Brady Carlson

Reporter and Host, Weekend Edition

Brady Carlson’s latest role at NHPR is actually two roles: reporting for NHPR’s news team, while also hosting Weekend Edition on Saturdays and Sundays.

It’s the latest stop on an NHPR career that has included a little bit of everything since he joined the station in 2005. As NHPR’s webmaster, he led NHPR.org's expansion into an Edward R. Murrow award-winning platform for online discussions and multimedia content, and he launched many of NHPR’s Facebook pages and Twitter feeds, as well as the station's Public Insight Network.

While serving as All Things Considered host for four years, he interviewed presidential hopefuls, authors, state lawmakers and other notable Granite Staters, while helping to add weekly segments such as Foodstuffs, Granite Geek and New England Snapshot. He’s guest hosted The Exchange, served as a frequent guest on Word of Mouth and helped to anchor NHPR’s election and primary night coverage.

In addition to his NHPR work, Brady is finishing up his first book, a tour of the gravesites of the U.S. presidents, which is set for publication in 2016.

Brady holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from Emerson College in Boston and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Science from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois. He and his wife, Sonya, live in Concord with their sons Owen and Wyatt.

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The next big digital frontier seems to be wearable technology. One example that comes to mind is the newly-announced Apple Watch, but what if the device in question wasn’t a device per se, but electronics built into what you’re already wearing?

Gilmanton, New Hampshire was once the most famous – or, if you prefer, notorious - small town in America, thanks to the 1950 Grace Metalious novel Peyton Place.

Here’s a statement about campaign advertising that may surprise you even if you’ve seen the influx of ads on TV and online video sites: “Candidates, parties and groups ran at least 10,300 TV ads in the New Hampshire U.S. Senate race.”

That statement comes from a project called “Who’s Buying the Senate?”

Geoff Forester, NHPR (file photo)

There's been no shortage of high-profile debates over the school system in New Hampshire's largest city.

In recent years there have been concerns about class sizes, academic standards and funding, to name just a few. And this week the Manchester Education Association voted against a proposed four year labor contract with the city.

You know the election season is gearing up when pollsters and survey researchers start calling residents, trying to gauge where the electorate stands on the issues and the candidates of 2014.

Politicians are, of course, quick to remind us that the only poll that matters is the one on election day, but there’s some evidence that another method, used regularly in the UK, may provide a clearer picture of where a campaign is headed than a traditional poll.

thronx via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/CltVB

The New Hampshire-based company GT Advanced Technologies is heading for chapter 11 bankruptcy.

In announcing the filing today, officials said that GT is not planning to go out of business, but instead try to develop a plan to reorganize.

Bob Sanders with the New Hampshire Business Review joined All Things Considered to discuss this development.

Stef Noble via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/CdH92

It’s apple season, and one of the most enjoyable ways to partake is the apple cider doughnut.

Amy Traverso is senior lifestyle editor at Yankee Magazine and author of The Apple Lover’s Cookbook.

She tells says even though New Hampshire has plenty of great cider doughnuts for sale, everyone should try making a batch at home at least once.

Hadley Paul Garland via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/C7DIV

Humans can't see ultraviolet light - but many types of wildlife can. And a man in Nashua is researching whether that difference may help humans and wildlife better co-exist in the future.

David Brooks writes the weekly GraniteGeek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and Granite Geek.org.

The 2015 Old Farmers Almanac.
Brady Carlson, NHPR

“Blizzards, drought, hurricanes – be ready.” That taken directly from the cover of the new edition of the Old Farmers Almanac, produced in Dublin, New Hampshire and famous for its weather predictions.

Sarah Perrault is Senior Associate Editor of the almanac, and she joined us for a look at the 2015 edition.

Brady Carlson, NHPR

A 16 year old inventor from New Hampshire has caught the attention of federal environmental officials.

Deepika Kurup of Nashua has won a President’s Environmental Youth Award from the White House Council on Environmental Quality and the Environmental Protection Agency for her work in finding sustainable ways to purify water.

She joined us to talk about her invention.

How does this method that you’ve developed work?

Lambeau Field / Flickr/CC

With several players charged with domestic violence, including a shocking video showing the abuse, many are questioning the league’s culture and policies. We’re looking into how widespread the problem is and what it might take to address what some are calling a systemic issue.

GUESTS:

Brady Carlson/NHPR

We continue our conversations with Republicans running in the gubernatorial race with former BAE Systems CEO Walt Havenstein.

You've proposed as part of your jobs plan cutting business profit taxes by just over 1%. Given the shortfalls that we've seen in business tax revenue in this current budget, how confident can we be that revenue will offset those cuts?

Cascadian Farm via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/APWQE

Yes, the Market Basket dispute is over, but not all is rosy in the New Hampshire food world. Take for example, the legal challenge in Walpole between two ice cream shops.

NHPR / Brady Carlson

We start our conversations with Republicans running in the gubernatorial race with tech entrepreneur Andrew Hemingway.

The first millennial candidate for governor in the country, in a state which is graying.

It is, yes, but I’m excited. It’s not something that I went out and sought after, but it’s something which the opportunity has presented itself. It’s an exciting opportunity.

Rebecca Lavoie for NHPR

We continue our series of conversations with three Republicans seeking their party’s nomination in the U.S. Senate.

Scott Brown served as a U.S. Senator from Massachusetts for three years, from 2010 to 2013. He also served in the Massachusetts Senate and House of Representatives.

Scroll down to find the full, unedited audio of our interview with Brown. Here are excerpts of his responses to some of the issues discussed, with his full answers (and more questions) in the audio.

NHPR Staff

We continue our series of conversations with three Republicans seeking their party’s nomination in the U.S. Senate.

Jim Rubens served in the N.H. State Senate from 1994-98 and is former chairman of the Granite State Coalition Against Expanded Gambling. 

Scroll down to find the full, unedited audio of our interview with Rubens. Here are excerpts of his responses to some of the issues discussed, with his full answers (and more questions) in the audio.

Jonathan Haeber via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/AKBvK

There are lots of ways to make and transmit electricity – solar energy hitting photovoltaic panels. Or causing turbines to spin with wind, or fossil fuels.

NHPR Staff

This week, we begin a series of conversations with three Republicans seeking their party’s nomination in the U.S. Senate.

We start with Bob Smith, who represented New Hampshire in the Senate from 1990 to 2003.

Scroll down to find the full, unedited audio of our interview with Smith. Here are excerpts of his responses to some of the issues discussed, with his full answers (and more questions) in the audio.

What would an overhaul of the federal tax system look like?

Sara Plourde / NHPR

GOP primaries for governor and congress heat up as the September primary nears, civil liberties advocates sue the town of Hudson on behalf of local panhandlers, and Rochester couple Diane and John Foley call their son, war reporter James Foley, a “martyr for freedom” after his grisly killing by Islamic extremists.

GUESTS:

Jeff Head / Flickr/CC

From Iraq to immigration, President Obama has come under criticism lately for ineffectual leadership. But from declining public approval, to a propensity for congressional gridlock, second presidential terms have long been plagued by such perceptions. We’re looking at President Obama’s second term -- the ways our political system limits what he can do and how the media covers this office.

GUESTS:

Makerbot Replicator 2
Harris County Public Library, via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/AuFTA

Attention residents of Milford: we don’t want to alarm you, but there is a replicator in your library.

Actually, it's a Makerbot Replicator 2, and it’s not as sinister as it might sound. This device is better known as a 3-D printer.

David Brooks tested out the printer for his Granite Geek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and Granite Geek.org, and he walks us through the process.

Bruce Lyndes / Plymouth State University

Last month, Fred Prince, a biology professor at Plymouth State University, found and confirmed the first woolly mammoth tooth on land in New Hampshire.

So the question is, what took so long - especially given that such teeth have already been found in Vermont and Maine?

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Public Service of New Hampshire says that its former CEO, Gary Long, died Friday afternoon after a sudden illness.

Long started at PSNH in 1976, and began his tenure as CEO in 2000. He led the state’s largest utility at a time when the state restructured the electric utility industry. He stepped down as CEO last year to take a role leading the Northern Pass project through the regulatory process. He was also serving as chair of the board of directors for the Granite United Way.

Sarah VanHorn, Manager of NH Community Seafood / N.H. Sea Grant

This is the second year for a New Hampshire program that brings the farm share model to fish.

It’s called New Hampshire Community Seafood, and it was the subject of a recent column by David Brooks, who writes the weekly Granite Geek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and Granite Geek.org. He joined us on All Things Considered to talk about the program.

Ale Viyie via Flickr Creative Commons

For years, Market Basket has called itself the store where you get more for your dollar.

And those longtime customers who are currently boycotting the chain over the firing of longtime CEO Arthur T. Demoulas say they’re spending more on groceries as they’re patronizing other stores.

Those worried about their grocery budgets might pick up a few tips from Erik August Johnson.

For the past few years Ben H. Winters has been writing detective novels set at the end of the world. His protagonist is Henry Palace, a member of the police force in Concord, NH, a man who is working to solve mysteries while a massive asteroid known as Maya heads toward Earth. As Maya’s impact grows closer society breaks further and further down, and still, Palace carries on. The third novel in this series has just been released, and it’s called World of Trouble. I spoke with Mr. Winters last week about his third and final book.

Brady Carlson, NHPR

We’ve talked for many years about how some rural areas of New Hampshire are in short supply of some services that are prevalent elsewhere. For example, there are some parts of the state without broadband internet access. Rural areas may not have access to the same types of health care and this includes legal services as well. Some counties have populations of lawyers that are graying but not growing. The new president of the New Hampshire Bar Association, Lisa Wellman-Ally, is launching an initiative aimed at recruiting lawyers to practice in underserved areas.

Ale Viyie via Flickr Creative Commons

The rewards card is everywhere these days. It usually works like this: the more consumers buy, the more incentives and discounts stores hand out.

Ella Nilsen / NHPR

The long-running dispute in the Market Basket supermarket chain appears to be growing.

Recently the company ousted CEO Arthur T. Demoulas, who had vocal support from Market Basket employees but had long been at odds with a faction on the board led by his cousin.

Update:  Thursday afternoon an attorney for the Hassan campaign asked New Hampshire Attorney General Joe Foster to expedite a review of the Republican party’s allegations.

New Hampshire Republicans have accused Gov. Maggie Hassan of accepting illegal campaign contributions from organized labor and have asked the Attorney General to investigate. At issue is a total of $45,000 in donations to the governor’s re-election campaign from three labor unions.

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