Kathy Lohr

Whether covering the manhunt and eventual capture of Eric Robert Rudolph in the mountains of North Carolina, the remnants of the Oklahoma City federal building with its twisted metal frame and shattered glass, flood-ravaged Midwestern communities, or the terrorist bombings across the country, including the blast that exploded in Centennial Olympic Park in downtown Atlanta, correspondent Kathy Lohr has been at the heart of stories all across the nation.

Lohr was NPR's first reporter based in the Midwest. She opened NPR's St. Louis office in 1990 and the Atlanta bureau in 1996. Lohr covers the abortion issue on an ongoing basis for NPR, including political and legal aspects. She has often been sent into disasters as they are happening, to provide listeners with the intimate details about how these incidents affect people and their lives.

Lohr filed her first report for NPR while working for member station KCUR in Kansas City, Missouri. She graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia, and began her journalism career in commercial television and radio as a reporter/anchor. Lohr also became involved in video production for national corporations and taught courses in television reporting and radio production at universities in Kansas and Missouri. She has filed reports for the NPR documentary program Horizons, the BBC, the CBC, Marketplace, and she was published in the Saturday Evening Post.

Lohr won the prestigious Missouri Medal of Honor for Excellence in Journalism in 2002. She received a fellowship from Vanderbilt University for work on the issue of domestic violence. Lohr has filed reports from 27 states and the District of Columbia. She has received other national awards for her coverage of the 1996 Summer Olympic Games, the Oklahoma City bombing, the Midwestern floods of 1993, and for her reporting on ice storms in the Mississippi Delta. She has also received numerous awards for radio pieces on the local level prior to joining NPR's national team. Lohr was born and raised in Omaha, Nebraska. She now lives in her adopted hometown of Atlanta, covering stories across the southeastern part of the country.

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Around the Nation
5:06 am
Tue July 16, 2013

New Band Director Says Florida A&M Must March Forward

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 6:21 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Let's go now to a university that's rebuilding its marching band. Florida A&M University recently lifted its suspension of the group known as the Marching 100. The band had been suspended since 2011 when a hazing that went too far ended in the death of one of the band's drum majors, Robert Champion. Champion's parents aren't happy about the university moving forward so quickly.

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Crime In The City
3:00 am
Mon July 15, 2013

G-Man Fights Crime, And A Medical Disorder, In Kansas City

Author Joel Goldman has found there's plenty of true crime to write about in the Kansas City metro area.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 5:10 am

Split by the Missouri-Kansas state line, the Kansas City metro area has been home to political bosses, jazz clubs, barbecue joints and tough characters, all of which find their way into author Joel Goldman crime thrillers.

Nine years ago, when Goldman was working as an attorney, he was diagnosed with a movement disorder that makes him shake and stutter at times. So he quit his practice and eventually gave his medical condition to one of his main characters, Kansas City FBI agent Jack Davis.

'Brought To His Knees' In A Hardscrabble Neighborhood

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Law
6:42 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

Chef Paula Deen Under Fire After Admitting To Racial Slurs

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 5:27 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The chef and TV personality Paula Deen is famous for her butter-filled embrace of old-fashioned Southern cooking. Well, now she's facing widespread criticism for allegedly using racial slurs. A former employee filed a race and sex discrimination lawsuit against Deen and her brother. As NPR's Kathy Lohr reports, the lawsuit is bringing out some surprising admissions.

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Religion
5:23 am
Tue June 11, 2013

Churches Reconsider Sponsoring Boy Scout Troops

Some churches have said they will end their affiliation with the Boy Scouts after its decision to allow openly gay members to join. Others, including Southern Baptists, are considering their next move. Another group plans to hold a meeting in Louisville later this month with parents who say they want a more Christian organization for their children.

Around the Nation
8:23 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Boy Scouts Vote To Allow Gay Members, But Not Leaders

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 6:01 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Boy Scouts ban on openly gay scouts is coming to an end. That's the result of a vote held today by the leadership of the Boys Scouts of America.

WAYNE PERRY: Our vision is to serve every kid. We want every kid to have a place where they belong, to learn and grow and feel protected.

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Around the Nation
4:44 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Boy Scouts Vote On Whether To Allow Openly Gay Members

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 8:23 pm

Members of the Boy Scouts of America will vote on Thursday on whether to allow gay members.

Around the Nation
8:26 am
Wed May 22, 2013

Boy Scouts To Decide Whether To Admit Gay Youth

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 9:29 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer.

This week, Boy Scouts of America officials will meet in Texas to consider changing the group's longstanding ban on gay members. The first round of voting starts tomorrow. A new membership policy would allow gay youth, but continue to ban adult leaders who are gay.

NPR's Kathy Lohr reports.

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Around the Nation
6:08 am
Wed May 8, 2013

S.C. Voters Confer Comeback Title To Mark Sanford

Originally published on Thu May 9, 2013 11:43 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Many a politician suffers a setback and recovers. Rarely does a politician endure a scandal and nationwide mockery on the scale of Mark Sanford and still recover.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Sanford did. South Carolina's former governor defeated Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch in a special election for Congress.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

REPRESENTATIVE-ELECT MARK SANFORD: Some guy came up to me the other day. He said: You look a lot like Lazarus.

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NPR Story
10:56 pm
Tue May 7, 2013

Mark Sanford Wins House Race

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In South Carolina tonight, a political comeback. Republican Mark Sanford, who was once mired in scandal as the state's governor, has won a congressional seat in a special election. He has defeated Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch in a race that attracted national attention. Sanford just delivered his victory speech.

MARK SANFORD: I have a question for you all. How many of you want to change Washington, D.C.?

(APPLAUSE)

SANFORD: I had a suspicion that that may be the case and...

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It's All Politics
2:37 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Democrats Have High Hopes Of Defeating Sanford In S.C.

Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch looks over at former Republican Gov. Mark Sanford during a debate Monday in Charleston, S.C., in the 1st Congressional District race.
Randall Hill Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 8:28 pm

Democrats have their best chance in more than three decades to win a South Carolina congressional seat in a special election Tuesday.

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Law
4:41 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Miss. Law Could Force Women's Clinic To Close

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 12:14 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The state of Mississippi has one clinic where abortions are performed and its future is in doubt. A new law could force the clinic to close. Meanwhile, the governor says he wants Mississippi to become the first abortion-free state in the nation. But NPR's Kathy Lohr reports that a recent ruling from a federal judge is allowing the clinic to say open - for now.

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Politics
5:06 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Sanford, Colbert Busch Clash In Sole Debate Before Special Election

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 3:27 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

There's a high profile congressional race going on in South Carolina and last night the two candidates met in their first - and only - debate. For the Republican, former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford. This is an attempted political comeback, but it's being hindered by new allegations by his ex-wife that reminds some voters of how Sanford left office in the first place.

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Around the Nation
5:46 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

50 Years Later, King's Birmingham 'Letter' Still Resonates

Martin Luther King Jr., with the Rev. Ralph Abernathy (center) and the Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, defied an injunction against protesting on Good Friday in 1963. They were arrested and held in solitary confinement in the Birmingham jail where King wrote his famous "Letter From Birmingham Jail."
Courtesy of Birmingham Public Library Archives

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 1:12 am

It's been five decades since Martin Luther King Jr., began writing his famous "Letter From Birmingham Jail," a response to eight white Alabama clergymen who criticized King and worried the civil rights campaign would cause violence. They called King an "extremist" and told blacks they should be patient.

But the time for waiting was over. Birmingham was the perfect place to take a stand.

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Education
6:38 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Accused Cheaters In Atlanta Scandal Surrender

Originally published on Wed April 3, 2013 8:19 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Teachers and administrators in Atlanta surrendered to authorities yesterday at the Fulton County jail. The group were among 35 Atlanta school board employees charged in a racketeering indictment, accused of cheating in district schools. Prosecutors say the teachers and administrators were plotting to help schools academic goals. NPR's Kathy Lohr reports.

KATHY LOHR, BYLINE: Around 7:30 in the evening, former superintendent of the Atlanta schools, Beverly Hall, turned herself into the jail, escorted by attorneys.

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Law
4:56 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

North Dakota Passes Nation's Toughest Abortion Laws

Originally published on Wed March 27, 2013 5:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

North Dakota now has the toughest abortion laws in the nation. That's after the state's governor, Jack Dalrymple, signed three bills into law today. One makes it a crime to perform abortions if a fetal heartbeat is detected.

As NPR's Kathy Lohr reports, that would effectively ban nearly all abortions in the state and sets up a likely court challenge.

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