Emily Corwin

Seacoast Reporter

Emily Corwin is NHPR's Seacoast reporter, doing general assignment reporting across the region. She reports regularly on New Hampshire’s prison system, higher education, and regional politics. Previously, Emily worked on NPR's StateImpact project covering business & economy in New Hampshire. Emily received the 2013 Gracie Award for “Best Hard News Feature,” for her reporting on New Hampshire’s state prison for women.

Before coming to NHPR, Emily was the associate programmer for Public Radio Remix, with Roman Mars (of 99% Invisible). She hosted and produced Youthcast, a podcast from the Public Radio Exchange; and worked on other freelance projects in Boston. Emily studied cello performance and music composition at the California Institute of the Arts. She fell in love with public radio while schlepping between gigs on Los Angeles freeways.

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After almost a decade of unsympathetic leadership from Governors John Lynch and Craig Benson, all four major contenders for Governor support expanded gaming in one way or another. What does this mean for high stakes gambling in New Hampshire? Read more at StateImpact New Hampshire -- slideshow and all. 

Today, a legislative committee investigating pension privatization issued a request for information from several companies that manage retirement funds. Listen at StateImpact New Hampshire.

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New research out of the University of Georgia finds a significant increase in homicides in states that have what are known as Stand Your Ground laws. In June of 2011, the New Hampshire legislature became the 24th state in the nation to pass a Stand Your Ground Law – that’s a law that allows someone to fire a gun in self-defense, even when he or she can safely retreat. 

“Collaboration is the new competition,” State Representative Ray Gagnon said excitedly at the New Hampshire-Canada Economic Development Forum in Concord today. Listen to the story and read more at StateImpact New Hampshire.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

When celebrated Concord resident and high school teacher Christa McAuliffe died in the Challenger explosion in 1986, an out-of– state donor offered $500,000 to build a monument in downtown Concord. As then-mayor Jim MacKay remembers, the city declined. Instead, the state built a planetarium. Today – 26 years after the state opened the McAuliffe Planetarium — the facility is on its way to becoming a private, nonprofit institution.

Eighty-one percent of Coos County’s 2009 high school graduates say they don’t see job opportunities for themselves at home. And, more than 60 percent say they see those opportunities getting scarcer. That's according to the most recent survey results from the Carsey Institute's 10-year Coos Youth Study, published this week.

Go to StateImpact NH to read more and to trace venture deals across the country with our interactive map.

How to grow high tech in New Hampshire --- that’s a question a lot of people are asking these days.  Borealis Ventures, one of New Hampshire’s only venture firms, is teaming up with the state’s Business Finance Authority to get local capital in the hands of local innovators.

Emily Corwin

53 percent of small businesses in New Hampshire aren't online, says Jamie Hill, a Google spokesperson.  That, she says, is bad for Google, and bad for small businesses, too.  

Daquella Manera / <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/">Flickr</a>

At the end of May, convenience store clerk Jackie Whiton took a public stand against the unrestricted use of public assistance cash-benefits by refusing to sell cigarettes to a customer using an EBT card. Last week, House Speaker William O’Brien took up the cause. We want to know – how big a problem is this?

Emily Corwin

So far this year in New Hamsphire, more than 1100 people have become new U.S. citizens.  

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindfulone/268022096/">Mindful One</a> / Flickr

Tuesday, the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation celebrates its 50th year in operation. NHCF has staff in each region of the state, and raises funds from individuals, organizations and corporations, making approximately $30 million in nonprofit grants and scholarships annually.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Once upon a time, Laconia Bike Week was a rowdy affair with a lot of drinking and wild behavior.

Volunteers across the state will begin monitoring rivers for the invasive species, Didymo. 

 

The New Hampshire Rivers Council is launching a new program to train volunteers to report early signs of the cold-water-loving single-celled algae, known as rock snot.

The council’s Michele Tremblay says Didymo is now moving into the state’s rivers and streams.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/39794839@N03/5086437626/">HealthHomeHappy.com</a> / Flickr

Although Naturopathic Doctors (NDs) undergo virtually the same training as medical doctors, their services have hitherto not been covered by insurance companies in the state of New Hampshire. Two and a half years ago ND Bert Mathieson, frustrated by what struck him as “discrimination flat out,” got a sponsor for a bill that would change N.H. law. HB351 would require insurers in the state to reimburse naturopathic doctors, who emphasize illness prevention and lifestyle guidance rather than pharmaceutical or surgical procedures in their practice.

This Memorial Day weekend, the New Hampshire Division of Travel and Tourism predicts more than half a million visitors will flock to the state.  That’s an increase of two-percent over last year.

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