Eyder Peralta

Eyder Peralta is NPR's East Africa correspondent based in Nairobi, Kenya.

He is responsible for covering the region's people, politics, and culture. In a region that vast, that means Peralta has hung out with nomadic herders in northern Kenya, witnessed a historic transfer of power in Angola, ended up in a South Sudanese prison, and covered the twists and turns of Kenya's 2017 presidential elections.

Previously, he covered breaking news for NPR, where he covered everything from natural disasters to the national debates on policing and immigration.

Peralta joined NPR in 2008 as an associate producer. Previously, he worked as a features reporter for the Houston Chronicle and a pop music critic for the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville, FL.

Through his journalism career, he has reported from more than a dozen countries and he was part of the NPR teams awarded the George Foster Peabody in 2009 and 2014. His 2016 investigative feature on the death of Philando Castile was honored by the National Association of Black Journalists and the Society for News Design.

Peralta was born amid a civil war in Matagalpa, Nicaragua. His parents fled when he was a kid, and the family settled in Miami. He's a graduate of Florida International University.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

(This post was updated at 2:11 p.m. ET.)

Puerto Rico's governor, Alejandro García Padilla, has declared a state of emergency over a power outage that at its peak affected 1.5 million customers.

By morning that number had been cut by a couple hundred thousand, but more than a million customers on the island remained without electricity.

Updated 8 p.m. ET with fire extinguished

The Associated Press reports that a fire that had cut off electricity to much of Puerto Rico has been extinguished. Local authorities say that most power is expected to be restored by Thursday morning.

The AP added this:

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative just announced one of its biggest investments to date: It is ponying up more than $3 billion to kickstart "Chan Zuckerberg Science," an initiative that plans to bring together multidisciplinary teams of scientists in an effort to prevent, cure or manage "all diseases in our children's lifetime."

These two guys may have accidentally disabled a pressure cooker bomb that was left on a sidewalk in Manhattan:

The FBI field office in New York just released that still from surveillance video because they want to talk to the men.

According to Jim Waters, the New York Police Department's counterterrorism bureau chief, the men picked up a piece of luggage that was left on the streets of New York this past weekend. They took out a pressure cooker bomb that was inside, but took off with the luggage.

Authorities have filed federal charges against Ahmad Khan Rahami, the sole suspect in the weekend bombings in Manhattan and New Jersey.

The charges include use of a weapon of mass destruction, bombing a public place and destruction of property. Rahami previously had been charged in New Jersey in connection with the shootout that led to his arrest Monday.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission issued a formal recall of 1 million Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones on Thursday.

During a press conference, Chairman Elliot Kaye said consumers should "take advantage of this recall right away" because the phone represents such a "serious fire hazard."

Kaye said consumers should check the identifying number on the back of the phone at Samsung.com to determine whether their phone has a defective battery.

Republican politicians in North Carolina are lashing out at the NCAA after the sanctioning body announced it was relocating seven championship sporting events because of a state law limiting civil rights protections for LGBT people.

The law, known as HB2, has drawn wide condemnation and had already cost the state the 2017 NBA All-Star game.

A more than 160-year-old Arctic mystery has come to resolution: The HMS Terror, a vessel from a doomed Royal Navy exploration to chart an unnavigated portion of the Northwest Passage, has been found, Aleta Brooke, operations manager for the Arctic Research Foundation said.

The Guardian, which first reported the story, said the vessel is in "perfect condition." The paper reports:

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers says it does not oppose the temporary halt of construction on the Dakota Access Pipeline, a $3.8 billion oil pipeline slated to run through four states, including North Dakota.

As we've reported, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe opposes the pipeline because it fears it could disturb sacred sites and affect the drinking water.

A demonstration against the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota turned violent on Saturday.

Demonstrators supporting the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe faced off with private security officers from Dallas-based Energy Transfer Partners.

Video from the scene showed security officers threatening protesters with dogs.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump met with President Enrique Peña Nieto at the president's official resident in Mexico City.

It was a hastily arranged visit by a presidential candidate who has spent much of his campaign insulting Mexico and its people.

One of the Islamic State's top commanders and the man in charge of disseminating its propaganda was killed in Aleppo, Syria, the group's semi-official Amaq news service announced.

Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, the news service said, was "martyred while surveying the operations to repel the military campaigns against Aleppo."

The report did not list a cause of death.

Juan Gabriel, a singular superstar who transcended borders and the trappings of gender with meticulously crafted pop songs and a flamboyant showmanship that earned him the nickname the "divo of Juarez," has died, according to the Los Angeles County Department of Medical Examiner.

Juan Gabriel was 66 years old and he was found at a residence in Santa Monica with no apparent foul play.

Australia's immigration minister is playing down allegations of abuse against children on the island nation of Nauru.

This week, The Guardian released a cache of more than 2,000 complaints that detail allegations of horrifying conditions in a refugee camp funded by Australia. Complaints from children were over represented in the database.

The Guardian reported:

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Israel indicted an employee of the United Nations Development Programme on Tuesday, alleging that he helped the militant group Hamas.

This news comes just days after Israel accused a World Vision employee of funneling millions to Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip.

Haaretz reports:

NASA has developed a special camera that lets you actually see the details of a fiery plume emanating from a space rocket. In the past, cameras have a hard time adjusting their exposure to something so intense, so all you often see is an overexposed jet of fire.

A giant political scandal in Pennsylvania is beginning a new chapter: Outgoing Attorney General Kathleen Kane heads to trial today over charges of, among other things, perjury and obstruction.

If you remember, this case stems from a convoluted political scandal that started shortly after Kane took office in 2013 promising to review how officials handled the Jerry Sandusky child abuse case.

We will get back to the news in a minute. But first, a public service announcement from the Philadelphia mayor's office regarding dumpster pools.

It comes from Karen Guss, communications director for the Department of Licenses and Inspections, who told The Two-Way that it was "just another day for us":

The U.S. Supreme Court is temporarily blocking a transgender male high school student in Virginia from using the boy's bathroom.

The U.S. State Department is dismissing a newspaper report that links a $400 million cash payment to the release of American prisoners, including Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian, by Iran.

The Delaware Supreme Court has decided that the state's death penalty law violates the Sixth Amendment.

The court was responding to a U.S. Supreme Court decision from a case in January — Hurst v. Florida — that found that Florida's death penalty law violated the Constitution because it gave judges — not juries — ultimate power to impose the death penalty.

New York City Police Commissioner William J. Bratton announced that he plans to step down next month, probably marking an end to a 45-year career in public service.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Chief of Department James O'Neill, a commander who began his work as a transit officer in 1983, will take over as commissioner.

Bratton, 68, acknowledged that now is a "challenging time" for policing, but he said things were headed in the right direction.

Bratton said they were working on making a transition from "being the police to being your police."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Here's something you've probably heard a lot already about the Democratic vice presidential candidate - Tim Kaine speaks Spanish.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

TIM KAINE: (Speaking Spanish).

(APPLAUSE)

Editor's Note: This piece contains language that some readers may find offensive.

It was a hot day in Cleveland at the height of the Republican National Convention and Stevedore Crawford Jr. was angry. He stomped through the city sweating through his white T-shirt, stopping at corners to denounce police. Right next to him was his young daughter, wearing the same camouflage pants as her dad. She also wore the same white T-shirt, scrawled with Tamir Rice's name.

Tamir was a 12-year-old boy killed by Cleveland police in November 2014.

History was made at the Democratic National Convention this past week. Hillary Clinton, as the first female presidential candidate of a major U.S. party, is officially embarking an unprecedented American political campaign.

We asked women — as young as 4 and as old 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision. Listen:

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

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