Brady Carlson

Reporter and Host, Weekend Edition

Brady Carlson’s latest role at NHPR is actually two roles: reporting for NHPR’s news team, while also hosting Weekend Edition on Saturdays and Sundays.

It’s the latest stop on an NHPR career that has included a little bit of everything since he joined the station in 2005. As NHPR’s webmaster, he led NHPR.org's expansion into an Edward R. Murrow award-winning platform for online discussions and multimedia content, and he launched many of NHPR’s Facebook pages and Twitter feeds, as well as the station's Public Insight Network.

While serving as All Things Considered host for four years, he interviewed presidential hopefuls, authors, state lawmakers and other notable Granite Staters, while helping to add weekly segments such as Foodstuffs, Granite Geek and New England Snapshot. He’s guest hosted The Exchange, served as a frequent guest on Word of Mouth and helped to anchor NHPR’s election and primary night coverage.

In addition to his NHPR work, Brady is finishing up his first book, a tour of the gravesites of the U.S. presidents, which is set for publication in 2016.

Brady holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from Emerson College in Boston and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Science from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois. He and his wife, Sonya, live in Concord with their sons Owen and Wyatt.

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Emily Corwin / NHPR

For nearly two months, more than 1,700 workers in northern New England have been off the job at Fairpoint Communications. The strike, they say, will continue until Fairpoint offers them a better contract. Fairpoint says the workers are the ones who need to compromise further.

CDC

Ebola isn’t in the headlines as much as it was about a month ago, but that doesn’t mean it’s not still a problem in West Africa. Over 6,000 people have died there and more than 17,000 have gotten sick with the virus. The Pentagon has sent troops to Africa to help fight the disease, and healthcare workers from around the country have also volunteered.

NHPR spoke with one of those volunteers. Dr. Elizabeth Talbot is New Hampshire’s Deputy Epidemiologist, and she joined us on the line from Sierra Leone, where she’s been for a month.

Around the country, protestors have been gathering to voice their concern over violence against black Americans by police officers. Last night, one of those protests was held in Hanover. (You can see photos of the protest here.)

This is a time of year when food banks and aid groups are looking for ways to encourage people to donate food and money to help the hungry.

The Portsmouth Public Library is offering its patrons a deal: donate food to the Seacoast Family Food Pantry and they’ll forgive some overdue fines.

Mulling It Over via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/Ffbdq

M.C. Escher has been all over Manchester lately (or, at least, his work has been). The Currier Museum of Art has been featuring Escher in an exhibit that runs through January 5th.

One of the ways health officials have tried to stem the growing amount of heroin and prescription opioid abuse in New Hampshire is methadone treatment. Methadone is an opioid, but given in the proper dose, it can reduce cravings without getting users high.

Leo-setä via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/ETla1

Mother Nature looks ready to unleash some snow on New Hampshire ahead of Thanksgiving. That's not great news for travelers, but it would be good news for New Hampshire ski areas - though, of course, they already have the technology to make their own snow no matter what’s coming down from the sky.

MassMatt via Flickr CC

It looks like there’s a solution in sight in the saga of Fred Fuller Oil and Propane.

The Hudson-based company filed for bankruptcy a week ago. Now, the state says there’s a buyer - Rymes Propane & Oil – and that the buyer will honor customers’ pre-buy oil contracts.

I spoke with New Hampshire Attorney General Joseph Foster about this tentative agreement.

Jocelyn & Cathy via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/EeQ62

Yankee Magazine recently released the winners of its 2014 Editors Choice Food Awards. One of the New Hampshire honorees caught our attention: Moochie’s Macarons of Nashua.

Users of the online video platform YouTube reportedly post some 100 hours of video content each minute.

Much of that content consists of very basic video narratives - people sharing their own experiences with the world. Researchers at Dartmouth have been looking at whether there are benefits when people with severe mental illness who post their narratives on YouTube.

Hammer & Saw Films

A marathon, of course, is 26.2 miles long. Elite runners can complete these races in just over three hours. Ultra-running events can be one hundred miles long. And as grueling as that sounds, these events are growing in popularity.

The documentary “100: Head/Heart/Feet” follows an ultra-runner from New Hampshire, Zak Wieluns, as he takes on the Vermont 100 Endurance Race.

voting booths
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

If you check your Facebook feed on this Election Day, there’s a chance you may see a friend post a “ballot selfie” - a photo taken in the voting booth of a completed ballot.

If that friend lives in New Hampshire, posting that photo might not be such a great idea. Such photos are illegal in this state – at least for now.

courtesy Library of Congress

A new book is shining a light on an unusual chapter in the life of the founder of Christian Science, Mary Baker Eddy.

In the second half of the 19th Century, the New Hampshire native was a wealthy and prominent public figure. But toward the end of her life, Eddy faced a legal challenge to her wealth and her fitness to manage her own affairs – and it came in part from inside her own family.

fivethirtyeight.com

New polls out over the past few days show all four of New Hampshire's major races in the state to be too close to call. 

That might prompt us to believe that anything could happen tomorrow, but as poll watchers will tell you, any single poll is just that: a single poll.

NHPR's Brady Carlson spoke with Harry Enten, a senior political writer with FiveThirtyEight -- the politics blog that introduced many politcal watchers to predictive elections models -- about just that. 

via YouTube

Normally watching TV means checking out a show with an occasional break or two for commercials. Watching TV these days feels more like watching large numbers of political ads with the occasional program thrown in.

And it looks like there will be many more to come.

Dave Levinthal is Senior Political Reporter for the Center For Public Integrity. He joined All Things Considered for another look at campaign ads and who’s paying for them.

Michelle Souliere via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/DtUCm

Ancient archaeology is the kind of thing that, with the right find, can quickly capture the public’s attention and fascination.

And yet a New Hampshire group that studies ancient stone structures is turning 50 this week – and few Granite Staters have heard of it.

Amy Quinton, NHPR

For the past several years, two men calling themselves The Fish Nerds have been on a quest to catch and eat all the species of New Hampshire freshwater fish. Their quest is now complete.

Clay Groves and Dave Kellam talked with All Things Considered about what they learned while trying to “Catch-m-All and Eat-m-All.”

How did this all get started?

As Election Day draws near we’re checking in each week on political ads and ad spending with Dave Levinthal, Senior Political Reporter for the Center for Public Integrity.

Over the past week Levinthal says political ads have turned negative – really negative.

Josh Rogers, NHPR

The New Hampshire Film Festival is getting underway this week in Portsmouth.

One film that’s getting a lot attention this year is called Slingshot. It’s named for a device that creates clean drinking water in areas where such water isn’t usually available. And it’s notable because it comes from New Hampshire inventor Dean Kamen. The film follows Kamen as he develops, tests and promotes the Slingshot, and reflects upon his career, his inventions, and why he does the work he does.

Press Release Finder via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/CL7zT

The next big digital frontier seems to be wearable technology. One example that comes to mind is the newly-announced Apple Watch, but what if the device in question wasn’t a device per se, but electronics built into what you’re already wearing?

Gilmanton, New Hampshire was once the most famous – or, if you prefer, notorious - small town in America, thanks to the 1950 Grace Metalious novel Peyton Place.

Here’s a statement about campaign advertising that may surprise you even if you’ve seen the influx of ads on TV and online video sites: “Candidates, parties and groups ran at least 10,300 TV ads in the New Hampshire U.S. Senate race.”

That statement comes from a project called “Who’s Buying the Senate?”

Geoff Forester, NHPR (file photo)

There's been no shortage of high-profile debates over the school system in New Hampshire's largest city.

In recent years there have been concerns about class sizes, academic standards and funding, to name just a few. And this week the Manchester Education Association voted against a proposed four year labor contract with the city.

You know the election season is gearing up when pollsters and survey researchers start calling residents, trying to gauge where the electorate stands on the issues and the candidates of 2014.

Politicians are, of course, quick to remind us that the only poll that matters is the one on election day, but there’s some evidence that another method, used regularly in the UK, may provide a clearer picture of where a campaign is headed than a traditional poll.

thronx via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/CltVB

The New Hampshire-based company GT Advanced Technologies is heading for chapter 11 bankruptcy.

In announcing the filing today, officials said that GT is not planning to go out of business, but instead try to develop a plan to reorganize.

Bob Sanders with the New Hampshire Business Review joined All Things Considered to discuss this development.

Stef Noble via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/CdH92

It’s apple season, and one of the most enjoyable ways to partake is the apple cider doughnut.

Amy Traverso is senior lifestyle editor at Yankee Magazine and author of The Apple Lover’s Cookbook.

She tells says even though New Hampshire has plenty of great cider doughnuts for sale, everyone should try making a batch at home at least once.

Hadley Paul Garland via Flickr/CC http://ow.ly/C7DIV

Humans can't see ultraviolet light - but many types of wildlife can. And a man in Nashua is researching whether that difference may help humans and wildlife better co-exist in the future.

David Brooks writes the weekly GraniteGeek science column for the Nashua Telegraph and Granite Geek.org.

The 2015 Old Farmers Almanac.
Brady Carlson, NHPR

“Blizzards, drought, hurricanes – be ready.” That taken directly from the cover of the new edition of the Old Farmers Almanac, produced in Dublin, New Hampshire and famous for its weather predictions.

Sarah Perrault is Senior Associate Editor of the almanac, and she joined us for a look at the 2015 edition.

Brady Carlson, NHPR

A 16 year old inventor from New Hampshire has caught the attention of federal environmental officials.

Deepika Kurup of Nashua has won a President’s Environmental Youth Award from the White House Council on Environmental Quality and the Environmental Protection Agency for her work in finding sustainable ways to purify water.

She joined us to talk about her invention.

How does this method that you’ve developed work?

Lambeau Field / Flickr/CC

With several players charged with domestic violence, including a shocking video showing the abuse, many are questioning the league’s culture and policies. We’re looking into how widespread the problem is and what it might take to address what some are calling a systemic issue.

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