Jeff Brady

Jeff Brady is a National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia, where he covers the mid-Atlantic region and energy issues. Brady helped establish NPR's environment and energy collaborative which brings together NPR and Member station reporters from across the country to cover the big stories involving the natural world.

Brady approaches energy stories from the consumer side of the light switch and the gas pump in an effort to demystify an industry that can seem complicated and opaque. Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has visited a solar power plant in the Nevada desert that lights casinos after the sun goes down. In 2017 his reporting showed a history of racism and sexism that have made it difficult for the oil business to diversify its workforce.

In 2011 Brady led NPR's coverage of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal at Penn State—from the night legendary football coach Joe Paterno was fired to the trial where Sandusky was found guilty.

In 2005, Brady was among the NPR reporters who covered the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His reporting on flooded cars left behind after the storm exposed efforts to stall the implementation of a national car titling system. Today, the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System is operational and the Department of Justice estimates it could save car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He has also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter, and in commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University). In 2018 SOU honored Brady with its annual "Distinguished Alumni" award.

Even Rick Perry changes his mind.

At his confirmation hearing as President-elect Donald Trump's pick for Secretary of Energy, the former Texas governor said he no longer wants to do away with the department he once said should be eliminated.

Or, at least, that was something he tried to say.

In 2011, during one of his presidential campaign debates, Perry could only remember the names of two of the three agencies he wanted get rid of. The third agency is the very one he was chosen by Trump to head.

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election.

Pennsylvania surprised a lot of people in November when voters abandoned a long history of electing Democrats for president and chose Republican Donald Trump.

The U.S. could become a net exporter of energy in coming years, according to the federal government's Annual Energy Outlook 2017. This continues a trend the Energy Information Administration has highlighted before in its annual report.

Many transgender people in the U.S. are rushing to change their designated gender on government documents before President-elect Donald Trump takes office. They worry the next administration may take that ability away.

There's no indication so far that this is a priority for Trump. Mara Keisling with the National Center for Transgender Equality says Trump's positions on trans issues are not clear. But she's concerned about people he's nominated for key positions in his administration.

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Pennsylvania has voted reliably for Democrats for nearly three decades until this election. NPR's Jeff Brady spoke with Trump supporters celebrating at a restaurant in Morgantown, a small town in the eastern part of the state.

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Police used pepper spray and what they called nonlethal ammunition to remove Dakota Access Pipeline protesters from federal land Wednesday. Demonstrators say they were trying to occupy land just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation where construction of the controversial pipeline is scheduled.

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Amy Goodman — the host of the left-leaning Democracy Now news program — will not face criminal charges for her coverage of an oil pipeline protest in North Dakota last month. At least not for now; prosecutors say they may still bring charges later.

On Sept. 3, Goodman and her crew captured images of security teams with dogs trying to keep protesters from entering a pipeline construction site. She wanted to know whether security members were "telling the dogs to bite the protesters?"

Expressing political beliefs with a yard sign is common. But business owners can hurt their bottom lines by advertising an opinion.

Political scientists and marketing experts generally advise against doing that, as we first reported during the 2012 election.

Despite the advice, some business owners are willing to risk a financial hit, depending on whether their customers agree with them.

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Let's hear now about a proposed solar power project in Nevada, which would be so big it will generate more electricity each year than the Hoover Dam. NPR's Jeff Brady reports this solar power plant also could generate electricity after the sun goes down.

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We have a photo this morning. Police released a photo of a person they want to find in connection with last weekend's attack on New York City. NPR's Jeff Brady is in New York. He's covering the story. Jeff, good morning.

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The debate over the construction of an oil pipeline near a Native American reservation in North Dakota is now a national issue.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: (Singing in Native American language).

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In North Dakota, work has stopped on one section of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline. Still, over the weekend protesters continued to stream into camps set up near the construction site.

One protest camp is about an hour's drive south of Bismarck. A prairie there is covered with tepees, tents and RVs. Flags from tribes around the country line the dirt road into the camp.

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Gas prices are cheaper these days, which has led to many more Americans taking a lot more road trips this summer. In fact, the U.S. is on the verge of breaking a record set nine years ago for consumption of gas. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

Amtrak has started settling lawsuits filed in the wake of a deadly derailment in Philadelphia in May 2015, but the details of those agreements are being kept secret.

Eight people were killed and more than 200 others were injured when Amtrak Train 188 derailed after leaving the main Philadelphia station headed for New York.

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Inside the arena of the Democratic National Convention last night, the party pulled out all the stops to unite delegates behind Hillary Clinton. Outside of the arena, NPR's Jeff Brady reports, there were plenty of pro-Bernie Sanders protesters and police.

The Democratic National Convention begins Monday in Philadelphia. As the party finishes last-minute preparations, protesters also are getting ready.

The city has approved 28 permits for rallies and marches. Name a cause and you can bet a protest for it is planned. Applicants range from an anti-gay church to the group "Black Men for Bernie."

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The U.S. Department of Energy is considering the future of a public asset worth tens of billions of dollars: the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

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When tragedy hits a community, the instinct for many people is to find a way to help those who were hurt the most. NPR's Jeff Brady saw evidence of that this week at Orlando's LGBT Center.

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And my co-host Ari Shapiro is in Orlando. He visited a family there whose daughter died in the attack. She had just graduated high school. And she went to the Pulse Nightclub that night to dance and celebrate. We will hear from that family in just a moment.

On The Ground In Orlando

Jun 12, 2016

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Now we want to turn to NPR's Jeff Brady, who's a few blocks away from the shooting scene in Orlando, and he's with us now. Jeff, thank you so much for joining us once again.

JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Yes, I'm here.

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Much of the blame for an Amtrak train derailment in Philadelphia last year appears to rest with a single engineer. That's the conclusion of a federal investigation into the accident which killed eight people and injured dozens. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

One issue at the center of North Carolina's so-called bathroom bill controversy is safety, but who's at risk? Depends on whom you ask.

Supporters of House Bill 2 tend to focus on people born male who later transition to female. The HB2 supporters say that without the new law, sexual predators could just say they're a transgender person with the right to use a women's bathroom and easily gain access to potential victims.

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