Britta Greene

Upper Valley/Monadnock Reporter

Britta covers the Upper Valley and Monadnock regions for NHPR's newsroom. She comes to New Hampshire from Minnesota Public Radio, where she produced Morning Edition and other local programming. 

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Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

The Executive Council unanimously approved $600,000 for Manchester-based Hope for New Hampshire Recovery Wednesday, despite a recent audit finding the organization has failed to comply with state contracts in the past.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

More than half a million dollars in new state funding for a major operator of recovery centers is up in the air ahead of a key Executive Council vote Wednesday morning. 

That’s after the Department of Health and Human Services on Monday released an audit of the organization, Hope for New Hampshire Recovery, detailing financial and operational concerns.

Paige Sutherland / NHPR

A state audit of one of the largest operators of drug recovery centers in New Hampshire has pointed to multiple problems with the organization's financial and operational policies, as well as failure to meet certain billing and reporting requirements. 

Voters in more than 75 towns across the state will decide on Keno at town meetings this spring.

State lawmakers legalized the lottery game last year as a way to help fund all-day kindergarten statewide.

But it still has to be approved on a city-by-city or town-by-town basis.

In Enfield, where it’ll be up for a vote at the Town Meeting next month, selectman Meredith Smith says she hopes voters reject Keno and send a message to Concord. “Gambling is not a way to fix the funding of the schools,” she said.

James Napoli

There are the mysteries you know about, and then there are the ones lurking in your midst. For the staff at Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site in Cornish, it was a bit of both.

The site, run by the National Park Service, is the estate of Gilded Age sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens. Saint-Gaudens is behind many iconic monuments still standing today, most famously of Civil War heroes in Chicago and Boston. 


Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Craig Perry stopped by the Claremont office of Hope for New Hampshire Recovery on Thursday afternoon. He struggled with addiction for a good chunk of his 20s, but now, at 30 years old, he’s been clean for about a year and a half.

His drug problems started when he took his first job after college, he said. He’d get high on lunch breaks.  “I didn’t know it’d affect me like that,” he said. “More and more, and then I had to go to heavier stuff.”

He’s been coming to the center here for about five months. He has a close relationship with its manager, who's been a bedrock counselor in his recovery.

Paige Sutherland / NHPR

Advocates for the Hope for New Hampshire Recovery center in Berlin are scrambling to save it. The center is one of four slated to close in the next two weeks.

Hope for New Hampshire offers peer-to-peer drug and alcohol recovery services, but the organization announced earlier this week that it’s in a financial bind, and has to close shop everywhere but Manchester.

NHPR Staff

 

A fraternity at Dartmouth College has admitted to violating the school’s hazing and alcohol policies. 

 

Hazing is also illegal under state law, though legal standards and school policy differ. The college says it’s shared its information on the case with the Hanover Police Department. 

 

A police spokesperson declined to comment Thursday on whether the department has opened an investigation. 

 

The fraternity, Kappa Kappa Kappa, is under suspension through mid June and will be on probation through early 2020. 

 

NHPR File Photo

New Hampshire's largest operator of drug recovery centers is closing all but one of its locations, citing financial struggles.

Hope for New Hampshire Recovery offers support services for people struggling with drug addiction. But the organization announced Tuesday it'll close four centers: in Franklin, Concord, Claremont, and Berlin.

Those centers will close by the end of the month. It'll keep its doors open only in Manchester. That's its original -- and largest -- location.  

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College is close to completing sexual misconduct investigations into three of the school’s psychology professors. The professors – Paul Whalen, Bill Kelley and Todd Heatherton – have been on leave with restricted access to campus since last fall.

Depending on the findings of the investigations, the school will soon consider disciplinary action where appropriate, President Phil Hanlon wrote in an email to students, faculty and staff Monday.

Britta Greene / NHPR

A collection of children’s books in indigenous languages are on display this week in Hanover. The exhibit is scheduled to correspond with International Mother Language Day, a United Nations effort to recognize languages that are under threat.

Buyouts and cost-cutting in recent months at Keene State College have put the school on track to balance its budget for the coming fiscal year, according to Interim President Melinda Treadwell.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Jessica Saturley-Hall knew she wanted to start her own business, and she got hooked on the concept of compost. She knew that food scraps produce significantly more methane, a greenhouse gas, when tossed in a landfill, rather than breaking down on their own. So she wondered, what if you could reward people for separating their food waste from their trash.

At first, she thought about somehow paying people for their compost. She did a host of financial models, looked at it every which way, but couldn’t come up with a solution.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Governor Chris Sununu signed into law Thursday morning new protections against childhood lead exposure.

At a signing ceremony in Claremont, the Governor championed the public health impact of the new law.

"We will, without a doubt, prevent a lot of children from getting lead poisoning,” he said. “That's a really good thing"

The legislation mandates lead screenings for all one and two year olds. It also lowers the blood-lead level that triggers state intervention.

James Napoli

New works in progress by black playwrights will be performed this weekend in the Upper Valley. The festival is sponsored by JAG productions, a relatively new black theater company that’s been drawing audiences across western New Hampshire and eastern Vermont.


Dennis Curran / Courtesy of Dartmouth College

Dartmouth College will have a strong presence at this year's winter Olympic Games, opening Friday in PyeongChang, South Korea.

Fifteen former or current students will be competing – a high tally, even for a school that's regularly represented in the winter events. 

 

A judge in Virginia has denied a request by Christopher Cantwell to move his trial outside the Charlottesville area. 

 

Cantwell is a Keene-based white nationalist. He made headlines in August for his participation in the violence surrounding the Unite-the-Right Rally. He's been held since then in Virginia on charges relating to his use of pepper spray. 

 

Cantwell says all the attention on his case in Charlottesville will make it impossible for him to have a fair trial. 

 

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

As part of our series “The Balance," we’re asking for your input on the costs and benefits of living in New Hampshire. One issue we’re hearing a lot about is property taxes, which provide the bulk of money for public schools. The city of Claremont has the highest property tax rate in the state. This year, some residents there are saying ‘enough is enough," and the school board is taking a hard look at its budget. It’s also raised a conversation about the role schools should play in students' lives.

A former physician at Valley Regional hospital in Claremont has been charged with sexual assault.

The Claremont Police and Sullivan County Attorney's office announced the arrest of Dr. Eric L. Knight Monday after a months-long investigation.

The New Hampshire Board of Medicine suspended Knight's medical license in September. He was fired from Valley Regional in June.

Dartmouth

Dartmouth College is updating its image with a new logo, typeface and standardized color palette.

The new logo features a simplified image of the college’s iconic lone pine, a tree under which students are said to have gathered in the 1800s. The college’s new wordmark, the visual presentation of its name, also hearkens back to its history. The wordmark’s font is based off a typeface created by designer Rudolf Ruzicka for Dartmouth's 200th anniversary in 1969.

Hanover police say they're investigating a fire last week at Hanover High School.  Fire officials have determined it was started intentionally in a boys bathroom on the school's third floor.  The fire was quickly put out and no one was injured.  

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Between pouring drinks and clearing the deck, the bartender at the American Legion post in Lebanon this week has an additional task in mind: political organizing. Behind the bar is an old-fashioned paper petition -- they're trying to get enough signatures to put the electronic gambling game Keno on the city ballot in March.

It’s been a tough go. The deadline for the petition is Wednesday, and on Monday afternoon, even the club manager said he’s not confident they’ll get the 420 names they need.

visitnhcolleges.com

The University System of New Hampshire is expanding a program offering four years of free tuition to in-state students who qualify for federal Pell grants.

The program, known as "Granite Guarantee," began last year at the University of New Hampshire.  It'll now expand to cover Keene State College and Plymouth State University. Those schools will begin covering tuition for first-year students enrolling next fall.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Speaking at a Martin Luther King Jr. event in Manchester, Governor Chris Sununu urged New Hampshire residents to add their voice to community forums in the coming months.

 

He pointed to his administration’s new council on diversity and inclusion, as well as a new Civil Rights Unit established within the Attorney General’s Office.

 

 

Vermont is poised to legalize possession of small amounts of marijuana beginning this summer. Police along New Hampshire’s western border, though, say they’re not concerned about the policy change.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Long-running efforts to expand public boat access on Lake Sunapee may be headed in a new direction.

Officials with the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department had been working for decades to build a new public boat launch on a piece of land known as the Wild Goose Site when Governor Chris Sununu abruptly pulled the plug on the plan last summer.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Dr. Anna Konopka, a physician in New London, surrendered her medical license in October to settle allegations from the New Hampshire Board of Medicine. Months later, she’s still fighting to reopen her doors.

As her battle plays out in the courts, many of her patients are struggling to find a new primary care doctor. Many of them are low income and reliant on pain medication day-to-day.

Lebanon became the second New Hampshire city Wednesday to categorically say no to Keno, without putting the issue in front of voters.

State lawmakers allowed cities and towns to authorize the gambling game last year as a way to raise money for all-day kindergarten statewide. Districts are eligible for the kindergarten funding, though, whether or not they approve the game.

Archive

President Donald Trump has granted New Hampshire's request for federal disaster aid to cover storm damage this fall.

Heavy rain and strong winds swept across northern and western New Hampshire right around Halloween. The storm left behind damaged roads and bridges, as well as significant power outages.

FEMA estimated it cost the state nearly $6 million. Governor Chris Sununu requested federal assistance for Belknap, Carroll, Coos, Grafton and Sullivan Counties. President Trump has now signed-off on that request.

A still from Vice News "Charlottesville: Race and Terror"

Christopher Cantwell, a prominent Keene-based white nationalist, is suing two people who recently testified against him in court in Virginia.

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