Brady Carlson

Reporter and Host, Weekend Edition

Brady Carlson’s latest role at NHPR is actually two roles: reporting for NHPR’s news team, while also hosting Weekend Edition on Saturdays and Sundays.

It’s the latest stop on an NHPR career that has included a little bit of everything since he joined the station in 2005. As NHPR’s webmaster, he led NHPR.org's expansion into an Edward R. Murrow award-winning platform for online discussions and multimedia content, and he launched many of NHPR’s Facebook pages and Twitter feeds, as well as the station's Public Insight Network.

While serving as All Things Considered host for four years, he interviewed presidential hopefuls, authors, state lawmakers and other notable Granite Staters, while helping to add weekly segments such as Foodstuffs, Granite Geek and New England Snapshot. He’s guest hosted The Exchange, served as a frequent guest on Word of Mouth and helped to anchor NHPR’s election and primary night coverage.

In addition to his NHPR work, Brady is finishing up his first book, a tour of the gravesites of the U.S. presidents, which is set for publication in 2016.

Brady holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from Emerson College in Boston and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Science from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois. He and his wife, Sonya, live in Concord with their sons Owen and Wyatt.

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The school year is drawing to a close, but next week a group of teens in Salem are heading back to the classroom - and the kitchen.

They're taking part in the Junior Chef program, a partnership between the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Salem and the Tuscan Kitchen restaurant.

Eddie Payne is an executive chef with the Tuscan Kitchen. He describes the program to NHPR's Brady Carlson.

They are one of the least-enjoyed elements of the warm weather landscape in New Hampshire.

Ticks.

They bite. They carry Lyme disease and other nasty illnesses – and they’re pretty creepy looking as well.

Jo Naylor via Flickr CC

This week All Things Considered has been looking back at some of the major legislative debates this session at the New Hampshire statehouse. 

The Medicaid Enhancement Tax usually flies under the radar in New Hampshire: it’s complicated, boring on the surface and, as far as taxes go, pretty narrowly applied.

But the MET, as it's called, has major implications for the state budget and the state’s 26 hospitals. And debate over how to fix the MET gained plenty of attention this year, becoming one of the biggest policy issues lawmakers took on in 2014. 

This week All Things Considered is looking at the key bills at the statehouse this year – which passed, which didn’t, and why.

Proponents of repealing New Hampshire's death penalty law had new allies this year, including Governor Maggie Hassan, who promised to sign a repeal measure as long as it didn't affect the sentence of Michael Addison, the state's lone death row inmate.

The State House approved a repeal measure, but the Senate deadlocked 12-12 over the bill and ultimately laid it on the table.

John Wardell via Flickr CC

All Things Considered is looking at some of the key bills of the 2014 legislative session – and how they ended up passing or failing to pass.

This year's casino debate may have seen some new lines of argument, but the outcome was the same as in years past: casino proposals won support in the State Senate, but came up short in the State House.

Reporter Norma Love of the Associated Press explains the dynamic behind this year's casino debate to NHPR's Brady Carlson.

This week All Things Considered is looking at some of the key bills of the 2014 legislative session.

One of the most high-profile bills at the statehouse this year was a plan to ban the use of hand-held cell phones while driving.

Garry Rayno covers the statehouse for the New Hampshire Union Leader. He explains to All Things Considered host Brady Carlson how the bill came to pass the House and Senate, and some of the details of the measure.

Josh Rogers

  NHPR's Brady Carlson talks with Boston Globe reporter Todd Wallack.

Republican U.S. Senate hopeful Scott Brown has been back on the campaign trail this week, but it's the former Massachusetts Senator's work outside of politics that's now getting a lot of attention.

Ryan Lessard / NHPR

This week All Things Considered is taking a look at the 2014 legislative session - which key bills passed, which did not, and why.

One item that made it through the legislature this year was a roughly 4 cent increase to the state’s tax on gas and diesel. The law, which takes effect in July, is expected to fund highway improvements for about two years, and pay some of the bonds being used to finish the expansion of Interstate 93.

How it passed

Turkish Graves 2, Khartoum
Mattnic / Flickr Creative Commons

International attention is growing in the case of Meriam Ibrahim, the Sudanese woman sentenced to death for refusing to renounce Christianity.

New Hampshire has been paying particularly close attention as well – as Ibrahim is married to a Manchester man, Daniel Wani, who has been in Sudan the past year awaiting her trial.

Most Memorial Day events pay tribute to all those who have died in military service to the nation, but there are some events that honor individuals.

One such event takes place each year in Manchester in honor of Army Staff Sergeant Kyle Warren, a medic who was killed in Afghanistan's Helmand Province in 2010.

The workplace is changing a lot these days – for example, the coworker who used to sit next to you in the office may now telecommute, and work from home part of the week.

Or, the person who used to sit next to you may now stand next to you. Standing desks are a growing part of the office, and that now includes the offices of the Nashua Telegraph.

Robert Bell via Flickr CC

Gardeners are gearing up for this year's growing season, and many New Hampshire gardeners are hoping to grow their vegetables organically this year.

But that term, "organic," doesn't mean that same thing to every gardener.

  The week started with the news of Southern New Hampshire University’s new $10,000 bachelor’s degree program. Recent undergraduate enrollment numbers show the small, Manchester school is now equal in size to UNH in Durham, with a vast majority of its students online. 

College Board / https://trends.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/trends-2010-tuition-discounting-institutional-aid-report.pdf

Rising tuition attracts a lot of headlines, but the amount that schools give out in financial aid is also on the rise.  Financial aid can make higher education more accessible to low-income students, but it can also serve as a tool to attract the types of students school want to attract, and to fill seats that might otherwise go empty. Lucy Lapovsky is an education consultant who has studied the question of how much students are actually paying for college and spoke to All Things Considered Host Brady Carlson. 

The House has decided not to reconsider the two-casino proposal it rejected by a single vote at last week’s session.

Distant Hill Gardens via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/wyw4U

Crowdsourcing is all the rage on the web these days – people coming together to contribute money or knowledge to projects or initiatives they care about.

As we start this week's look at higher education in New Hampshire, we thought we would start with a look at how the landscape of higher education is changing – in effect, what’s prompting institutions to change.

The 2014 Locavore Index again ranks New Hampshire's local food system as one of the strongest in the country, rating third behind Vermont and Maine.

Martin Langeveld of Strolling of the Heifers, the Vermont organization which produces the Locavore Index, talks with All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about how New Hampshire's food system is growing and changing.

Flkr Creative Commons / Plug in America

It’s race season again at the New Hampshire Motor Speedway. No, NASCAR hasn’t come early. It’s time for the Formula Hybrid Competition, which started out as a small-scale event but now attracts engineering students - and car industry officials - from around the world.

NHPR Staff

It’s been nearly two years since state health officials announced a major outbreak of hepatitis C at Exeter Hospital. The cause of that outbreak was what's known as drug diversion – a hospital worker stealing drugs and tainting syringes later used on patients.

Flikr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

When you think of the places that have shaped technology the most, you might think of the garage where Apple’s Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak put together their first personal computers. You might think of the buildings at Harvard where Mark Zuckerberg started building a social website then known as “The Facebook.” Or you might think of the facilities in Washington state where Microsoft made billions selling its Windows operating system.

Intel Free Press via Flickr/CC - https://flic.kr/p/bA3eBS

A growing number of Americans are doing their jobs outside the usual confines of the office. And that includes doctors – the multi-billion dollar telemedicine industry is opening up new avenues for patients and for providers in New Hampshire.

Dank Depot via Flickr CC

Now that New Hampshire has a law allowing for the use of medicinal marijuana, it might not surprise you to find advertisements about how people can obtain registration cards for the program.

There’s only one catch: there is no such registration card as of yet, and that raises some serious questions about those advertisements and who’s behind them.

  The New Hampshire Fisher Cats hold their home opener tonight in Manchester. It's the 10th season of a team that was originally supposed to be called The New Hampshire Primaries. That plan changed dramatically thanks to a group of vocal and mobilized Granite Staters. To remind us what happened, we talk with Vin Sylvia, the deputy managing editor for sports at the New Hampshire Union Leader. Ironically, the current name was selected through a democratic process not unlike the actual Primaries.


Doug8888 via Twitter/CC - http://ow.ly/vpevy

Running a business that puts its profits into nonprofits isn't new - but the most common business we see is usually a thrift store.

A new coffeeshop in Manchester, called City Cafe, is using food and drink to boost nonprofit groups.

Massive open online courses are one of the big ideas these days in higher education – free college level courses in which anyone with enough time and a decent Internet connection can participate.

And as people have taken part in MOOCs, as they’re called, we’ve learned a lot about what works – and what doesn’t – when it comes to this style of learning.

Dartmouth College - that hallowed, prestigious Ivy League institution of higher learning - is now home to a food truck.

It's known as The Box, and it will serve Mediterranean-style sandwiches, salads and other foods, while giving students at the Tuck School of Business a chance to manage and operate a private, for-profit business.

antanacoins via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/uKtNw

Describing the virtual currency Bitcoin can be challenging. Sometimes the more questions you ask, the more complicated it sounds.

Public health officials have a problem. They want more parents to get their kids vaccinated, because there's been a resurgence of dangerous diseases as vaccination rates have dropped.

Public Service of New Hampshire is an energy utility – but it’s about to try an experiment in psychology, which it hopes might prompt consumers to use less electricity.

It's known as "nudging," and to explain how it works we turn to David Brooks, who writes the weekly GraniteGeek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and GraniteGeek.org.

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