Don Gonyea

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: Thank you.

>>INSKEEPIn this country, tomorrow, South Carolina holds it's Democratic primary. It's a chance for Hillary Clinton to benefit from her lead among African-American voters. Here's NPR's Don Gonyea.

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And, Renee, I loved being at Smokey Row, this coffee shop in Des Moines, Iowa, so much yesterday, I thought I would come back this morning. And there's a good crowd here, again - a room full of people watching us here.

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DON GONYEA, BYLINE: This is Don Gonyea. Satellite trucks lined the street outside the small auditorium at Drake University where Donald Trump's alternate programming for the night was taking place.

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Sarah Palin is back in the presidential race. Today, she endorsed Republican frontrunner Donald Trump.

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Former GOP presidential hopeful Linsdey Graham has announced his endorsement of Jeb Bush for president.

Graham's presidential campaign went nowhere, but as a senator from the early voting state of South Carolina he hopes to still have some clout.

Graham praised Bush's temperament Friday morning, following Thursday night's GOP debate. "He hasn't tried to get ahead in a contested primary by embracing demagoguery ... he's not running to be commander-in-chief by running people down," he said.

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Every four years in Iowa, about a month before the caucuses, something happens. People turn on the TV, and they are inundated with these.

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Here's a candidate for understatement of the year: The current presidential race has not exactly followed the script that the pundits, journalists and even that know-it-all news junkie at your book club or local diner predicted. You might say it was the year that conventional wisdom got humbled ... or Trumped.

The first, big moment of the 2016 race came just over a year ago, in the form of a tweet from the handle @JebBush:

Here's what Bush told TV station WPLG back then:

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Few presidential candidates go around invoking Richard Nixon. But that's exactly what GOP hopeful John Kasich does. It all goes back to a complaint Kasich had about his dorm room and a meeting with a university president 45 years ago.

The Republican presidential hopefuls debate in Las Vegas Tuesday night will be the first since the terrorist attacks in Paris and in San Bernardino, Calif. In recent weeks, ISIS and how to keep Americans safe have dominated the campaign and shot to the top of Americans' concerns.

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And NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea is in the studio with me, and he was just listening to Michael Signer there. And Don, what do you make of what you just heard? You cover a lot of Trump events.

At a campaign rally in Ohio on Monday, Donald Trump said once again that on the day of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks there were big, public celebrations by thousands of Muslims in New Jersey as they watched the twin towers collapse. The comments come despite denials by police and other New Jersey public officials — and the absence of news reports detailing such events of that day.

Monday's rally drew 14,000 people. It was Trump's first campaign stop in the presidential battleground state, and he opened with a classic Ohio State football cheer.

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