Danielle Kurtzleben

Danielle Kurtzleben is a political reporter assigned to NPR's Washington Desk. In her current role, she writes for npr.org's It's All Politics blog, focusing on data visualizations. In the run-up to the 2016 election, she used numbers to tell stories that went far beyond polling, putting policies into context and illustrating how they affected voters.

Before joining NPR in 2015, Kurtzleben spent a year as a correspondent for Vox.com. As part of the site's original reporting team, she covered economics and business news.

Prior to Vox.com, Kurtzleben was with U.S. News & World Report for nearly four years, where she covered the economy, campaign finance and demographic issues. As associate editor, she launched Data Mine, a data visualization blog on usnews.com.

A native of Titonka, Iowa, Kurtzleben has a bachelor's degree in English from Carleton College. She also holds a master's degree in Global Communication from George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs.

Updated Oct. 20 at 2:34 p.m. to include the Trump campaign's response to Karena Virginia's allegations.

The allegations against Donald Trump of inappropriate sexual behavior had quieted down, but on Thursday morning, another woman spoke up. The latest accuser, Karena Virginia, held a Thursday press conference with attorney Gloria Allred, in which Virginia alleged that Trump groped her in 1998.

Trump has thus far denied any of the incidents and has also threatened to sue the New York Times, which reported two of the most recent accusations.

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When we talk about evangelicals, who are we really talking about? Let's take a step back here with NPR political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben. She's been digging into the term and the numbers. Danielle, welcome to the studio.

When he released his medical records this month, Donald Trump appeared on the Dr. Oz show to reveal his health information. After doing a blase rundown of results, noting many of them "good" or "normal" or "low," Oz made one number stand out.

"Your testosterone is 441, which is actually --" Oz said, then paused. "It's good," he finished with a chuckle.

Trump gave a faint smile and a meaningful eyebrow raise. The crowd cheered.

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton said some things that were flat out untrue — or misleading — in the first presidential debate Monday night. (Check out NPR's comprehensive fact check here.)

In September of last year, Donald Trump released his first tax plan, but now he has made another go of it. Over the last couple of months, he has released an overhaul that changes rates and includes newly announced child care deductions. The revised plan would still cost the government trillions in revenues, according to a new analysis, though not as much as his last plan.

Donald Trump finally addressed whether he believes the current president was, indeed, born in the United States. "President Obama was born in the United States. Period," he said Friday morning.

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It's time now for Platform Check, where we examine what the candidates say they will do if they become president.

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HILLARY CLINTON: We should raise the national minimum wage.

The tables turned for Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton over the weekend. For much of the campaign, Clinton has been sitting back, staying quiet and allowing Trump's gaffes, offensive statements and flip-flops to take up the news cycle.

This week on the campaign trail, Donald Trump and his surrogates are being haunted by the ghost of comments past.

Specifically, allegations the Republican presidential nominee made five years ago that President Obama lied about his birthplace to make him eligible for the presidency. (Obama was born in Hawaii.)

It's a theory that those close to Trump — who was one of the most well-known "birthers" — have tried to distance from the candidate.

Donald Trump raised $90 million in August, the campaign said Thursday.

That's a "record" haul for the Trump campaign and its joint fundraising committees, the campaign bragged in a Thursday statement, but it's no match for Hillary Clinton, who raised $143 million in August, as her campaign reported last week.

You've heard it a bajillion times at this point: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are the two most unpopular major party presidential candidates on record. Both of them have unfavorability ratings of more than 50 percent.

But here's one more place that unpopularity pops up: the number of people who simply don't choose either candidate. Especially when you compare this election with 2012, a massive number of people are either choosing third-party candidates or simply have not yet decided.

Donald Trump will give a speech Wednesday outlining his immigration stance. Given the last week of news coverage, he could have some serious explaining to do.

An immigration policy centered around extreme positions — mass deportation of 11 million immigrants in the country illegally, plus building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border — initially helped Trump stand out in the massive Republican primary field.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are going to be all over America's TVs this week, but in very different ways.

Clinton has one day of campaigning on her schedule, plus an appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live. Trump, meanwhile, has four big rallies planned. And if the rest of the campaign has been any template, Trump's many speeches will get many minutes of airtime.

Donald Trump often questions whether Hillary Clinton is honest or trustworthy enough to be president. This week, he took up another line of attack: that Clinton is in failing health.

Claims about Clinton's health have circulated for years but have gained new traction recently, in part thanks to a comment by Trump and questions raised by Fox News host Sean Hannity.

Despite the vast differences between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, there were some striking similarities between the economic speeches they delivered this week. They both spoke in Michigan, where they both talked a lot about manufacturing, with both of them insisting that they would obtain fairer trade deals.

When Donald Trump's daughter, Ivanka, introduced her father at the Republican National Convention, she emphasized gender equality, advocating for more equal pay and more affordable childcare.

That came as a surprise to some; those points made her speech sound more Democratic than Republican, as NPR's Asma Khalid noted.

On Dec. 13, 2000, after perhaps the most hotly contested presidential election in American history (and a Supreme Court decision that divided Americans), Al Gore did one of the most important things that keeps American democracy working: he conceded.

Protesters holding up pocket constitutions were reportedly ejected from a Donald Trump rally in Portland, Maine on Thursday. Video from the rally shows protesters standing and holding the booklets in the air. Campaign staffers shortly thereafter removed the protesters, CNN reports.

On Tuesday as Hillary Clinton's was officially nominated as the first major party female presidential nominee, women (and yes, some men) all over the Wells Fargo Arena in Philadelphia danced, cried, embraced and howled with joy.

The Democratic National Convention erupted into a deafening celebration over a woman being thisclose to the presidency, 240 years after the U.S. was founded and nearly 100 years after women got the right to vote.

President Obama will make the case for Hillary Clinton Wednesday night with about as many Americans approving of him as disapprove of him.

That puts him somewhere in the middle of other outgoing presidents who have given convention speeches supporting their potential successors. Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan and Dwight Eisenhower were all relatively well liked when they left office. George W. Bush and Harry Truman, meanwhile, delivered their addresses even while their approval numbers were in the tank.

Bill Clinton had a formidable challenge on Tuesday: to sell the American people on one of the most disliked presidential nominees in U.S. history. He had to "humanize" her, in punditspeak — Hillary Clinton is more of an idea or icon to people than a person, as NPR's Steve Inskeep suggested Tuesday night.

Maryland Democratic Sen. Barbara Mikulski and Georgia Rep. John Lewis will formally nominate Hillary Clinton for the presidency on Tuesday night, PBS NewsHour's John Yang and NPR's Mara Liasson report.

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz had an abysmal weekend, and Monday morning started out no better for her.

Her fellow Floridians loudly booed her when she spoke at her home state's delegate breakfast Monday morning. And later the Democratic National Committee chairwoman confirmed she wouldn't even gavel in the start of the convention this afternoon in Philadelphia.

On Thursday night, Donald Trump will accept the Republican nomination for the presidency of the United States. His brash, outsider persona might signal that his convention speech will be...well, unconventional. But his campaign is saying his speech will in fact be modeled on one from nearly 50 years ago: Richard Nixon's 1968 nomination acceptance speech.

The 2016 presidential campaign feels like a political science dissertation (or 1,000) waiting to happen: two massively unpopular major-party presumptive nominees; a strong challenge for the Democratic nomination from a self-proclaimed "democratic socialist"; and the way that Donald Trump has conducted so much of his campaign via Twitter should provide Ph.D. candidates ample material for decades.

The Democrats on Friday released an outline of their upcoming convention, and one of the main goals appears to be showing off the party's unity after a long primary fight.

After a divisive primary season between presumptive nominee Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, the convention schedule includes a speech from Sanders on the first night, Monday, July 25. That night's theme is "United Together" — indeed, of the four nights' themes, three include the word "together."

Tim Tebow, Peter Thiel and precisely zero former Republican presidential nominees — that's who will reportedly be speaking at the Republican convention next week.

So many things about this election are unprecedented — and one of the most obvious is how much voters dislike the candidates. By now, everyone knows that this year features the two most unpopular presumptive major-party candidates on record.

Every presidential election manages to feel new somehow. Even amid the wall-to-wall cable coverage and poll frenzies and day-before-the-election, man-on-the-street interviews with still-undecided voters and shock (shock!) when a candidate flip-flops, every four years, there's a sense that this time — this time — is different. (Remember that whole recount thing?)

And then there's 2016.

In the runup to this election season, The Party Decides seemed to be on every political science nerd's reading list.

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