Brady Carlson

Reporter and Host, Weekend Edition

Brady Carlson’s latest role at NHPR is actually two roles: reporting for NHPR’s news team, while also hosting Weekend Edition on Saturdays and Sundays.

It’s the latest stop on an NHPR career that has included a little bit of everything since he joined the station in 2005. As NHPR’s webmaster, he led's expansion into an Edward R. Murrow award-winning platform for online discussions and multimedia content, and he launched many of NHPR’s Facebook pages and Twitter feeds, as well as the station's Public Insight Network.

While serving as All Things Considered host for four years, he interviewed presidential hopefuls, authors, state lawmakers and other notable Granite Staters, while helping to add weekly segments such as Foodstuffs, Granite Geek and New England Snapshot. He’s guest hosted The Exchange, served as a frequent guest on Word of Mouth and helped to anchor NHPR’s election and primary night coverage.

In addition to his NHPR work, Brady is finishing up his first book, a tour of the gravesites of the U.S. presidents, which is set for publication in 2016.

Brady holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from Emerson College in Boston and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Science from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois. He and his wife, Sonya, live in Concord with their sons Owen and Wyatt.


Ways To Connect

Courtesy The University Of New Hampshire

 Officials at the University of New Hampshire and the Durham Police Department say they’re ready if any end-of-semester parties get out of hand this week.

Tuesday is the reading day, a campus-wide study day ahead of the start of final exams Wednesday. It’s also Cinco de Mayo, and there’s warm weather in the forecast. Those factors have all served as catalysts in years past for heavy drinking parties that have brought riot police to downtown Durham.

Anthony Quintano via Flickr/CC

 New Hampshire’s tourism industry is looking at opportunities to reach out to Canadian visitors as part of a two day annual conference.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

  Forecasters say Monday will likely bring New Hampshire its warmest temperatures of the year so far.

Meteorologist Rob St. Pierre of Hometown Forecast Services says an area of high pressure system has brought higher temperatures to the state, after several weeks of cooler weather:

“We had an upper level low sitting off to the east of Maine, and that was spinning in all the clouds. We had a northerly flow at the time, so that’s why our temperatures had a hard time getting out of the 40’s and low 50’s.”

Brady Carlson / NHPR

Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders is telling New Hampshire voters to prepare for “a lot of door knocking” as part of his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination.

Sanders kicked off his first visit to the state since announcing his campaign with a house party in Manchester. He characterized himself as an underdog who can counter better-funded candidates with grassroots support from voters.   

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The Ebola crisis in three countries in West Africa is not over, but as the rate of infection drops public health officials are looking at what they’ve learned from the epidemic that killed thousands, so that they can be better prepared for the next outbreak.

Brady Carlson / NHPR

Manchester Mayor Ted Gatsas says the city's police chief will meet this week with Uber representatives to review the company's policies on vetting drivers. That could mean the city and the ride-booking company could find a compromise over Uber's presence in Manchester.

voting booths
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A special House election this week in Hampstead and Kingston echoes the statewide debate over New Hampshire’s next two-year budget.

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Amtrak's Downeaster service says passengers should expect some delays and cancelations this week as the rail service begins spring maintenance.

Crews are preparing to replace roughly 22 thousand railroad ties along the tracks between Boston and Portland, Maine.  A number of midday runs are canceled for Tuesday and Wednesday. Peak hour trains in the morning and afternoon will run as scheduled but may face delays. Amtrak officials say they will post all service alerts on the Downeaster website.


Donald Trump is headed back through New Hampshire today as he explores a possible 2016 run for president.

The real estate mogul and reality TV star is holding his first town hall meeting at New England College in Henniker. He’ll also make stops in Salem, Hudson and Concord.

Trump has considered running for the White House several times before. This time he’s taken more concrete steps to launch a campaign. He announced plans to form an exploratory committee and hired staff in early voting states, including New Hampshire.

Downtown Portsmouth.
Squirrel Flight via Flickr/Creative Commons:

Portsmouth is hosting a community forum Monday night on the issue of heroin use.

The city has seen several heroin and opioid-related deaths already this year; it's part of a dramatic growth in drug overdose deaths in the state. Last week a 28 year old man died in the woods with heroin paraphernalia nearby.

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The traditional declaration of ice out on Lake Winnipesaukee came around the usual time in 2015, even after an unusually cold and snowy winter.

Next week Dartmouth College will showcase the work of its digital artists, from animators and game designers to those developing interactive pieces and even fashion.

Lorie Loeb is a professor in Dartmouth’s Computer Science department and director of its digital arts program. She joined Weekend Edition with a preview of the 4th annual Digital Arts Exhibition, known as DAX. It takes place Tuesday, April 28th from 7-10 pm.

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A lot of what you see at presidential primary events is pretty standard: a national political figure, local officials, members of the press, and, of course, voters.

On this night at the Snowshoe Club in Concord, there was something else: a long table with sixteen pies.

The guest of honor, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush, says he mostly adheres to a paleo diet, which doesn’t include baked goods. But in the spirit of the evening, he dug into a slice of blueberry pie – and the potential 2016 candidate had no regrets over indulging.

Brady Carlson, NHPR

The House Ways and Means committee has narrowly voted to recommend passage of a bill to authorize casinos in New Hampshire.

Before the 11 to 10 vote, committee members exchanged arguments familiar to anyone who’s followed casino debates in the past. Backers like Republican Gary Azarian of Salem said that, in addition to boosting jobs and economic growth, casinos would give the state revenue to fund its priorities without increasing taxes or fees.

Foreclosure sign
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HomeHelpNH, a state initiative to prevent foreclosures, says it’s helped about 750 households over the past two years. And state officials say there are many other households still working through the counseling process.

Scott Coultas via Flickr CC

As warmer weather has moved into New Hampshire, most of the state's more than 30 ski resorts have already closed. But Loon Mountain, Cannon Mountain and Mount Sunapee will stay open Saturday and Sunday, Bretton Woods will remain open through Monday, and Wildcat Mountain is planning to offer daily skiing through April 26.

Molly Mahar at Loon Mountain says this ski season only really hit its peak in the spring, well after the more traditional high points such as Christmas, New Year’s and Presidents Day.

Ze-ev Barkan via Flickr CC

New Hampshire will likely become the first state to repeal laws allowing employers to pay workers with disabilities at a rate lower than the minimum wage.

The bill passed this week by the House not only does away with a provision allowing employers to pay people with disabilities below minimum wage in most circumstances, but it also bans so-called sheltered workshops.  That’s when an organization sets up a workplace aimed at people with disabilities.

Brady Carlson

The CEO of Segway Inc. says the personal transportation device maker plans to stay in New Hampshire after being acquired by a Chinese firm.

In recent years America has marked 50 years since a number of key moments in the civil rights movement. The March on Washington. The murder of Medgar Evers. The Bloody Sunday at the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma.

This year marks a half century since a killing that hits closer to home.

Jonathan Daniels, a native of Keene, New Hampshire, was killed in the summer of 1965. And Keene State College is holding a series of events this year about Daniels’ life and legacy.

New Hampshire Employment Security

New data shows New Hampshire’s seasonally adjusted jobless rate held steady at 3.9 percent in March, but that doesn’t mean there haven’t been changes in the state’s labor market.

Economist Annette Nielsen with New Hampshire Employment Security says there’s more movement among those with jobs and those seeking them. “When there’s more employment opportunities," Nielsen said, "you see a tendency of more people that have been sitting kind of on the fringes joining back in. And that’s what we’re seeing right now.”

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It was 1623 when European settlers established their first fishing colony in the area around the Piscataqua River.  That was nearly 400 years ago – and yet the period between then and now is just a small part of the human history of the area we now call New Hampshire.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Life on New Hampshire’s Isles of Shoals isn’t always the same as it is for those of us on the mainland. But a solar energy project there may point the way toward the future of energy all over the region.

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There's a spring tradition that's been building over the last few years: Peeps diorama contests. Participants use those marshmallow birds and bunnies to put together all kinds of wacky and creative displays.

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It’s time to talk about cats.

Yes, it’s hard to believe that in the internet era, where Grumpy Cat and Keyboard Cat have become celebrities, and seemingly every third item we see on Facebook is a cat video, that we’d need to spend more time on felines.

NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center.

A Dartmouth astrophysicist is part of a team that’s been looking billions of years into the universe’s past – and they’ve found some clues that may explain why galaxies form the way they do.

Ryan Hickox is an assistant professor of physics and astronomy. The findings of his team were published in the journal Nature. Ryan Hickox joined All Things Considered with more on the findings.


Rob_ / Flickr CC

Recently Eversource Energy, formerly known as PSNH, announced it would sell off its power plants. That would make New Hampshire’s electricity suppliers separate from its electricity producers - at least for a while. A new bill in front of the State House would make it easier for electric utilities to own what are called “distributed energy resources,” which refers primarily to solar power.

Ben Hudson via Society for Protection of NH Forests

Last week, 12 deer were found dead in South Hampton. On Tuesday New Hampshire Fish and Game announced the cause of those deaths: feeding by humans.

Dan Bergeron is a deer project leader with New Hampshire Fish and Game. He joined All Things Considered with more on what happened.

 What were these deer fed, and why was that bad for them?

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Kentucky US Senator Rand Paul is in New Hampshire again. He's one of a number of Republicans considering a presidential bid for 2016.

He spoke with All Things Considered following an event in Manchester.


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The idea of building a road is pretty straightforward – you build a path and let vehicles go on the path.

The reality is, of course, is way more complicated. How many lanes does the road need, and in which directions? Which signs are necessary – and which are distracting? Does the road make it too hard for vehicles to get through – or can it actually be too easy?

Bill Abbott via Flickr CC

Big changes in the economy are often followed by social changes. One such change is in how married couples manage the work of caring for their children.

Kristin Smith is a family demographer at the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. She joined All Things Considered to talk about her recently published research on the number of married fathers providing child care.