Emily Corwin

Seacoast Reporter

Emily Corwin is NHPR's Seacoast reporter, doing general assignment reporting across the region. She also covers the state's justice system, higher education, and this year, a good dose of primary politics.


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Emily Corwin / NHPR

Just as New Hampshire’s baby boomers are aging out of the workforce, the state’s used-to-be steady stream of educated newcomers just aren’t moving here at the same rates. This collision of factors strains state’s economy. That’s why – at the Division of Economic Development’s annual meeting – business and employee recruitment was a major topic of discussion.

This is the time of year when people all over the country are coming together and getting food to needy families, but for one community in Manchester, N.H., private acts of charity aren't just a holiday tradition — they are a display of anarchist and libertarian principles.

On a recent day, about 50 people gathered in a converted office space with $6,000 worth of food and a list of needy families. Mike Ruff, with help from a couple of kids, filled shopping bags with food for the hungry.

Marc Nozell for NHPR

Tuesday's election in New Hampshire made history, as two female candidates for Congress, Ann McLane Kuster and Carol Shea-Porter beat their Republican opponents, joining U.S. Senators Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) in Washington. 

Democratic Governor-Elect Maggie Hassan will be the only female Democratic governor in January. 


A victorious Maggie Hassan took the stage on Tuesday night to accept the state’s corner office.  She began by thanking voters for their trust – then launched into some specifics. "We will build a New Hampshire that will nurture innovation and entrepreneurs," Hassan said, "where businesses can and want to grow. Where young people will stay and work and create their own companies." 

Protecting New Hampshire from a broad-based sales or income tax has been a major issue in New Hampshire elections for decades – at least according to political scientist Dean Spiliotes.

"It goes back to the 1970s when Governor Meldrim Thomson pledged to veto any sales or income tax."

And this year’s races for Governor, and even Congress have been no different. 

But for all the talk around the income tax this season, the proposed constitutional amendment banning a personal income tax hasn’t gotten much attention.


Are you better off now than you were four years ago? StateImpact New Hampshire looks at key economic indicators to understand how Granite Staters are doing.  And it's not the same for everyone. If you're a business consultant, construction worker, nurse or public servant -- come see how you fit into the puzzle, and share your thoughts -- at StateImpact New Hampshire.

It’s looking pretty good, New Hampshire DOT spokesman Bill Boynton says, despite the many roads still closed because of fallen trees.  At least as far as infrastructure goes, there are no reports of major damage. Boynton says he was worried that sustained heavy rain would turn little brooks into raging torrents.

It’s that kind of speed along with gravity that can take its toll on culverts and roats and if it gets over the road it can compromise the road quickly and you can get severe washouts.

Hurricane Sandy brought commerce to a halt across the state today. Some economists will say hurricanes like Sandy produce enough economic activity to create a net gain. But they may not be taking into consideration what is known as The Broken Window Fallacy.

As of 7pm Monday night, parts of 129 municipal roads and 19 state roads are closed due to fallen trees and other obstructions.  The closures run from the Lakes Region, South.

Jim VanDongen at the Office of Emergency Management says Granite Staters should be aware of potential road closures in the morning:

This is going to continue all night and people just need to be aware there’s a possibility that roads will be closed and obviously they will be blocked with barricades and that sort of thing.

The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard has prepared for Hurricane Sandy.  There are three ships on the premises now. The Shipyard’s commander, Captain Bryant Fuller, says two of them are safe from Sandy in their dry dock.   Bryant says one ship -- the ex-USS Memphis -- is tied to the pier, and exposed to the elements: 

Emily Corwin / NHPR

If Congress cannot agree on a deficit reduction deal by January, a series of automatic tax increases and spending cuts known as the “fiscal cliff” will kick in. Today, a national bipartisan has launched in New Hampshire to make sure that doesn’t happen.

After a bipartisan debt-reduction plan commissioned by President Obama failed to gain support in Congress, its authors – Republican former Senator Alan Simpson and Democrat Erskine Bowles – went grassroots. They started the Fix The Debt Campaign -- a national group with state chapters.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Maggie Hassan is working the room, shaking hands with members of the Seacoast’s financial industry at the largest rotary club in New England – in Portsmouth.

She’s 54, and running for Governor on a platform of investment in education and job training, and healthcare expansion.

The 12th annual New Hampshire Film Festival will run from Thursday through Sunday this week at venues throughout Portsmouth. There will be question and answer sessions for audience members and workshops for filmmakers alongside the screenings of independent films. Nicole Gregg is the executive director of the New Hampshire Film festival. She says there are too many films showing to choose favorites.

The 65th annual fall foliage festival took place in Warner, New Hampshire this weekend. Attendees could purchase crafts by local artisans, go on rides, or share a country breakfast the United Church of Warner.

More aging adults are stepping out on a limb and starting their own businesses, says a report from the Kauffman Foundation. In New Hampshire, the Small Business Association and AARP are working together to make sure these so-called “encore entrepreneurs” have the tools they need.

The recession had hit by the time Joyce Goodwin finished her temporary position as director of a school in Hudson. She was 54, and couldn’t find another job.  

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/whiskeyandtears/2212224985/">whiskey and tears</a> / flickr

This week, New Hampshire’s Department of Health and Human Services identified the season’s first case of influenza. Beth Daly, chief of infectious disease surveillance at DHHS, is encouraging Granite Staters to get vaccinated.

"It’s not too early to be vaccinated," Daly says, "and the flu vaccine this year does contain different strains of the virus, so it’s important that people be vaccinated this year even if they were vaccinated last year as well."  

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Maggie Hassan says she will create a panel of lawmakers, state agencies and economists to build consensus around budget numbers. 

It would be called the Consensus Revenue Estimating Panel, Gubernatorial candidate Maggie Hassan told members of the Portsmouth Rotary Club on Thursday.  During her lunchtime address at  the Portsmouth Country Club, Hassan said the panel will help provide lawmakers with accurate budget numbers that they can agree on.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

When StateImpact reporter Emily Corwin set out to understand what the slogan 'we built this' means for business and the economy in New  Hampshire, she thought she’d find a lot of disagreement. But in the end – it didn’t work out that way.

Ben McLeod / Flickr

The University System of New Hampshire’s board of trustees is requesting that the legislature restore its state funding. At a board meeting Tuesday they approved a budget request for the near-$50 million that was cut last year.  In exchange for the funds, the USNH is offering to freeze tuition for two years.   

University chancellor Ed MacKay says that New Hampshire’s tuition costs are among the nation’s highest not because of inefficiencies, but because of a lack of funding from the state.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Democrat Maggie Hassan won the Democratic nomination for Governor at the Puritan Conference Center in Manchester last night. She says she’s ready to face Ovide Lamontagne, whom she called “the tea party favorite.”

Hassan brought up issues from  payday loans, to education and womens’ health:

Under my opponent’s version of live free or die, abortion would be illegal, even for the victims of rape or incest, and women and their doctors would be treated as criminals.

Emily Corwin / New Hampshire Public Radio

Maggie Hassan gave her acceptance speech at her victory party tonight in Manchester, comparing her stance on free kindergarten and abortion rights with her now-opponent, Ovide Lamontagne.  Her biggest round of applause came when she announced that "women should be able to make our own health-care decisions." She continued by thanking her family and supporters.

Emily Corwin / New Hampshire Public Radio

A crowd is forming at the Hassan victory party, although not all attendees are entirely enthusiastic.  Alex Cohen of Dover came to the Hassan victory party with his friend Linda, a campaign volunteer from Newmarket.  He's sporting a Hassan campaign sticker, but says "I always find myself voting for the lesser of two evils."

Emily Corwin / New Hampshire Public Radio

Long-time friends and supporters of Maggie Hassan are early attendees at the Hassan camp at the Puritan Conference Center in Manchester. Nancy Rockwell, Hassan's pastor, waits to give Hassan a bouquet of pink roses, with Chaplain Sue Goodspeed.

Across the room, long-time friends of Hassan's family Sue Ratnoff and Lynda Beck gaze at a television, above the podium.  "We're more than friends," Ratnoff says. "We know she's honest.  And by the way, she'd make a terrific governor."

We took 10 questions to all six candidates for governor -- and have organized it all for you right here

Are you a visual person? Check out the notes NHPR reporter Emily Corwin jotted down to compare each candidate's responses on the issues.

Want to see the details? Read each candidate's positions in his/her own words.

'eggroll' of Flickr

New Hampshire’s House and Senate have together passed two separate bills legalizing medical marijuana. Governor Lynch vetoed both. Now, as gubernatorial candidates vie to fill his seat, a medical marijuana bill could finally make it past the governor’s desk.

To date, 17 states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana.  In 2009, President Obama encouraged federal prosecutors to respect these states’ laws – despite the fact that the substance is illegal on a federal level.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

This year, Labor day weekend was a time not just to celebrate workers in America – but to celebrate… Elvis.  Crowds of Elvis Fans attended a three day Elvis festival and competition in Manchester, cheering on twenty Elvis Tribute Artists as they vied for #1 – and a chance to go on to compete in the Ultimate Elvis Presley Tribute Artist Contest next August in Memphis, Tennessee.  

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The AFL-CIO of New Hampshire held its annual Labor Day breakfast at St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Manchester this morning.  More than three hundred working men and women gathered to hear from Governor Lynch, Employment Security commissioner George Copadis, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, and others. 

The event’s featured guest and keynote speaker was AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, who says she came to New Hampshire not just to recognize New Hampshire’s workers, but to encourage them to get involved in the upcoming presidential and local elections.

Emily Corwin

About 50 people gathered around a flatscreen television at Albert Letizio’s sales and marketing business in Windham last night, for a convention watch party held by the Republican National Committee.  Next door in the kitchen, another dozen helped themselves to heaps of food and giant pans of cookies.

They were there to watch the Republican National Convention, in Tampa – in particular to cheer on Senator Kelly Ayotte, and Hudson businessman Jack Gilchrist, a featured speaker.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

After almost a decade of unsympathetic leadership from Governors John Lynch and Craig Benson, all four major contenders for Governor support expanded gaming in one way or another. What does this mean for high stakes gambling in New Hampshire? Read more at StateImpact New Hampshire -- slideshow and all.