Dave Mistich

Dave Mistich is the Charleston Reporter for West Virginia Public Broadcasting. A native of Washington, West Virginia, Dave can be heard throughout week on West Virginia Public Radio, including during West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia. He also anchors local newscasts during Weekend Edition on Saturday mornings and covers the House of Delegates for The Legislature Today.

Since joining West Virginia Public Broadcasting in October of 2012, Dave has produced stories that range from the 2012 general election, the effects of Superstorm Sandy on Nicholas County and a feature on the burgeoning craft beer industry in the state. He has also contributed to NPR's newscasts upon three occasions thus far—covering the natural gas line explosion in Sissonville in December, U.S. Senator Jay Rockefeller's announcement that he won't seek reelection in 2014 and the murder of Mingo County Sheriff Eugene Crum.

In June 2013, his coverage of the Sissionville explosion won an award for Best Breaking News from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

Before coming to West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Dave worked as a freelancer for various newspapers and magazines locally and around the country, including Relix, The Charleston Daily Mail and PopMatters, where he focused exclusively on critiquing and writing about popular music. 

A graduate of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Dave holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio-Television Production & Management.  He is also finishing a Master of Arts Journalism degree there and is hopelessly trying to complete a thesis which focuses on America’s first critically-oriented rock magazine, Crawdaddy!

Environment
5:02 pm
Sat March 29, 2014

Review Of West Virginia Water Finds More Work To Be Done

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 6:59 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

A group of independent researchers has found that the chemical crude MCHM is still present in some West Virginia homes. That's the coal-cleaning chemical that spilled into the Elk River back in January out of a storage tank operated by the company Freedom Industries. The spill contaminated drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people. The research group was formed by West Virginia's governor after public pressure.

Dave Mistich of West Virginia Public Broadcasting reports on the research group's latest findings.

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Around the Nation
4:15 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

In The Wake Of Spill, West Virginians Still Don't Trust Their Tap

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 7:33 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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