Erika Janik

Executive Producer

Credit Dutcher Photography

Erika Janik fell into radio after volunteering at Wisconsin Public Radio to screen listener calls. She co-founded and was the executive producer of “Wisconsin Life” on Wisconsin Public Radio for seven years.

Trained as a historian, she’s the author of six books, including Pistols and Petticoats: 175 Years of Lady Detectives in Fact and Fiction, and freelances for a variety of publications. She has an MA in American history and an MA in Journalism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Ways to Connect

In 1859, a Mrs. H.E. Wilson published a novel at her own expense. The book told the story of a biracial girl named Frado abandoned by her mother to be raised by a prominent family where she suffered verbal and physical abuse at the hand of her employers in a New Hampshire town famous for its abolitionist activities.

The novel didn’t sell well - likely less than 100 copies - and the book as well as its author fell into obscurity.

New Hampshire loves its vanity plates. We were supposedly the first state to offer them and rank second in the nation (behind Virginia) in the number of vanity plates on the road. There's even a NH License Plate Museum.

Our own parking lot at NHPR is filled with vanity plates. 

Elmire Jolicoeur
FindAGrave

There’s a story out there… a story you’ll find on dozens, maybe hundreds of websites, about the invention of the casserole:

“In 1866, Elmire Jolicoeur, a French Canadian immigrant, invented the precursor of the modern casserole in Berlin, New Hampshire.”

That’s from Wikipedia. If you don’t trust Wikipedia, you can also find this attribution in print, too.

LEF Foundation

New Hampshire is known for its charming small towns but some places are really, really small. Our listener Samer Kalaf wondered: just how small does it get?