Through Cookies

Cookies. No more needs to be said.
Credit Brady Carlson

All this month Foodstuffs is looking at baking – something many of us do around this time of year. And we’ll meet a range of people who bake at the holidays for a range of different reasons. For some innkeepers and bed and breakfast operators in the White Mountains, baking cookies is good for tourism.

That’s the idea behind the annual Inn to Inn Holiday Cookie and Candy Tour, which takes place December 14th and 15th.

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All Things Considered
5:16 pm
Tue December 3, 2013

Lots Of Conditions To Consider In N.H. Judicial Branch's 'E-Court'

New Hampshire’s judicial system is going digital with a new system called eCourt. The system is launching pilot programs in parts of New Hampshire in 2014 - but don’t expect a big rollout like what the White House did for HealthCare.gov.

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Foodstuffs
6:02 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

Meet Portsmouth's New 'Beer Master'

New Hampshire’s food system is growing and changing, and that means old jobs are evolving. Farmers, for example, are doing marketing and media along with planting and harvesting. And there are new jobs in the food system as well, including this one: Hotel Beer Master.

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How We Work: 5 Years Later
5:52 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

'Budget Certainty': What New Hampshire Defense Contractors Want

New Hampshire’s economy as a whole is affected by what happens across the country and around the world, but the defense industry, a major economic driver in southern New Hampshire, sees the effects of national decision making up close.

Like many industries, defense has seen plenty of change over the past five years. But because of the ongoing budget debates in Washington, there’s likely more change to come for the industry and for its workers.

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How We Work: 5 Years Later
5:01 pm
Tue November 19, 2013

As The Job Market Changes, So Does The College Career Services Office

With new calls for accountability and transparency on placement numbers and returns on investment, colleges are working to ensure that students see their degrees – and the money they put toward them – as worthwhile, not only in the programs and courses they offer, but in the services students can use to find meaningful work.

The career services office has been a longtime fixture on most campuses, but what goes on in that office is changing as the job market becomes more complex – and, for many, more challenging.

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How We Work: 5 Years Later
5:16 pm
Mon November 18, 2013

Post-Recession Economy Will Likely Include More 'Underemployment'

Economic forecasts for New Hampshire have repeatedly predicted slow but steady job growth, for the US as a whole and for New Hampshire. A report last week suggested that the state won’t reach its pre-recession job level until spring of 2014.

But the number of jobs isn’t the whole story of how we work in New Hampshire, five years after the start of the Great Recession. Many workers who want full-time jobs can only find part time employment.

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Foodstuffs
1:46 pm
Thu November 14, 2013

Could Drones Help Protect Apple Orchards From Disease?

UNH doctoral student Matt Wallhead (left) and assistant professor of plant pathology Kirk Broders, with their unmanned aerial vehicle.
Credit Rachel Rohr / Courtesy UNH

One of the challenges apple growers face is a fungal disease known as apple scab. New research at the University of New Hampshire might yield a better approach to preventing its spread – an approach, by the way, that includes the use of special imaging cameras mounted on unmanned aerial vehicles, also known as UAV’s or drones.
 

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All Things Considered
4:51 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

Tomie de Paola Reflects On Art And Life "Then"

A postcard for the exhibition "Tomie de Paola: Then" shows the artist holding up an early painting.

Writer and artist Tomie de Paola is perhaps best known for his books about the "grandma witch" Strega Nona and her magic pasta pot.

The inspiration for this character came to de Paola in an unusual place: a faculty meeting at Colby-Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire.

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Foodstuffs
5:34 pm
Thu November 7, 2013

What Portsmouth's Chefs Learned From The Man Who Made It A Food Hotspot

Credit Squirrel Flight via Flickr/Creative Commons: http://www.flickr.com/photos/squirrelflight/1355544138/in/photostream/

Portsmouth has long been considered one of the state’s food hotspots, and with Restaurant Week Portsmouth getting underway, we thought it was a good time to check in on Portsmouth’s food scene - a scene that got a huge boost in the 1970's from a chef called James Haller, who founded the Blue Strawbery restaurant.

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All Things Considered
5:14 pm
Wed November 6, 2013

High Court Will Compare Addison Death Penalty To "Similar Cases"

The New Hampshire Supreme Court has issued its ruling in the case of the only man on death row in the state - Michael Addison, who was convicted in 2008 of capital murder for shooting and killing Manchester Police Officer Michael Briggs.

To explain the ruling we turn to Buzz Scherr, law professor at the University of New Hampshire School of Law.  He speaks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson.

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All Things Considered
5:45 pm
Tue November 5, 2013

A Look At The Police Investigation Into Nashua's Mayor And Her Husband

Credit City of Nashua

There are new details about the police investigation of Nashua Mayor Donnalee Lozeau and her husband, including allegations of bid-rigging, kickbacks and drug use.

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All Things Considered
4:58 pm
Thu October 31, 2013

A Vampire Novel Featuring New Hampshire's Colonial Governor

Vampire novels are big these days, but here’s one with a few twists: for one thing, part of the book takes place in 19th century Portsmouth.

And the lead vampire is named for the colonial governor of New Hampshire.

The book is called The Vampire Benning Wentworth and the End of Times, and it's written by Paul Jesep, a columnist, a former resident of Portsmouth and an ordained Orthodox priest.

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All Things Considered
5:17 pm
Wed October 30, 2013

Nashua Mayor Alleges Police "Smear Campaign" Related To Contract Dispute

Nashua Mayor Donnalee Lozeau
Credit City of Nashua

The mayor of Nashua, Donnalee Lozeau, says the city police department, led by Chief John Seusing, have investigated her and her husband, David Lozeau, partly over contentious negotiations on a new police labor contract.

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Foodstuffs
3:40 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

In Which A Man Named Mario Finds And Eats A Giant Mushroom

Mario Mollica says hen of the woods mushrooms mimic the look of the oak trees around which they grow.
Credit thegardenbuzz via Flickr/CC - http://www.flickr.com/photos/thegardenbuzz/5037450393/in/photostream/

When we say giant mushroom, we mean it - a two foot long, 30 pound mushroom found in Salem.

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Foodstuffs
5:27 pm
Thu October 3, 2013

Inside The Traditional New England Church Bean Supper

Bean suppers are a traditional part of New England food.
Credit lynn.gardner via Flickr/CC - http://www.flickr.com/photos/grandgrrl/3357596727/in/photolist-67GywK-exGGoJ-exDuSx-exGGhh-exDuX8-exGG2q-67Gyw8-exGG9S-cPneUY-5wQkFS-7A7gmP-6YEa91-8HTFkt-8JCqPh-7xuzf2-4eeMcC-a25S97-dmHoJs-dmHo3w-dmHmdX-8JCqjw-8JCqoy-8JznKn-5x

New Hampshire food has been moving in plenty of new directions lately, but some old traditions are carrying on in this part of the country too, including the church bean supper.

Susan Laughlin is food editor for New Hampshire Magazine; she took part in a supper in Boscawen and wrote about the experience in the October issue. She talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about what she expected to see at the dinner and what she found instead.

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All Things Considered
5:45 pm
Mon September 30, 2013

Your Comments: On Dress Codes, Veteran Job Fairs, And Poetry

Time again for some of your comments, and we got quite a few about a story from reporter Michael Brindley about a proposed dress code at Pinkerton Academy in Derry.

True Ricker was one of several people on our Facebook page who opposed the new clothes, saying

"Next up, making girls kneel to show their skirts are long enough, a-la 1970.”

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All Things Considered
5:10 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

N.H. Teacher Of The Year Wants To Prepare Students For A Changing World

Pinkerton Academy teacher Joe Lee (left) was named 2014 New Hampshire Teacher of the Year.
Credit NHPR / Michael Brindley

Today New Hampshire’s Education Commissioner Virginia Barry announced the winner of the 2014 New Hampshire Teacher of the Year award.

Joe Lee teaches social studies at Pinkerton Academy in Derry; he also coaches the school's golf and hockey teams, and serves as advisor to the China exchange program.

He spoke about the award and his job with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson.

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All Things Considered
4:53 pm
Fri September 27, 2013

GraniteCon Turns 10, With Help From A DeLorean And Imperial Stormtroopers

A Ghostbuster and a Captain Jack Sparrow from GraniteCon 2012.
Credit Ryan Lessard, NHPR

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the Granite State Comicon, also known as GraniteCon.

The annual gathering has come a long way - just as in many other places, it started small, and grew to the point that, for the first time, this year's GraniteCon will be a two day extravaganza, including costumes, comics, artists, actors, video game tournaments, even a time-traveling Delorean from the movie "Back To The Future 3."

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All Things Considered
5:37 pm
Tue September 24, 2013

Keene State College Prof Uncovers A Lost Gem From Hollywood's Early Days

Mary Pickford stars in "Their First Misunderstanding," a 1911 short film believed lost. A copy of the film turned up in a barn in Nelson, N.H., and Keene State College took part in the process to restore the film.
Credit Courtesy Keene State College/Library of Congress

We use the phrase “long lost” more often than is probably warranted, but this story certainly qualifies.

Several years ago a contractor was cleaning out a barn in Nelson that he’d been hired to demolish. He found a 35 millimeter film projector and seven reels of nitrate film. Among those was a short film that had not been seen in decades. The film, called “Their First Misunderstanding,” stars an 18 year old woman named Mary Pickford, who would become one of Hollywood’s first and biggest stars.

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All Things Considered
5:40 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

'Domestic Migration' Picks Up In New Hampshire As Recession's Effects Recede

Newly released data from the US Census Bureau says Americans are on the move again – the country’s rate of domestic migration in 2012 hit a five-year high.

The story of migration in northern New England, however, is slightly more complicated. According to the results of the latest American Community Survey, New Hampshire saw a rise in migration after several years of decline. But Massachusetts and Maine saw decline.

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All Things Considered
5:26 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Your Comments: On Health Care, Bridges And Sunflowers

Time again for some of your comments on some recent news stories:

The conversation continues on health insurance, in particular the “narrow network” plan Harvard Pilgrim is launching with partners Dartmouth-Hitchcock and Elliot Health Systems. The companies say it will be 10% cheaper than other group offerings.

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Foodstuffs
3:57 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Put Free Coffee On Laconia's Main Street, And People Will Come

Kevin Grollo (left) of Woodshed Coffee Roasters shows off some of the local blend at the New Hampshire Coffee Festival in Laconia.
Brady Carlson, NHPR

Organizers expected a nice, somewhat modest turnout for the first try at a New Hampshire Coffee Festival. But then, putting a sign out on Main Street that essentially says “free coffee” has a tendency to over-deliver.

“I literally cried in awe of the turnout and the people coming downtown to celebrate the Coffee Festival with us," promotions committee member Lori Chandler said.

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All Things Considered
5:13 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Winter Weather, Comets, And Hoverbikes: Inside The 2014 Old Farmer's Almanac

The 2014 Old Farmer's Almanac.
Credit Brady Carlson, NHPR

The 90 degree temperatures this week might not exactly suggest the coming arrival of fall, but here’s something that does: the new edition of Old Farmers Almanac is here. Senior Associate Editor Sarah Perreault gives All Things Considered host Brady Carlson a preview of the new edition.

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Foodstuffs
5:46 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Reflections On Food, And Faith, At Greek Fest

Susan Harris (left) and Mary Garci serve traditional Greek recipes at the Greek Fest at Taxiarchai Orthodox Church in Laconia.
Brady Carlson, NHPR

This time of year is full of food fests, including a preponderance of Greek fests.

Food is, of course, a central part of Greek culture, and as we found at a festival in Laconia, that means a look at the food can reveal something deeper.

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Environment
5:36 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Grid Operators Lay Out New England's Energy Future

Credit Flikr Creative Commons / Claudio Schwarz

The New England Independent System Operator, or ISO, who operates the region’s electric grid, presented the latest draft of its 10-year plan in Boston on Thursday. 

All Things Considered Host Brady Carlson speaks with NHPR's Sam Evans-Brown about the future of energy in the region. 

The ISO operates the Grid, but it doesn’t own any power plants, so how exactly are they involved with planning for the future of where we get our electricity.

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NH News
2:56 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Severe Storms Crossing New Hampshire

Jeff and Meghan Demers of Contoocook captured this lightning strike during last night's storm.
Credit Jeff and Meghan Demers for NHPR

Severe thunderstorms are again working their way across New Hampshire, bringing heavy rain and a chance of flooding in some areas.

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All Things Considered
5:37 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Your Comments: On Early Childhood Ed, Health Exchanges and World Records

Time now for some of your comments on some recent news stories:

This week Sam Evans-Brown reported on a state effort to win federal funding toward early childhood education. This is a field where salaries are traditionally low, and Marie Davis wrote a comment that better wages will improve quality. She writes that she drove her baby an hour to a center:

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Foodstuffs
1:51 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

How Much Variety Is There In New Hampshire's Breakfast Places?

Julien's Corner Kitchen in Manchester.
Brady Carlson, NHPR

My toddler, Owen, and I agree on most things when we go out for breakfast. We prefer booth seats over chairs, sharing is always encouraged at the table, and we always go for crayons and coloring books when they're offered.

The one difference? He, being two years old, prizes consistency in his breakfasts - the more similar they are to the last breakfast outing, the better. In fact, he doesn't use the word "breakfast" for these trips - "I wanna go out for pancakes," he says. 

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