Emily Corwin

Seacoast Reporter

Emily Corwin is NHPR's Seacoast reporter, doing general assignment reporting across the region. She also covers the state's justice system, higher education, and this year, a good dose of primary politics.


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It’s a familiar scene: Carly Fiorina’s presidential campaign has a meet and greet at a lumber yard in Wentworth. Nitsa Ioannides and Kerry Marsh stand behind a table, greeting guests.  Ionnides hands you a red CARLY For America sticker and a brochure; Marsh might recommend a yard sign.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

Rand Paul has been visiting the New Hampshire campaign trail for a while now.  In a visit last September, he was full of vim and vigor, telling a Manchester bar packed with millennials, “When we proclaim our message with the passion of Patrick Henry, and we proclaim it like a man coming over the hill singing, then I think we’ll be the dominant movement again.”

Mark via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8mdNZs

Sanctuary Alternative Treatment Center plans run its cannabis dispensary in Plymouth, and its cultivation center – where plants are grown and processed --  in Rochester.  The cultivation center already complies with Rochester’s zoning ordinances, and does not need any further approval. Nevertheless, the Department of Health and Human Services held a public hearing there on Tuesday.  

Sanctuary CFO Josh Weaver began the evening in a defensive stance, promising the site will be secure and inconspicuous.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

There’s a constant stream of Republican candidates crisscrossing the Granite State these days. That makes standing out somewhat of a challenge. But Carly Fiorina is one candidate who seems to be headed in the right direction. 

If you've been following Fiorina's New Hampshire campaign over the past few months, you can see the crowds are getting bigger and enthusiastic. What’s the appeal?  Her supporters say she talks clearly, she answers the questions, and she never stumbles.

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Representatives of the US Air Force Wednesday tried to sooth anxious residents who were exposed to contaminated water on the former Pease Air Force Base.

Fifty residents and a 10-member community advisory made clear their demands for ongoing health monitoring. They asked the Air Force to repay the city of Portsmouth for extra water costs and to treat nearby wells more aggressively than planned.

For the most part, the four representatives of the Air Force  said: we hear you, but we can’t commit.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Sen. Kelly Ayotte is crisscrossing the state this week as Congress’s August recess comes to an end. A convenience store lobbying group brought her to a Cumberland Farms in Portsmouth Tuesday, where she donned an apron and sold customers everything from cigarettes to Mountain Dew.

After, the senator pushed back against an attack ad by the Planned Parenthood Action Fund. The advertisement, released last week, accurately states that Ayotte voted to defund Planned Parenthood.

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Emily Corwin

On Sunday, female activists in dozens of locations around the world went topless. Their goal: to encourage women to go topless anywhere that men do. To the dismay of local lawmakers, over 500 women signed up on Facebook to participate at a Hampton Beach event in New Hampshire. 

"It’s so rainy out. There’s some people on the beach not very many. But I did just see a woman walk by with a sweatshirt on but unzipped and nothing on underneath so I guess this is really happening here."

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Citizen activists in Portsmouth are asking the city and state to consider a ferry from the Port of New Hampshire to Provincetown. 

The group – which calls itself “Promote Our Port,” made its case at city hall. Their audience included a staffer from US Senator Jeanne Shaheen’s office, state Senator Martha Fuller-Clark, and City Manager John Bohenko.

For now the port is being used as a staging area for the new Sarah Long Bridge.

File Photo

The US Air Force will comply with an order from the Environmental Protection Agency to clean up groundwater at the Pease International Tradeport. A chemical family known as PFCs were discovered there, above the EPA threshold in the spring of 2014. 

In a statement, the Air Force Civil Engineer Center announced they had already resumed operation of a water treatment system; they have funded studies to evaluate new drinking water sites, and will develop wells to intercept the contaminants - -which are already leaching into the neighboring Harrison and Smith wells.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

One thing is clear as throngs of people wind down Alumni Drive on the way up to Winnacunnet High School in Hampton: these folks are not coming out just for the Donald Trump spectacle. They really want him to be president.

Courtesy Photo

Chris Rocket has been in prison for 19 years. His convictions are for second degree murder and robbery. The crimes, he says, were the result of an alcohol addiction.

His addiction to heroin and prescription drugs?

He got hooked on those while incarcerated at the state prison in Berlin.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul took a diagonal path from West Lebanon to Windham this weekend, making six stops in 36 hours. Tilton was his second-to-last stop of the day on Saturday.

The city of Portsmouth is trying to overturn a neighboring town’s approval of a controversial propane rail project. On Tuesday, a Superior Court judge heard arguments from attorneys on both sides.

The controversial Sea-3 rail expansion project would ship propane from fracking sites in the American West to their expanded Newington facility.  And it would run through Portsmouth. 

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Throughout the 2016 presidential season, NHPR will bring you profiles of the people and places behind the scenes of the New Hampshire Primary. We start with Geno's Chowder and Sandwich Shop, an iconic campaign stop in Portsmouth for candidates looking to meet voters - and maybe sample a lobster roll.

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The state Department of Health and Human Services says it's still determining if it can proceed with another round of blood tests for people exposed to contaminants at Pease International Tradeport in Portsmouth. 


A retired Portsmouth police officer who was placed under a gag order after talking to a local newspaper is suing the city, as well as the city’s Police Chief and Police Commission.

The police department put retired officer John Connors under a gag order almost a year ago, after he talked to the Portsmouth Herald about Detective Aaron Goodwin.

Goodwin inherited $2.7 million from an elderly Portsmouth woman who lived next door to Connors. Goodwin was fired last month after an independent investigation.  The inheritance is now pending in probate court.

The Port of New Hampshire will get $5 million to make it easier for ships to turn around.  The money is part of the state’s capital budget that Governor Hassan signed into law this week. The capital budget also includes increased funds for the new women's prison in Concord.

Port Project

Back in 1984, the Army Corps of Engineers recommended five port improvement projects. Four have been completed. With this additional $5 million from the capital budget paired with $14 million more from the feds, the final project can get underway. 

Sheryl Rich-Kern, NHPR

From now on, any community college student in the nation will automatically be accepted to New England College in Henniker. The private, 4-year college revealed their new enrollment policy this week.

Brad Poznanski, NEC’s director of admissions, says so long as the student is in good academic standing, no application is necessary.

In 2014, 18 out of 44 transfer students came to NEC’s on-campus program from community colleges.

Republican Presidential candidate Carly Fiorina is campaigning this week in New Hampshire. By some measures, the former Hewlett Packard CEO is doing very well compared to her primary opponents. But when it comes to pounding the pavement, she faces one basic challenge: introducing herself to voters.


Rockingham County will pay an $80,000 settlement to a whistleblower in the Attorney General's investigation of former prosecutor Jim Reams.  The settlement with Jerome Blanchard comes after Blanchard filed a claim against the county for wrongful termination. It includes $54,000 in lost pay and damages, and $26,000 in attorneys fees.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

On Sunday night, the U.S. Womens Soccer team goes up against Japan in the World Cup Final. Ten year old soccer player Abby Bentley of Newmarket is looking forward to the game. NHPR's Emily Coriwn met up with Bentley at a summer camp held by Seacoast United in Hampton, N.H.

Courtroom One Gavel
Joe Gratz / Flickr Creative Commons

Police and defense attorneys now have a second list of officers who – for more than two years- may not have been properly certified to give breath tests.

Mirko Isaia / Flickr, creative commons

Portsmouth will host its first Pride festival this weekend. Festival organizers say the festival has been in the works since early winter.  Now that the Supreme Court upheld gay marriage in all 50 states, Seacoast Outright board chair Chuck Rhoades says, "I think there’s a little extra oomph, a little extra joy, and another reason to celebrate."

Seacoast Outright is a nonprofit that supports LGBT youth.  The organization faced funding and volunteer shortages last year. With a new board and director, Rhoades says, the group is revitalizing. 

Emily Corwin / NHPR

For the first time this year, the Exeter Classic – a “criterium” style bike race – offered equal prize money in their pro women's race as their pro men’s race.  In September, the Portsmouth Criterium will also offer an equal purse to women for the first time.

Top female bike racers say regional race directors in New England and Northern California are pushing national and international governing bodies toward equality for women as they make room for women’s races and attract sponsors for equal prize money.

NHPR Staff

Funding for public higher education is a core issue in the budget battle now being waged between the Governor and the Legislature. Meanwhile, budget woes are brewing on the state's community college campuses, too, where students, faculty, and senior administrators don’t agree on how to balance the books.

State health officials have analyzed the first 100 out of about 500 blood samples taken from people exposed to a contaminant found in one of the wells on Pease International Tradeport.

The first 100 blood tests show concentrations of Perfluorochemicals PFOS and PFOA that are higher than the average American’s, but lower than other exposed groups like those drinking water downstream from a West Virginia DuPont factory.

New Hampshire Health And Human Services will discuss the results of the first 100 blood samples provided by individuals who spend time on the Pease Tradeport.  

A total of 433 people have been tested for the perfluorochemical “PFOS” after the city of Portsmouth discovered a high concentration of the contaminant in the Haven well on Pease.  The well has since been shut off.

Runs With Scissors via Flcikr/Creative Commons

USDA Undersecretary, Kevin Concannon visited New Hampshire this week to talk poverty and food policy with social service providers, meet with high school students, and visit a farmers market. I caught up with him and asked about local food and SNAP benefits; local food in schools -- and how behavioral economists are influencing the USDA's "Smarter Lunchrooms" program. 

Deborah Brown / https://www.facebook.com/pages/Strafford-County-Courthouse

Every year, police officers who operate breathalyzer equipment have to get re-certified through an online course. 

Over the last year and a half, a software error re-certified about 110 officers who may not have been given the entire test.