Britta Greene

Upper Valley/Monadnock Reporter

Britta covers the Upper Valley and Monadnock regions for NHPR's newsroom. She comes to New Hampshire from Minnesota Public Radio, where she produced Morning Edition and other local programming. 

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NHPR File Photo

Bill Kelley, the final of three Dartmouth College psychology professors facing allegations of sexual harassment and discrimination, has resigned.

James Napoli

Dennis Follensbee took a hike in the White Mountains about a month ago. He wanted to get away, to find some peace and quiet. Or, as he puts it, “nature sounds and not people sounds.”

As he climbed out of the valley, the trickling of water from the brook below slowly faded away. The leaves rustled in the trees. But then, all of a sudden, he hit a ridge and everything changed.

“You feel like you’re in the middle of nowhere, pushing through the forest,” he said. “And then you hear the brrrrrruhhhh coming through, all the way from Lincoln, and you’re like, man!”

It turned out it was motorcycle week.  The noise was echoing across his path.

NHPR File Photo

The state health department is hosting a public meeting in Concord a week from today for input on how to allocate a big increase in federal funds toward the opioid crisis. 

The money is coming to the state as part of the most recent Congressional budget deal.

Local officials now have less than a month to decide how it will be spent.

Members of the public can submit feedback by email through July 27. 

Courtesy Ron DiMasi

A bear in Hanover nicknamed "Mink" is now the subject of a second online petition aimed at saving her life.

The first, last year, gained so much attention that Governor Chris Sununu ordered Fish and Game to pardon the animal. At the time, her then-yearlings had gotten into a home in town.

This time around, the petition comes after Mink’s relocation to the North Country. According to the latest update from Fish and Game, she’s covering long distances to try to get home. 

NHPR File Photo

Speaking at the U.S. District Court in Concord on Thursday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a surge in federal enforcement efforts around synthetic opioids. 

AP

The Executive Council green-lighted additional state funds for drug recovery centers Wednesday.

In February, one of the state's largest operators of such facilities, Hope for New Hampshire Recovery announced it needed to roll-back its services across the state to stabilize its balance sheet. That included closing centers in Claremont and Concord.

New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services

A team of researchers is sampling lakes across the Northeast this week as part of efforts to better understand what’s causing cyanobacteria blooms.

The blooms have become common in other parts of the country, including the Midwest, and are starting to pop up locally in New Hampshire and surrounding states. Scientists are unsure what’s driving the change.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

Mink, New Hampshire’s famous female bear, has covered more than 80 miles since Fish and Game officials released her in the North Country just over a week ago.

She’s trying to make her way back home to Hanover, all the while being tracked by radio collar. The problem is, she doesn’t know which direction to go.

Governor Chris Sununu’s office is pushing forward with his Recovery Friendly Workforce initiative despite roadblocks in the state legislature this spring.

The goal of the initiative is to get the private sector more involved in preventing addiction and supporting workers struggling with drug and alcohol abuse.

Mickki via Flickr Creative Commons

Keene residents now have an option for curbside compost pick-up.

The Elm City Compost Initiative began its collection service last week, accepting produce, meat and dairy scraps, as well as compostable paper and plastic products.

For $15 per month, the business will pick up a five-gallon bucket each week. Customers receive a clean bucket with each collection.

The Claremont MakerSpace celebrated its grand opening Friday. 

Sen. Maggie Hassan and Rep. Annie Kuster were in attendance for the ribbon cutting,  accomplished by laser cutter, rather than a traditional set of shears.

The project, which received both federal and state funds, has been in the works for years.  It’s an important keystone in efforts to revitalize the city, Kuster said.

Courtesy photo

The First Congregational Church of Wilmot is hosting public gathering this weekend to respond to anti-semitic graffiti recently discovered on the church’s front door.

A couple weeks ago, reverend Sara Marean drove up to her church for the Sunday service and found the scrawled in black permanent marker across the building’s white door. She says it was a shock to her community.

State health officials have released two more audits of local addiction treatment providers as part of an ongoing review of all such organizations receiving state funds. 

The audits highlight concerns with the organizations’ financial and human resource operations, particularly around proper record-keeping.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

One year after New Hampshire moved to expand access to acupuncture for those struggling with addiction and mental health, the new law has yet to be rolled out.

The legislation allows licensed recovery coaches, peer counselors and health care professionals to offer a specific type of acupuncture, what’s known as acu-detox or ear acupuncture, after going through a standard training.

Britta Greene / NHPR

In early 2002, Jennifer Groh, then a junior faculty member in Dartmouth's psychology department, had lunch with two of her female colleagues. They shared a disturbing story.

The weekend before, they told Groh, at a graduate student recruiting event at a local bar, a professor in their department had groped one of his students. 

NHPR Staff

Paul Whalen, one of three Dartmouth psychology professors accused of sexual misconduct, has resigned. He’s the second of the men to leave his position in light of the school’s investigation into their behavior.

Todd Heatherton, a former department chair who’d been on the faculty for more than two decades, stepped down earlier this month.

CREDIT SARA PLOURDE / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu’s advisor on addiction and behavioral health, David Mara, visited with physicians and chiropractors at a Dartmouth-Hitchcock facility in Lebanon Tuesday.

They met to discuss chiropractic care as an alternative to opioids for management of back pain, a common condition.

A recent study found New Hampshire patients who were treated by chiropractors for non-cancer-related back pain were significantly less likely to fill a prescription for an opioid-based medication.

NHPR Staff

State officials have less than two months to detail their plans to spend a major increase in federal opioid dollars.

This is the money Congress made available through the budget deal in March. It's a major boost for New Hampshire -  up to nearly $23 million from just $3 million last year.

The Lebanon City Council has adopted a resolution denouncing racism.

The move comes after fliers promoting white supremacy were distributed in a local shopping plaza earlier this year. The Lebanon police investigated but didn’t make any arrests.

NHPR Photo

A much-awaited vote on public funds for addiction recovery efforts in Claremont and Concord was tabled at the Executive Council meeting Wednesday.

Health Commissioner Jeffrey Meyers said it’s for the sake of transparency around Harbor Homes, the organization that will facilitate those funds. 

University of New Hampshire's Carsey School of Public Policy

Opioid overdose rates are rising rapidly in rural counties, according to new research from the University of New Hampshire’s Carsey School of Public Policy.

Rates remain higher overall in urban areas, but have jumped more quickly outside of city centers, researchers found. They looked at two decades of death data collected by the Centers for Disease Control. 

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth’s newly formed chapter of the American Association of University Professors is responding to the first disciplinary action taken by the college against three psychology professors under criminal investigation for sexual misconduct.

AP

New Hampshire will soon see a more than seven-fold increase in federal funds aimed at combatting the opioid crisis, up from about $3 million to $23 million for the fiscal year ending September 30.

NHPR Staff

One of three Dartmouth psychological and brain sciences professors under state investigation surrounding sexual misconduct allegations is retiring effective immediately.

The college was on track to fire Todd Heatherton after completing its own investigation. That was the recommendation of the dean of the faculty of arts and sciences.

(Click here for earlier reporting by NHPR.)

Overdose deaths in New Hampshire ticked up slightly last year, the vast majority opioid-related, according to new data from the state's medical examiner.

A total of 487 people died from drug use in 2017, up from 485 in 2016.

The uptick is small relative to several years of rapid growth, but still reflects the state's highest figure in well over a decade. 

Per-capita overdose deaths in New Hampshire are among the highest in the nation.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Senate Majority Leader Jeb Bradley, a chief architect of the state's new Medicaid expansion program, is pushing back against financial concerns raised by mental health and substance abuse treatment providers.

Courtesy of Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine

Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine is launching new research looking at the effectiveness of treatment programs for pregnant women struggling with opioid abuse.

Standard care for this population involves both prenatal care and addiction treatment, including a medication like Suboxone or methadone to stop the symptoms of withdrawal.

A Sullivan County judge has set a December trial date for former Claremont police officer Ian Kibbe.

Kibbe is facing several charges relating to allegedly faking documents while serving on the Claremont police force.

He appeared briefly in court in Newport Tuesday. His attorney declined a plea deal offered by the state.

As he awaits trial, both the Claremont Police Department and the Sullivan County Attorney's office have been combing through his arrest reports. They're throwing out cases that are now in question in light of the charges against him.

Courtesy of Crawford Notch Campground

Cornish police shot and killed a bear Monday that had  repeatedly returned to a local property to feed on the homeowner's chickens. 

The homeowner, who runs a daycare onsite, first called the police Saturday.

Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

State wildlife officials are considering scrapping their plans to relocate a female bear from the Hanover area.

It’s the latest turn-of-events for an animal whose fate has swung dramatically over the past year, aided in part by a grassroots public-awareness campaign and a last-minute reprieve by Governor Chris Sununu.

Fish and Game officials decided last spring to kill the bear after her then-yearlings got into a home in Hanover.

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