Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

An Ohio State University student who went missing Wednesday was found dead Sunday, apparently from a self-inflicted gunshot wound, police say.

The Associated Press reports that Kosta Karageorge, 22, was a senior defensive tackle on the OSU football team and a former Buckeyes wrestler.

Philip Crane, a former Illinois congressman who spent 35 years in the House of Representatives, has died of lung cancer at the age of 84.

Crane, a conservative Republican and anti-tax crusader, was a history professor before he became a politician. He entered Congress in 1969, and he "was the longest-serving House Republican when he was defeated in 2004 by Democrat and then-political newcomer Melissa Bean," writes The Associated Press. The wire service continues:

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