Eyder Peralta

President Obama has ordered a full review of the process the United States uses to try to recover Americans taken hostage overseas.

In a recent letter to a lawmaker, Christine Wormuth, under secretary of defense for policy, said Obama ordered the review as a "result of the increased frequency of hostage-taking of Americans overseas, and the recognition of the dynamic threat posed by specific terrorist groups."

(This post was last updated at 5:15 p.m. ET.)

Two assailants, armed with a gun, knives and axes, launched an attack on worshippers at a Jerusalem Synagogue on Tuesday. It left five dead and at least six others wounded.

The U.S. State Department said three of the four killed were dual American and Israeli citizens. A policeman injured in the attack died late Tuesday, Haaretz reported.

The Colombian government has called off talks with Marxist rebels over the capture of a Colombian Army general.

Reporting for our Newscast unit, John Otis says the talks were designed to bring an end to 50 years of fighting between the Colombian government and Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC.

John sent this report:

"General Ruben Dario Alzate was detained by FARC rebels while traveling by riverboat in a remote jungle region. It marks the first time that the guerrillas have taken an army general captive.

Agents from the Drug Enforcement Agency conducted surprise inspections of the staff of at least three National Football League teams on Sunday.

CNN reports:

"The DEA questioned the medical and training staffs of the San Francisco 49ers following the team's 16-10 victory at the New York Giants, agency spokesman Rusty Payne told CNN.

Dr. Martin Salia, an Ebola patient who was flown to a Nebraska hospital for treatment, has died, hospital spokeswoman Jenny Nowatzke says.

Salia was working as a general surgeon at a hospital in Sierra Leone. Last Monday, despite the fact that he was not working with Ebola patients, he was diagnosed with the virus.

While addressing participants of a Vatican conference on traditional marriage, Pope Francis confirmed that he would visit the United States in the fall of next year.

ABC News reports:

American and Iranian negotiators are gathering in Vienna this week for what's expected to be a final push toward a deal over Iran's nuclear program.

The stakes are huge for both countries, and the deal could reshape the Middle East and pave the way for a new relationship between two bitter rivals.

But if you look at the headlines this morning, it'll give you an idea of just how tenuous a deal may be:

The Supreme Court will again take up a central question about President Obama's signature law — the Affordable Care Act.

On Friday, the court decided to hear a case challenging the legality of some of the subsidies provided by the federal government.

Ukraine says Russia has sent 32 tanks and 16 howitzer artillery systems across its border, threatening an already fragile ceasefire that was agreed to back in September.

Reuters reports:

The October jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed that the economy continued to add jobs at a healthy clip.

Here are the two big numbers:

The economy added 214,000 jobs; less than the 248,000 produced in September, but just about the 200,000 needed to keep pushing down the unemployment rate.

The Army is dropping the use of the term "negro" in an official document that listed it as an acceptable way to refer to African Americans.

CNN first pointed out the document on Thursday and just hours later the Army responded by revising the document.

The Associated Press reports:

Japan is one step closer to restarting its nuclear power operations, as regional authorities approved the restart of a nuclear reactor in the city of Satsuma Sendai in the Kagoshima Prefecture.

Remember, Japan shut down all of its nuclear reactors after a triple meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in 2011, which was triggered by a massive earthquake and tsunami.

Citing "people briefed on the correspondence," The Wall Street Journal is reporting that President Obama wrote a letter to Iran's supreme religious leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei this past October.

The letter, according to the newspaper, was about the U.S.-led fight against the so-called Islamic State.

The Journal reports:

Typhoon Nuri has already had a remarkable run on this Earth.

The Capital Weather Gang explains that for 24 hours over the weekend, Nuri was a category 5 monster storm with maximum sustained winds of 180 mph, tying with Typhoon Vongfong as the strongest cyclone of the season.

But Nuri may actually make a name for itself after it loses its tropical characteristics when it moves north into the Bering Sea.

Following three years of a tuition freeze, the University of California system is considering a major hike.

The Associated Press reports that UC President Janet Napolitano will present to the system's governing board a plan that calls for a tuition increase of as much as 5 percent each year for the next five years.

The Los Angeles Times reports:

Updated: 12:22 a.m. ET Friday:

Because of a lack of evidence, prosecutors in New Zealand have dropped a murder-for-hire charge against AC/DC drummer Phil Rudd. The Associated Press reports the 60-year-old Rudd had been charged Thursday with trying to arrange two killings. He's still facing charges of threatening to kill, possession of methamphetamine and possession of marijuana.

Original Post:

Authorities in New Zealand have charged Phil Rudd, the drummer for the legendary hard rock band AC/DC, with trying to have two men killed.

The new secretary general of NATO and Pakistan's Army chief were in Kabul on Thursday to meet with newly-sworn-in President Ashraf Ghani.

As NPR's Sean Carberry reports the visits mark a continued honeymoon between the international community and Afghanistan's new government. Sean sent this report to our Newscast unit:

"Neither visit resulted in any new policies or initiatives. Rather, they appeared to be about marking a new chapter in Afghanistan's relations with NATO and Pakistan.

Teresa Romero Ramos, the Spanish nursing assistant who was diagnosed with Ebola, is now cured and has left a hospital in Madrid.

Just before her departure, her husband, Javier Limón, reportedly said Romero would sue Madrid's government for intimating that she had lied and for "executing" her dog Excálibur, while she was being treated for the deadly virus.

After a landslide victory on Tuesday, Saira Blair, an 18-year-old fiscal conservative, will become West Virginia's youngest lawmaker.

Blair earned 63 percent of the vote, winning a seat on the West Virginia House of Delegates.

In a statement on her campaign's Facebook page, Blair said her election sent a message that the road to "prosperity and success is rooted in conservative values and principles."

The big headline from last night's midterm elections is that Republicans walloped the Democrats, cashing in on enormous discontent about the state of the country to pick up seven Senate seats and wrest control of the chamber.

That, of course, sets up divided government for the next two years: a Democratic president and a GOP-controlled legislature.

Here are six tidbits that tell the story:

You thought that "I'm a Voter" app at the top of your Facebook newsfeed was just some cute flair, right?

Well, it actually makes a difference. No, really. Some serious scientists collaborated with Facebook in 2010 and found that the app added 340,000 additional voters that election cycle.

Here's how The New Republic explained the methodology:

Workers at a salvage yard in Genoa, Italy, found the remains of the last victim still missing after the Costa Concordia capsized in January of 2012.

The BBC reports the workers handed the remains over to authorities, who believe the remains belong to Russel Robello, a waiter who was working on the ship the day it ran aground.

CNN reports:

China says it has developed a laser capable of destroying a small drone flying at a low altitude.

The official state news agency Xinhua reports:

Voters across the country are headed to polls this morning. Thirty-six U.S. Senate seats and 36 governor's chairs are in play.

Our friends at It's All Politics have a ton of coverage. We'll leave you with five headlines from across the web that give you a broad overview of what to expect:

Mexican Federal Police captured the former mayor of Iguala, José Luis Abarca, and his wife, María de los Ángeles Pineda, near Mexico City this morning, the spokesman for the Federal Police said in a tweet.

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