Eyder Peralta

Israel indicted an employee of the United Nations Development Programme on Tuesday, alleging that he helped the militant group Hamas.

This news comes just days after Israel accused a World Vision employee of funneling millions to Hamas, which controls the Gaza Strip.

Haaretz reports:

NASA has developed a special camera that lets you actually see the details of a fiery plume emanating from a space rocket. In the past, cameras have a hard time adjusting their exposure to something so intense, so all you often see is an overexposed jet of fire.

A giant political scandal in Pennsylvania is beginning a new chapter: Outgoing Attorney General Kathleen Kane heads to trial today over charges of, among other things, perjury and obstruction.

If you remember, this case stems from a convoluted political scandal that started shortly after Kane took office in 2013 promising to review how officials handled the Jerry Sandusky child abuse case.

We will get back to the news in a minute. But first, a public service announcement from the Philadelphia mayor's office regarding dumpster pools.

It comes from Karen Guss, communications director for the Department of Licenses and Inspections, who told The Two-Way that it was "just another day for us":

The U.S. Supreme Court is temporarily blocking a transgender male high school student in Virginia from using the boy's bathroom.

The U.S. State Department is dismissing a newspaper report that links a $400 million cash payment to the release of American prisoners, including Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian, by Iran.

The Delaware Supreme Court has decided that the state's death penalty law violates the Sixth Amendment.

The court was responding to a U.S. Supreme Court decision from a case in January — Hurst v. Florida — that found that Florida's death penalty law violated the Constitution because it gave judges — not juries — ultimate power to impose the death penalty.

New York City Police Commissioner William J. Bratton announced that he plans to step down next month, probably marking an end to a 45-year career in public service.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Chief of Department James O'Neill, a commander who began his work as a transit officer in 1983, will take over as commissioner.

Bratton, 68, acknowledged that now is a "challenging time" for policing, but he said things were headed in the right direction.

Bratton said they were working on making a transition from "being the police to being your police."

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Editor's Note: This piece contains language that some readers may find offensive.

It was a hot day in Cleveland at the height of the Republican National Convention and Stevedore Crawford Jr. was angry. He stomped through the city sweating through his white T-shirt, stopping at corners to denounce police. Right next to him was his young daughter, wearing the same camouflage pants as her dad. She also wore the same white T-shirt, scrawled with Tamir Rice's name.

Tamir was a 12-year-old boy killed by Cleveland police in November 2014.

History was made at the Democratic National Convention this past week. Hillary Clinton, as the first female presidential candidate of a major U.S. party, is officially embarking an unprecedented American political campaign.

We asked women — as young as 4 and as old 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision. Listen:

Hillary Clinton accepted her party's nomination on Thursday, completing the field for an American political campaign without historical precedent.

Clinton, the first female presidential nominee for a major American party, has now officially become Republican Donald Trump's Democratic rival for the presidency of the United States.

Hilda Solis, former U.S. labor secretary, took the stage at a meeting of the Hispanic caucus in Philadelphia this week and immediately launched into Spanish.

Solis, who is the first Latina to have served in a cabinet position, issued a ringing endorsement of the vice presidential candidate on the Democratic ticket.

"We are here to support Tim Kaine, our next vice president," she said. "Que habla muy bien Español. Mejor que yo!" (Who speaks good Spanish, she said, Better than I do.)

During our time covering the Republican National Convention in Cleveland this week, we asked pretty much everyone we met why they were supporting Donald Trump.

Here are some of their answers:

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Members of the delegation from Texas, Sen. Ted Cruz's home state, looked shellshocked in the concourse of the Quicken Loans Arena Wednesday night.

Cruz had just delivered a nighttime speech in which he did not endorse Donald Trump. Instead, he told the Republican National Convention to "vote your conscience." As he walked off the stage, the crowd booed.

After a night spent hammering Hillary Clinton, Day 3 of the GOP convention is being billed as a day where party leaders will lay out "the Republican vision for a new century of American leadership and excellence."

The legal scholar Richard Posner points out in The Little Book Of Plagiarism that The Bard himself was a "formidable plagiarist."

In one celebrated scene in Anthony and Cleopatra, Shakespeare borrows heavily from Plutarch's Life of Mark Antony. That borrowing extends to modern literature and even the visual arts, Posner argues.

Clayton Allen, 21, walked right up to the 8-foot fence surrounding the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland.

He drove from Kentucky and he stood out from the crowd because he had a handgun strapped to his hip.

"I open-carry all the time," Allen said. "The Republican convention would not be the exception."

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Philando Castile's trouble with traffic stops began when he still had his learner's permit. He was stopped a day before his 19th birthday.

From there, he descended into a seemingly endless cycle of traffic stops, fines, court appearances, late fees, revocations and reinstatements in various jurisdictions.

Court records raise big questions: Was Castile targeted by police? Or was he just a careless or unlucky driver?

Dallas Police Chief David Brown held a wide-ranging press conference on Monday, where he touched on race, the investigation and the issue of guns.

In a dramatic moment, he urged legislators to do their jobs and propose new laws to combat gun violence.

"We're doing ours. We're putting our lives on the line," Brown said. "The other aspects of government need to step up and help us."

With that, here are five pieces of audio from that press conference you should listen to:

1. Brown addressed the issue of gun control head-on:

Diamond "Lavish" Reynolds, the woman who live-streamed the aftermath of a police shooting that left her boyfriend dead, is demanding justice.

Reynolds delivered an emotional soliloquy to the activists and reporters who had gathered in front of the Minnesota governor's mansion in St. Paul on Thursday.

For more than four hours Thursday, FBI Director James Comey answered questions from the U.S. House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.

Comey appeared just two days after he announced that while Hillary Clinton was "extremely careless" in handling classified information while she was secretary of state, she should not face charges.

After seven years, the British have released the findings of inquiry into the Iraq War.

NPR's Lauren Frayer says that the 6,000-page report, the result of an investigation led by retired civil servant John Chilcot, found that Britain rushed to war before all peaceful means were exhausted. Lauren filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Flanked by his secretary of defense and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, President Obama announced that he was once again slowing the withdrawal of U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

By the time President Obama leaves office, 8,400 American troops will remain in the country. Obama said this was "the right thing to do."

"It is in our national security interest ... that we give our Afghan partners the very best opportunity to succeed," Obama said.

The long-running drama over Hillary Clinton's use of a personal email server during her time as secretary of state came to some resolution today as FBI Director James Comey announced that while Clinton was "extremely careless" in handling classified information, she should not face charges.

Take a look at this:

Now take a look at what was inside:

That's what the Miami-Dade Police Department found in the home of Luis Hernandez-Gonzalez, a Miami man who owns a store that sells equipment for indoor gardening.

Police are still counting the money but they know it's about $20 million, making it the largest cash seizure in Miami-Dade Police Department history.

Authorities in Florida have released hundreds of pages of documents related to the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando that left 49 victims dead.

The records reveal some of the deliberations of public officials after the shootings, and they also provide a disturbing window into how that night unfolded.

In a unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court threw out the corruption conviction of former Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell.

"There is no doubt that this case is distasteful; it may be worse than that," Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court. "But our concern is not with tawdry tales of Ferraris, Rolexes, and ball gowns. It is instead with the broader legal implications of the Government's boundless interpretation of the federal bribery statute."

Pages