Josh Rogers

Senior Political Reporter and Editor

Josh has worked at NHPR since 2000 and serves as NHPR’s State House reporter. Before joining the staff, he lived in New York, where he worked for a number of different magazines.

Josh’s award winning reporting can be heard locally but also regularly airs on national broadcasts of NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Josh is also a frequent analyst on political talk shows in the state. He grew up in Concord, and holds a Bachelor of Arts in American Studies from Reed College.

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Campaigning in Hampton, Hillary Clinton criticized republicans for not supporting the Export-Import Bank, which Clinton says has helped produce hundreds of millions of dollars of exports from N.H. businesses.

Clinton met with local businesspeople at the Smuttynose Brewery.

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All week long, we've has been looking at how disparities in early childhood can shape a child’s chances for later in life.

Issues surrounding what some call the opportunity gap and others call inequality of opportunity, are common concerns of politicians in both parties these days, starting at the very top.

Kate Harper for NHPR

Republican Jeb Bush is back in New Hampshire.

The likely presidential candidate told an audience in Bedford that the GOP field has a lot of talkers but he’s delivered results.

At the Bedford home of BAE Systems executive and former Republican Congressional candidate Rich Ashooh, Bush stressed his efforts to bring greater choice and accountability to Florida’s education system as that state’s governor, telling voters it was emblematic of his approach to leadership.

Republican Chris Christie says the U.S. needs to boost military spending and not back off on intelligence and surveillance programs. 

Speaking in Portsmouth’s Prescott Park, Chris Christie said the army needs more soldiers, the navy more ships, the air force more planes --and the government more intelligence.

Christie called for an extension to the Patriot act, and said concerns over data collection and privacy are overblown.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

It’s been a tough few days for first district congressman Frank Guinta. First, the news that the Federal Elections Commission found Guinta violated campaign finance laws by accepting $355,000 money from his parents in 2010,  then Joe McQuaid, publisher of The Union Leader ran a six word editorial: "Frank Guinta is a damned liar." Shortly after, U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte said Guinta owes voters a full accounting.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

N.H.’s top GOP officeholder says Congressman Frank Guinta owes voters a full accounting in the wake of Federal Election Commission settlement that found Guinta accepted $355,000 in illegal campaign donations from his parents in 2009 and 2010. 

US Senator Kelly Ayotte helped Guinta's campaign committee raise money last fall.  That same committee must now refund the $355,000 Guinta accepted from his parents.

NHPR Staff

The state’s highest court has upheld a ruling that struck down a 2012 law linking registering to vote with state motor vehicle laws.

In a unanimous ruling the court called the voter form language  “confusing and inaccurate” and that it unreasonably burdens the fundamental right to vote.”

Out-of-state college students challenged the law, which added language to the form noting that drivers need to register vehicles and apply for a state driver’s license within 60 days of becoming a resident.

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

The US Supreme Court last year struck down a 35-foot buffer zone law in Massachusetts, and NH’s 25-foot buffer law remains under challenge in US District Court.

This issue is also contentious at the state house.  For opponents of the buffer zones. Like Republican Senator Sharon Carson of Londonderry, it is about free speech and individual liberty.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Congressman Frank Guinta took $355,000 in illegal donations from his parents in 2009 and 2010, and that’s the conclusion of and FEC investigation.  Guinta, who had long denied he’s taken money from his parents, has agreed to pay that money back, plus a $15,000 fine. NHPR's Josh Rogers talks with All Things Considered host Peter Biello.

Associated Press

Campaigning in Londonderry, GOP presidential candidate Rand Paul went after fellow republican Jeb Bush on privacy issues, and said he will lead the filibuster effort against any extension of the Patriot Act.

The Kentucky Senator Paul ask voters to be wary of would-be presidents who, as he put it, don’t support  'the entire bill of rights.'

On The Political Front is our weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire has a reputation as a place where liberties are prized yet it’s the only New England state where possessing even a small amount of marijuana remains a crime that can land people in jail. A bill before the state’s GOP-controlled legislature would change that, but first it needs to win the backing of Governor Hassan.

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Chris Christie’s first stop was the Farnum Center drug and alcohol treatment facility in Manchester. He stressed addition can affect anyone, and that recovery is possible.

"I just believe everybody deserves a second chance, that everybody deserves to understand that this is treatable."

Brady Carlson / NHPR

On The Political Front is our weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. This week, a look at the New Hampshire primary and the state budget.

So, it’s official: the Democratic presidential primary will include more than just Hillary Clinton. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders is in the race, and says he’s in it to win.

josh rogers/nhpr

Hillary Clinton came to Keene to listen to workers at Whitney Brothers children’s furniture plant. But she also offered up a tough assessment of the country’s  small business economy.

“We have stalled out. I was very surprised to see that when I began to dig into it.”

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

On The Political Front is our weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. This week, a look back to the First in the Nation Republican Leadership Summit held in Nashua over the weekend.

So Josh, a big weekend for Republicans and Hillary Clinton arrives in New Hampshire this afternoon. 2016 is upon is.

josh rogers/nhpr

If Chris Christie had his way, Social Security would morph from a program that pays benefits to all workers who pay in, to one that means tests beneficiaries. 

Future seniors who earn $80,000 in retirement income would see their social security checks shrink.

Retirees earning more than $200,000 would get no check at all.

"Do we really believe that the wealthiest Americans need to take from younger, hard-working Americans to receive what for most of them, is a modest monthly social security check? I say no."

hillaryclinton.com

On The Political Front is our weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. This week, a look at the latest in the 2016 presidential race and the New Hampshire primary.

Hillary Clinton made it official yesterday – she’s running for president. There’s no shortage of coverage of that on our air – and everywhere else this morning. But I want to talk to you about what it all means for New Hampshire.

When Rand Paul took the podium at Milford Town Hall, he was quick to indicate his vision of what granite state voters want.

“I come to N.H. to announce that I will fight for your right to be left alone.”

Paul railed against government surveillance of phone records and said he’d keep the federal government out of states when it comes to education. He also cited a balanced budget amendment and term limits for member of congress as a way to “defeat the Washington machine.”

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Senate President Chuck Morse has repeatedly said he won’t include money derived from unapproved forms of gambling in the senate budget proposal. He reiterated that point as he pitched the casinos -- which could include a total of 5000 slot machines and 240 table games -- to the house ways and means committee.

"You know we are going to fund the needs of the people of the state of N.H. in the state budget, but I can assure you the wants are much greater."

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

On The Political Front is our weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. This week, a look at the state budget, as Senate lawmakers begin work on crafting their own version of a two-year plan.

The New Hampshire House did what some thought it wouldn’t – or couldn’t –  pass a budget. The process  now begins anew in the state Senate.

josh rogers/nhpr

Republican George Pataki returned to N.H. Thursday.

The former New York Governor stumped in the North Country and announced a steering committee for what he describes as a likely presidential bid.

Pataki also took aim at Indiana’s controversial religious freedom law.

The law seeks to bar government actions that "substantially burden a person's exercise of religion,” and allows businesses to claim a right to free exercise of religion.

Civil rights groups say this opens the door to discrimination against gays and lesbians.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire house has passed an $11.2 billion state budget.

The proposal includes no tax and fee increases and lifts state spending by about $400 million, some $300 million dollars less than the plan proposed by Governor Maggie Hassan.

“This was an effort to look under every cushion of the sofa to look for loose change.”

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

On the Political Front, NHPR's Josh Rogers speaks with Morning Edition host Rick Ganley about the state budget going before the House this week.

The state budget, the version crafted by House budget writers, heads for a floor vote this week. House Speaker Shawn Jasper has indicated he’s ready to lock lawmakers in to get the job done. Is it going to come to that?

josh rogers/nhpr

Ohio Governor John Kasich told an audience at St. Anselm College that true leadership requires listening to opposing views -- and ignoring polls. 

Kasich says that’s the approach he’s taken during his two terms leading Ohio.

“Leaders don’t take polls, ladies and gentlemen. You know I try to tell my colleagues in the legislature. Do your job, if you worry about election or reelection you won’t be doing your job.”

Kasich served in congress from 1982-2001, and later worked as a Fox News host.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

On The Political Front is our weekly conversation with NHPR's Senior Political Reporter Josh Rogers. This week, a look at the politics behind a push for an increase to the gas tax from the head of the House Finance Committee. 

The Finance Committee in the New Hampshire House hopes to finish its work on the House’s budget this week. Some of their decisions have been controversial, and there’s even been talk that mustering the votes to pass a budget in the House may be tough.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The business profits tax (BPT) stands at 8.5%; the business enterprise tax (BET) at .75%.

Under these bills, those would drop every year  until 2019, when the BPT would be 7.9% and the BET  .675%.

Senate majority leader Jeb Bradley told colleagues the cuts are an overdue recognition that N.H. isn’t as business friendly as it needs to be.

“To ignore the fact that we have an uncompetitive corporate tax rate is nothing worse than the most myopic short sightedness that we could have.”

Democrats, like David Watters, countered that cuts are ill-conceived.

josh rogers/nhpr

Ted Cruz says history shows the GOP has been ill-served by presidential candidates based on their perceived electability.

Cruz favors abolishing the IRS in favor of a flat tax, and repeatedly said he plays to repeal every word fo so-called Obamacare, says the way to to avoid what he called the mushy middle,  is draw a line in the sand and make the race a clear choice. If that happens, Cruz says, the right sort of conservative would win broad support.

NHPR / Josh Rogers

It’s Monday morning. NHPR’s Josh Rogers joins Morning Edition to discuss developments on NH’s political front.

Lots of political activity over the weekend Jeb Bush, Scott Walker and Ted Cruz all paying their respects to local Republicans. House budget writers busy. Let’s start with presidential politics.

josh rogers/nhpr

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker arrived in New Hampshire preaching small government and working to rebut claims he’s changed his stances on key issues.

His surging popularity among Republicans was on full display in Concord.

Unions protested outside his speech; Republicans inside cheered as Walker called for tax cuts and “eradicating” terrorism.

“We need a commander-in-chief who stands up and once and for all says our biggest problem is radical Islamic terrorism and we are going to do whatever it takes to weed it out all over the world.”

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