Korva Coleman

Korva Coleman is a newscaster for NPR.

In this role, she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts airing during NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. Occasionally she serves as a substitute host for Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Before joining NPR in 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C.

Early in her career, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

Coleman's work has been recognized by the Arizona Associated Press Awards for best radio newscast, editorial, and short feature. In 1983, she was nominated for Outstanding Young Woman of America.

Coleman earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Howard University. She studied law at Georgetown University Law Center.

Reports from the west African nation, Mali, say this week's counter-coup attempt failed against the junta that toppled Mali's democratically elected president.

Chen Guangchen, the blind Chinese legal activist who escaped home custody, is said to be hiding inside the U.S. Embassy in Beijing. The U.S.-based Christian human rights group, CHINAaid, made the claim, saying they got the information "from a source close to the Chen Guangchen situation."

Hockey fans in the nation's capital are savoring an underdog victory: last night, the Washington Capitals knocked the Boston Bruins, last year's Stanley Cup champions, out of the playoffs. Nearly three minutes into overtime, Caps right winger Joel Ward fired a puck past Bruins goalie Tim Thomas, ending Boston's hopes for a repeat of the 2011 victory. The final score: 2-1.

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano pledged on Wednesday the investigation into Secret Service agents who allegedly hired prostitutes this month in Cartagena, Colombia, "will be complete and thorough and we will leave no stone unturned."

Easy, isn't it? Get a note from the TSA officer who screens you at the airport so you know which lane to pick for your security check. Then stroll through with your suitcase jammed with kilos of cocaine. Your screener won't utter a peep, even if it's marijuana or methamphetamines instead. In exchange, pay your screener hundreds of dollars in a bribe.

It's not J.J. Abrams' souped up special effects film, 'Armageddon' - there's a real effort afoot to launch rockets into space to dock with asteroids. A new company is trying to do just that, and it's won the backing of several technology leaders.

If it's Tuesday, somebody somewhere is voting. Here are some of the headlines we're watching:

Today's Primaries: Gingrich's Swan Song Or Reason To Remain?

It's Zip It Day On Google.

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