Emily Corwin

Seacoast Reporter

Emily Corwin is NHPR's Seacoast reporter, doing general assignment reporting across the region. She also does beat reporting on the state's justice system. Emily reports regularly on New Hampshire’s prison system, higher education, and regional politics. Previously, Emily worked on NPR's StateImpact project covering business & economy in New Hampshire. Emily received the 2013 Gracie Award for “Best Hard News Feature,” for her reporting on New Hampshire’s state prison for women.

Before coming to NHPR, Emily was the associate programmer for Public Radio Remix, with Roman Mars (of 99% Invisible). She hosted and produced Youthcast, a podcast from the Public Radio Exchange; and worked on other freelance projects in Boston. Emily studied cello performance and music composition at the California Institute of the Arts. She fell in love with public radio while schlepping between gigs on Los Angeles freeways.

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The University System of New Hampshire’s board of trustees is requesting that the legislature restore its state funding. At a board meeting Tuesday they approved a budget request for the near-$50 million that was cut last year.  In exchange for the funds, the USNH is offering to freeze tuition for two years.   

University chancellor Ed MacKay says that New Hampshire’s tuition costs are among the nation’s highest not because of inefficiencies, but because of a lack of funding from the state.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Democrat Maggie Hassan won the Democratic nomination for Governor at the Puritan Conference Center in Manchester last night. She says she’s ready to face Ovide Lamontagne, whom she called “the tea party favorite.”

Hassan brought up issues from  payday loans, to education and womens’ health:

Under my opponent’s version of live free or die, abortion would be illegal, even for the victims of rape or incest, and women and their doctors would be treated as criminals.

Emily Corwin / New Hampshire Public Radio

Maggie Hassan gave her acceptance speech at her victory party tonight in Manchester, comparing her stance on free kindergarten and abortion rights with her now-opponent, Ovide Lamontagne.  Her biggest round of applause came when she announced that "women should be able to make our own health-care decisions." She continued by thanking her family and supporters.

Emily Corwin / New Hampshire Public Radio

A crowd is forming at the Hassan victory party, although not all attendees are entirely enthusiastic.  Alex Cohen of Dover came to the Hassan victory party with his friend Linda, a campaign volunteer from Newmarket.  He's sporting a Hassan campaign sticker, but says "I always find myself voting for the lesser of two evils."

Emily Corwin / New Hampshire Public Radio

Long-time friends and supporters of Maggie Hassan are early attendees at the Hassan camp at the Puritan Conference Center in Manchester. Nancy Rockwell, Hassan's pastor, waits to give Hassan a bouquet of pink roses, with Chaplain Sue Goodspeed.

Across the room, long-time friends of Hassan's family Sue Ratnoff and Lynda Beck gaze at a television, above the podium.  "We're more than friends," Ratnoff says. "We know she's honest.  And by the way, she'd make a terrific governor."

We took 10 questions to all six candidates for governor -- and have organized it all for you right here

Are you a visual person? Check out the notes NHPR reporter Emily Corwin jotted down to compare each candidate's responses on the issues.

Want to see the details? Read each candidate's positions in his/her own words.

'eggroll' of Flickr

New Hampshire’s House and Senate have together passed two separate bills legalizing medical marijuana. Governor Lynch vetoed both. Now, as gubernatorial candidates vie to fill his seat, a medical marijuana bill could finally make it past the governor’s desk.

To date, 17 states and the District of Columbia have legalized medical marijuana.  In 2009, President Obama encouraged federal prosecutors to respect these states’ laws – despite the fact that the substance is illegal on a federal level.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

This year, Labor day weekend was a time not just to celebrate workers in America – but to celebrate… Elvis.  Crowds of Elvis Fans attended a three day Elvis festival and competition in Manchester, cheering on twenty Elvis Tribute Artists as they vied for #1 – and a chance to go on to compete in the Ultimate Elvis Presley Tribute Artist Contest next August in Memphis, Tennessee.  

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The AFL-CIO of New Hampshire held its annual Labor Day breakfast at St. George Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Manchester this morning.  More than three hundred working men and women gathered to hear from Governor Lynch, Employment Security commissioner George Copadis, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, and others. 

The event’s featured guest and keynote speaker was AFL-CIO Secretary-Treasurer Liz Shuler, who says she came to New Hampshire not just to recognize New Hampshire’s workers, but to encourage them to get involved in the upcoming presidential and local elections.

Emily Corwin

About 50 people gathered around a flatscreen television at Albert Letizio’s sales and marketing business in Windham last night, for a convention watch party held by the Republican National Committee.  Next door in the kitchen, another dozen helped themselves to heaps of food and giant pans of cookies.

They were there to watch the Republican National Convention, in Tampa – in particular to cheer on Senator Kelly Ayotte, and Hudson businessman Jack Gilchrist, a featured speaker.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

After almost a decade of unsympathetic leadership from Governors John Lynch and Craig Benson, all four major contenders for Governor support expanded gaming in one way or another. What does this mean for high stakes gambling in New Hampshire? Read more at StateImpact New Hampshire -- slideshow and all. 

Today, a legislative committee investigating pension privatization issued a request for information from several companies that manage retirement funds. Listen at StateImpact New Hampshire.

Flickr/storem

New research out of the University of Georgia finds a significant increase in homicides in states that have what are known as Stand Your Ground laws. In June of 2011, the New Hampshire legislature became the 24th state in the nation to pass a Stand Your Ground Law – that’s a law that allows someone to fire a gun in self-defense, even when he or she can safely retreat. 

“Collaboration is the new competition,” State Representative Ray Gagnon said excitedly at the New Hampshire-Canada Economic Development Forum in Concord today. Listen to the story and read more at StateImpact New Hampshire.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

When celebrated Concord resident and high school teacher Christa McAuliffe died in the Challenger explosion in 1986, an out-of– state donor offered $500,000 to build a monument in downtown Concord. As then-mayor Jim MacKay remembers, the city declined. Instead, the state built a planetarium. Today – 26 years after the state opened the McAuliffe Planetarium — the facility is on its way to becoming a private, nonprofit institution.

Eighty-one percent of Coos County’s 2009 high school graduates say they don’t see job opportunities for themselves at home. And, more than 60 percent say they see those opportunities getting scarcer. That's according to the most recent survey results from the Carsey Institute's 10-year Coos Youth Study, published this week.

Go to StateImpact NH to read more and to trace venture deals across the country with our interactive map.

How to grow high tech in New Hampshire --- that’s a question a lot of people are asking these days.  Borealis Ventures, one of New Hampshire’s only venture firms, is teaming up with the state’s Business Finance Authority to get local capital in the hands of local innovators.

Emily Corwin

53 percent of small businesses in New Hampshire aren't online, says Jamie Hill, a Google spokesperson.  That, she says, is bad for Google, and bad for small businesses, too.  

Daquella Manera / <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/daquellamanera/">Flickr</a>

At the end of May, convenience store clerk Jackie Whiton took a public stand against the unrestricted use of public assistance cash-benefits by refusing to sell cigarettes to a customer using an EBT card. Last week, House Speaker William O’Brien took up the cause. We want to know – how big a problem is this?

Emily Corwin

So far this year in New Hamsphire, more than 1100 people have become new U.S. citizens.  

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/mindfulone/268022096/">Mindful One</a> / Flickr

Tuesday, the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation celebrates its 50th year in operation. NHCF has staff in each region of the state, and raises funds from individuals, organizations and corporations, making approximately $30 million in nonprofit grants and scholarships annually.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Once upon a time, Laconia Bike Week was a rowdy affair with a lot of drinking and wild behavior.

Volunteers across the state will begin monitoring rivers for the invasive species, Didymo. 

 

The New Hampshire Rivers Council is launching a new program to train volunteers to report early signs of the cold-water-loving single-celled algae, known as rock snot.

The council’s Michele Tremblay says Didymo is now moving into the state’s rivers and streams.

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/39794839@N03/5086437626/">HealthHomeHappy.com</a> / Flickr

Although Naturopathic Doctors (NDs) undergo virtually the same training as medical doctors, their services have hitherto not been covered by insurance companies in the state of New Hampshire. Two and a half years ago ND Bert Mathieson, frustrated by what struck him as “discrimination flat out,” got a sponsor for a bill that would change N.H. law. HB351 would require insurers in the state to reimburse naturopathic doctors, who emphasize illness prevention and lifestyle guidance rather than pharmaceutical or surgical procedures in their practice.

This Memorial Day weekend, the New Hampshire Division of Travel and Tourism predicts more than half a million visitors will flock to the state.  That’s an increase of two-percent over last year.

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