Chris Jensen

North Country Reporter

Christopher Jensen worked as a reporter for The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer for 25 years, covering topics including desegregation, the 1st Gulf War, international charities’ fraud and the auto industry. He also wrote stories about competing in off-road races including the 1988 TransAmazon, the Baja 1000, the Paris-Moscow-Beijing Raid and Paris-Dakar.

Since 2007 he has lived in Bethlehem, covering the North Country for NHPR in addition to freelancing on automotive topics for The New York Times. He enlisted in the Army in 1968 and spent 15 months as a combat photographer in Vietnam. He graduated from George Washington University with a degree in journalism.

Contact

Ways To Connect

Hearings before the state’s Site Evaluation Committee to decide whether to widen portions of a road leading to wind turbines in the North Country should be held in Coos County and not Concord, says Peter Roth, a senior assistant attorney general who represents the public interest before the S.E.C.

It is unfair to require interested citizens to travel to Concord, Roth wrote in a motion filed Monday. The trip can take three hours in good weather and it is expensive if an overnight stay is needed.

The White Mountain School

 

 

  The Vermont man accused of killing a California woman during a chance encounter in Littleton is pleading not guilty by reason of insanity. And, he has agreed to be placed in the psychiatric ward of the state prison.

Rodney Hill was charged with second degree murder in the death of 70-year-old Catherine Houghton, a trustee of the White Mountain School, who was visiting for a board meeting in January 2013.

Houghton and Hill had a chance encounter in the lobby of The Hampton Inn and Hill fatally stabbed Houghton.

 

The company that owns the wind farm near the Balsams is open to reducing the buffer zone between its wind turbines and the slopes, a key to a developer’s plan to  greatly expand  the size of the ski resort.

"As long as it is safe, we have no problems," Brookfield Renewable Power lawyer Harold Pachios said late Monday.

Maine entrepreneur Les Otten would like to quadruple the size of the Balsams ski area and reopen the hotel.

But Otten’s plan to make the ski runs longer requires skiers to get closer to the tops of mountains where the wind farm has turbines.

Two snowmobilers were rescued early Sunday morning in the North Country after their machines bogged down in deep snow, leaving them stranded, according to a news release from New Hampshire Fish and Game.

A 911 cellular call asking for help came about 10:30 Saturday night, said Conservation Office Chris Egan.

The callers couldn’t be reached in a return call, but it appeared the call came from an area near Pittsburg. Groomers from local clubs were notified and Egan headed to the area on his snowmobile.

Among the bills considered earlier this week by the legislature were proposals dealing with licensing outpatient abortion facilities; preventing communities from purchasing military-style vehicles and allowing more serious charges if a fetus dies as the result of a homicide.

Here is how North Country representatives voted:

LICENSING OUTPATIENT ABORTION FACILITIES

Only three of the eleven North Country reps voted against killing a bill that would have required licensing outpatient abortion facilities.

Northern Pass opponents are hoping a 7-year-old boy on YouTube will prompt people to sign a petition asking Gov. Hassan to fight harder against the project.

The YouTube video starts with the child, identified only as “Tucker,” listing his favorite trees.

It shows lovely scenery and then electric transmission towers appear.

About 6,400 people, businesses or organizations, with about 68 percent from New Hampshire, filed comments with the US Department of Energy about the controversial Northern Pass project and now the federal agency has issued a summary of the concerns.

The Department of Energy sought the comments as it considers whether to allow Northeast Utilities, the parent of Northern Pass, to bring electric power from Canada.

In the North Country Millsfield wants to regain a spot it held six decades ago: Being the first place to vote in the presidential election.

That goes back to just after midnight in November 1952 when the seven voters of Millsfield, which straddles Route 26 between Errol and the Dixville, cast the first votes in the presidential election, according to Time magazine article.

The Storm: Ho Hum

Mar 13, 2014

All in all it was a normal March snow storm, says Michael Ekster of the National Weather Service in Gray, Maine.

“The amounts varied greatly. Northern New Hampshire got anywhere from six to twelve inches of snow. Parts of Southern New Hampshire got a lot of rain and sleet.”

"It was pretty average. There weren't any ridiculously high totals."

Ekster said this morning should bring another one to three inches of snow with locally higher amounts in the mountains.

It was about two weeks ago that Stephen Dignazio, the executive director of the non-profit Colonial Theatre in Bethlehem, put the message on the marquee.

It said “Spring Is On The Way.”

It was a warm, fuzzy thought, but premature.

“I guess we made a misstep there,” said Dignazio.

With the snow getting heavier throughout the day Wednesday, cars churned up and down Main Street past the theater and that overly optimistic marquee

And Dignazio was not trying to escape the blame for the wintry assault.

Coos County commissioner Paul Grenier says there are plans to convert the Balsams into a huge ski resort.

D-Kuru/Wikimedia Commons

Those big stacks of wood pellets typically seen each fall in the parking lots of big box stores aren’t so easy to find right now. And, that’s posing a challenge for people like Andy Langlois of Berlin.

He heats with pellets and has become a hunter-gatherer.

“I had to start calling around as well as just stopping by places just to see if anybody has them and then how many they have,” he said.

Around the state stores like Lowe’s and Home Depot are often coming up short, spokeswomen for the companies acknowledged.

North Country Events

Feb 21, 2014

The newsletter typically announces events in the next week. The calendar shows you events in the coming months.

Nine of the 14 North Country representatives voting favored a bill under which New Hampshire employers could not prohibit their workers from discussing how much they are paid.

The bill, H.B. 1188, passed 183 – 125 on Wednesday and now goes to the Senate.

Supporters argued the bill is a step toward ensuring men and women are paid equally for comparable work.

Seven years ago 300 jobs were lost when the Wausau paper plant in Groveton closed. But now a Marlborough, Mass. company says it plans to open a new liquified natural gas plant at the site.

The new plant will cost about $100 million, says Evan Coleman, an official with Clear Energy, the developer.

“We take natural gas out of a pipeline, we cool it down to about negative 260 degrees which transforms the gas into a liquid and then we truck that product out to utility, industrial and transportation users within New England.”

More than two years ago the Balsams closed, putting about 300 full and part-time employees out of work.

But now Les Otten, a Maine businessman and former owner of the American Skiing Company, is working on reopening the Balsams.  He says he has an agreement with the resort’s two owners, Dan Hebert and Dan Dagesse.

There were five snowmobile crashes in the North Country Saturday, including two on rental machines, according to New Hampshire Fish and Game.

Three of the five accidents resulted in injuries and in two cases they were described as serious, according to Sergeant Mark Ober.

One happened about 11 a.m. near Whitefield. It involved Cydney Johnson, 42, of Alton who was on a guided tour. It is thought she accelerated by mistake, causing her snowmobile to hit a tree. She was taken by helicopter to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.

 Under pressure from New Hampshire’s congressional delegation, the U.S. Department of Energy says it will disclose which alternatives to the route favored by Northern Pass it plans to study. That is something opponents of the controversial project have been seeking.

Before the Northern Pass project can go forward it must be approved by the DOE. And, the core of that approval is an environmental impact statement. It will focus on the 187-mile route Northern Pass wants to use.

In the vote on whether to allow electronic Keno games to be played in the state sixteen North Country representatives were evenly split for and against, without any clear divide along party lines.

As NHPR’s Josh Rogers reported the Keno bill cleared the house by a 202-141 margin.

Under the bill, 92 percent of the proceeds would go to the state for education, with one percent of that earmarked for problem gambling programs.

A Berlin woman was killed Saturday night in a snowmobile accident, the second time in a week that there’s been a fatal snowmobile accident in the North Country.

Lucie Gagnon, 58, was killed just before 10 p.m. at Success Pond when she hit an embankment and large tree, Fish and Game Conservation Officer Mark Ober reported in a news release.

“Mrs. Gagnon suffered severe trauma as a result of the crash and died at the scene,” Ober said.

dearbarbie via Flickr CC

Berlin is on the way to becoming the first jurisdiction in the state to allow bars to take advantage of a new law and serve liquor until 2 a.m.

But Mayor Paul Grenier says the city council's decision has a downside.

“It is actually going to increase law-enforcement activity.”

And, an upside.

“We want to try to encourage and do everything we can to help our businesses in Berlin succeed.”

A 47-year-old Hudson woman died from injuries she sustained in a snowmobile accident near Pittsburg, according to a news release from New Hampshire Fish and Game.

Pauline Robinson was injured Tuesday when her snowmobile struck a tree on an icy section of trail, said Conservation Office Matthew Holmes.

A helicopter flew her to the Central Maine Medical Center where she died about 6 p.m. on Tuesday.

“Although this crash is still under investigation, authorities believe that an unintentional hit of the throttle was the primary cause of this crash,” Holmes said.

While the legislature considers whether to allow a $25 hiker’s card that would eliminate any chance of being charged for a rescue, a Michigan man is fighting a $9,300 bill for the help he got in 2012.

Earlier this month a judge in District Court in Concord decided Edward Bacon of Northville, Michigan was negligent. That meant he should reimburse New Hampshire Fish and Game for the cost of his rescue from the Franconia Ridge.

Only one representative from the North Country voted Wednesday against a bill that would encourage state regulators to give preference to electric transmission lines that are buried or located along public highways.

As NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown reported the House voted 171 – 139 for HB 569.

Chris Jensen

Voters in Executive Council District 1 went to the polls Tuesday in a primary over the seat held by Ray Burton, who died in November.

Three Republicans Mark Aldrich of Lebanon, Christopher Boothby of Meredith and, Joseph Kenney of Wakefield are vying to see who will face Hanover Democrat Michael Cryans in March.

In Littleton the turnout was extremely light, says Gerald Winn, the town moderator.

“We opened at eight this morning and we’re four and a half hours in and there are fifty people who voted.”

A Vermont man was killed in Errol Monday evening when a colleague drove into him with a logging truck, according to a news release from Troop F.

The accident occurred on Millsfield Pond Road, where the men were putting on tire chains.

The driver, Mike Doucette, 24, of Milan, thought 42-year-old Brian Young was clear of the truck and drove forward, hitting Young, according to state police. Young died at the scene.

The investigation is continuing and no charges have been filed.

Amid high winds and blowing snow, four people were rescued from above the treeline on Mount Washington before dawn Monday. But one rescuer said the group was lucky to get out a call for help.

"I think it would have been a bad outcome if they weren’t able to get the rescue call out,” Craig Taylor, a volunteer with the Mountain Rescue Service, told NHPR.

“Temperatures were expected to go below zero, winds were expected to ramp up to the triple digits that night. So, the forecast was really grim.”

Mt. Washington Auto Road / Flickr CC

  Searchers spent hours on Mount Washington Saturday night looking for - and locating - a lost ice climber, according to a news release from New Hampshire Fish and Game.

The call for help came about 5:30 pm from Ms. Dale Edwards, 32, of the Bronx in New York, who was climbing with two companions in the back country of the Ammonoosuc Ravine, according to Conservation Officer Matthew Holmes.

By roughly a three-to-one margin North Country representatives voted against legalizing marijuana.

As NHPR’s Ryan Lessard reported the debate over HB 492 had those in favor of legalizing the use of small amounts of marijuana saying marijuana was no different than drinking alcohol.

And, those opposed said there were “negative health impacts.”

COBAN Technologies

Nine of the 14 North Country representatives voting opposed allowing police to use license plate scanners, while five were in favor of the technology.

As NHPR’s Josh Rogers reported supporters – including the New Hampshire Chiefs of Police – argued scanners might help solve crimes, while opponents worried about privacy issues.

The bill authorizing scanners, House Bill 675, was defeated 250 – 97.

Pages