Jeanne Timmons

Volunteer / Contributor
Word of Mouth
2:12 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Dinosaur Day Unearths The Latest In Paleontology

Cliff the Triceratops wants YOU to learn about dinosaurs!
Credit via the Museum of Science website

Love dinosaurs?  Want to learn more about the latest in paleontology?

This Saturday, the Museum of Science, Boston offers dinosaur enthusiasts the rare opportunity to hear first-hand from paleontologists from around the U.S. about their research and theories.  Dinosaur Day begins at 10 am, with presentations and panel discussions throughout the afternoon. The not yet annual event, will focus on the Ceratopsidae family—frilled and horned dinosaurs—much like “Cliff”, the 65-million-year-old Triceratops fossil currently on-loan at the Museum.

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NH News
3:36 pm
Tue February 14, 2012

Mapping the Legal Status of Same Sex Unions

The Geography of Love Same-Sex Marriage & Relationship Recognition in America
Book Cover Courtesy Peter Nicolas & Mike Strong

With the constant legal and legislative changes affecting same-sex couples across the country, it might seem an impossible feat to keep track.

In The Geography of Love: Same-Sex Marriage & Relationship Recognition in America (The Story in Maps), authors Mike Strong and Peter Nicolas do just that. They offer a concise view of the political landscape regarding gay marriage.  And they do so in a unique way: offering visual representations of votes and legal rights.

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Arts & Culture
1:00 pm
Tue January 3, 2012

Museum Brings Pompeii To Life

Body cast of a young woman from A Day in Pompeii on exhibit now through February 12, 2012, at the Museum of Science, Boston.
© William Starling, Photographer.

In August 79 AD, disaster struck among the cities surrounding Mt. Vesuvius in Italy.  It is believed that the Roman citizens living in that area did not know that the mountain looming above their homes was a volcano, nor did they know that the earthquakes leading up to that day were an indication that an eruption would follow.

When it erupted that day, Mt. Vesuvius eventually sealed everything and everyone in its path beneath 70 feet of lava.

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