Casey McDermott

State of Democracy/Health Reporter

Credit John W. Hession

Casey McDermott is a reporter covering politics, policy and healthcare.

Prior to joining NHPR, Casey worked at The Concord Monitor and held internships at ProPublica, the Student Press Law Center and the Chronicle of Higher Education. 

She studied journalism and sociology at Penn State but spent most of her days (and nights) in the newsroom of the independent student newspaper, The Daily Collegian. The Collegian was recognized nationally for its work during Casey's time as its managing editor and editor-in-chief.

New Hampshire is once again trying to be the first state to get federal approval to add work requirements to its Medicaid expansion program. This comes a year after the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services rejected a similar request — albeit under a different administration.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

A federal oversight agency’s review of how New Hampshire is spending $18 million in federal election money finds that the state, for the most part, follows the rules. But the back-and-forth within the audit illuminates a larger and long-running tension between the New Hampshire Secretary of State’s office and the federal elections officials.

FILE

A controversial bill to reform food stamp eligibility drew opposition earlier this year, in part, after revelations it was being pushed by an out-of-state think tank on a nationwide campaign to reform welfare systems. It was shelved back in April but, after a Thursday work session, is now poised to get a second look from lawmakers. 

Michael Brindley/NHPR

Deputy Secretary of State Dave Scanlan says the office is reevaluating its guidance to cities and towns after “handwritten confidential, non-public information” was found in the public voter checklists of more than 40 New Hampshire communities.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

A medical device company setting up shop on the Seacoast is the latest business Gov. Chris Sununu is pointing to as a success story from his effort to promote the state to “100 Businesses in 100 Days” earlier this year.

White House Livestream

(This story has been updated with new information.)

The Secretary of State’s office is holding off on sending voter information to the Trump commission, after discovering that some public checklists included confidential information, including details about domestic violence victims that were not supposed to be made public.

istock photo

A new report commissioned by the New Hampshire Insurance Department shows that the people covered by New Hampshire's expanded Medicaid program are younger — but also more expensive — than expected. That’s raising new questions for lawmakers to consider as they grapple with how the program should continue beyond its current expiration date at the end of 2018.

Allegra Boverman, NHPR

The Trump administration’s Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity is coming to New Hampshire next month. Secretary of State Bill Gardner’s office confirmed those plans, as did an official notice in the federal register.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A pair of lawsuits were filed Wednesday challenging a controversial new voting law, SB3, just weeks before the law is set to take effect.

One legal challenge comes from the New Hampshire Democratic Party. The other is filed on behalf of the League of Women Voters of New Hampshire and three individual would-be voters.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

Earlier this year, the legislature passed a package of reforms meant to expand access to mental health treatment. New Hampshire's Department of Health and Human Services is having mixed success soliciting vendors to oversee those changes — they’ve received multiple proposals for some projects but none for others.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Jeff Meyers said he made multiple attempts throughout 2016 to clarify whether the federal government approved of New Hampshire’s use of provider donations to fund its current Medicaid expansion plan — but the agency never gave him a definitive "yes" or "no" answer last year.

James Jordan / Flickr CC

A person in Hanover has tested positive for a rare mosquito-borne illness called the Jamestown Canyon Virus, but health officials are stressing this is a sign to take precautions against arboviral illnesses of all kinds.

Paige Sutherland/NHPR

The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner is projecting at least 466 people will die from drug overdoses by year’s end — not quite as many as last year’s record of 486, but close.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Last week, the New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office took its first steps to sue an opioid company — Purdue Pharma — over its alleged role in the state’s addiction crisis. Now, some local communities may soon follow with lawsuits of their own.

istock photo

It's looking like New Hampshire customers buying individual plans on the state's health insurance exchange will have their choice of three carriers next year: Anthem, Harvard Pilgrim and Ambetter. 

Garrett Vonk

New Hampshire has a long history of coming up with solutions to fund its Medicaid program that — depending on how you look at it — are either creative or a little crooked. The most recent example can be seen in the plan lawmakers came up with to fund the state’s share of Medicaid expansion for the last two years.

Jason Moon, NHPR

A set of controversial new child care rules that were due for a vote this week have been postponed at the request of Gov. Chris Sununu and the Department of Health and Human Services. 

Casey McDermott, NHPR

People across New Hampshire gathered yesterday at vigils and other events to respond to the violence in Charlottesville this weekend. NHPR’s Casey McDermott attended an interfaith service in Concord last night, and she brings back this audio postcard.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  Gov. Chris Sununu condemned the violence that broke out at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville this weekend and said “it’s appalling to [him] that in the year 2017 we're even having this conversation.”

“It's absolutely disgusting” Sununu told NHPR on Sunday. “That kind of racism, you know, this white supremacy stuff — it's just, there's absolutely no place for it.”

Federal officials have warned New Hampshire that the funding structure underlying the state’s Medicaid expansion plan might be invalid — and they’re giving state officials until the end of next year to fix it, or risk losing future federal funding for the program. 

Library of Congress

The MacDowell Colony, an artists’ retreat in Peterborough, has nurtured some of the most influential creative thinkers of the last century. This weekend, the colony will open its doors to the public for its annual Medal Day ceremony — where it plans to honor filmmaker David Lynch.

Josh Rogers, NHPR

The New Hampshire Rebellion will hold its fourth annual “Granny D” memorial walk this weekend, commemorating the late campaign finance reformer’s cross-country journey to get money out of politics. Organizers say there’s a lot of work left to be done at the national — and local — level.

jamiesrabbits on Flickr / http://bit.ly/2vLTghb

New Hampshire's Attorney General made waves earlier this week when it brought its first lawsuit against a pharmaceutical giant, Purdue, over its alleged role in the state’s opioid crisis. But this is just the latest in a decades-long trend of states taking big industries to court.

New Hampshire’s Office of the Attorney General filed its first lawsuit against one of the companies it’s been investigating over their role in the state’s opioid crisis.

White House Livestream

A lawsuit that sought to restrict New Hampshire's ability to share voter information with the Trump administration’s election integrity commission was resolved in court Monday. 

Both sides compromised on a plan to allow Secretary of State Bill Gardner to share scanned, unsearchable copies of local voter checklists from all wards across the state— not the larger, digitized version of that information that is collected in the central statewide voter database.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The fight over whether New Hampshire should share voter files with the Trump administration’s election commission has its first court hearing Monday afternoon in Nashua.

Two New Hampshire lawmakers, with the help of the New Hampshire branch of the American Civil Liberties Union, are trying to stop Secretary of State Bill Gardner from sharing information from the statewide voter file with the Trump administration.

www.BackgroundNow.com / Flickr/Creative Commons

New Hampshire will receive a little over $70,000 as part of a multi-state settlement with a pharmaceutical company accused of off-label marketing and kickbacks for two of its cancer drugs, the attorney general’s office announced Friday.

Reuters

While she might not agree with the President’s description of New Hampshire as a “drug-infested den” — as far as Kriss Blevens is concerned, his sentiment is spot-on.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire politicians on both sides of the aisle were quick to condemn comments President Trump reportedly made during a conversation with the President of Mexico earlier this year about the Granite State’s opioid epidemic.

istock photo

Insurance Commissioner Roger Sevigny says he can’t remember another time when trying to map out New Hampshire insurance markets was quite as tricky as it is today.

“This kind of uncertainty is unprecedented,” Sevigny said Tuesday, when asked to put this year’s marketplace planning into context. 

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