Krishnadev Calamur

Thin Mints, Do-si-dos and Samoas just became easier to buy: Girl Scouts will now be able to use Digital Cookies to sell the treats online.

"Girls have been telling us that they want to go into this space," said Sarah Angel-Johnson, chief digital cookie executive for the Girl Scouts of the USA. "Online is where entrepreneurship is going."

Her comments were reported by The Associated Press.

Jian Ghomeshi, a former radio host in Canada, was arrested Wednesday and charged with four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking.

The charges carry sentences ranging from 10 years to life in prison.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency unveiled new rules today to reduce emission levels for smog-causing ozone, which is linked to asthma and other health problems.

The draft measure calls for lowering the threshold for ozone from 75 parts per billion to between 65 ppb and 70 ppb. The agency said it would take comments on an ozone level as low as 60 ppb.

American figure skaters Vivian and Ronald Joseph placed fourth in the 1964 Winter Games in Innsbruck, Austria. But a couple of years later, the International Olympic Committee determined that the West German silver medalists, Marika Kilius and Hans-Jurgen Baumler, had signed a professional contract before the games and stripped them of their medals (the IOC took such things seriously in those days).

Updated, 6 p.m. ET

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon rejected a call today to appoint a special prosecutor in the Michael Brown case, the St. Louis Post Dispatch reported.

That's a bad decision, says Mae Quinn. A law professor at the city's Washington University, Quinn told the Post Dispatch that she felt officer Darren Wilson received preferential treatment:

We've already touched on Officer Darren Wilson's testimony and that of the dozens of people who testified as witnesses in front of the grand jury in the shooting death of Michael Brown.

Now let's look at some of the physical evidence:

Update at 9:00 a.m.

Darren Wilson, the police officer who shot and killed Michael Brown, told a grand jury in September that the 18-year-old hit him in the face with a fist following an exchange between them on Aug. 9 in Ferguson, Mo.

The grand jury on Monday declined to charge Wilson, who is white, in the killing of Brown, who was black.

Updated at 5:00 p.m.

Attorneys for the family of Michael Brown, the 18-year-old who was shot and killed by Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson, said they had expected Monday's outcome in which a grand jury declined to charge the officer in the fatal shooting.

"We could see what the outcome was going to be, and that is what occurred last night," attorney Benjamin Crump said at a news conference in St. Louis Tuesday.

He said the fact that Wilson was not indicted shows the system is broken.

Israel's Cabinet approved a draft law on Sunday that defines the country as "the nation-state of the Jewish people." The move has angered not only Israel's Arab citizens, but also some members of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's coalition government.

NPR's Emily Harris is reporting on the measure, which must still be approved by Israel's Parliament. Here's what she told our Newscast unit:

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

For more than six decades, the heart of a Beat literature classic had been thought lost, dropped overboard a houseboat. Turns out, the letter that helped inspire Jack Kerouac's On the Road has now reportedly resurfaced — not from the sea, but from an unopened envelope buried in a defunct publisher's office.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his Iranian counterpart, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, added another meeting today in Vienna in the push toward an agreement on Iran's nuclear program.

Iranian news reports had earlier said Zarif was returning to Tehran for further instructions. And Kerry had been scheduled to leave Vienna for Paris – something he could still do while talks continue — before adding the late Friday meeting.

The Texas State Board of Education has voted to approve the use of 89 history and social studies books across the state.

The 10-5 vote in the Republican-controlled panel was along party lines. The Texas Tribune has more:

Martial law in Thailand will remain in place "indefinitely," the country's justice minister told Reuters in an interview nearly six months after the military overthrew the government of Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra.

Former News of the World editor Andy Coulson, who was found guilty of conspiracy to hack personal voice mails, was released today after serving less than five months of his 18-month sentence.

British news reports say that as a condition of early release, Coulson, 46, will have to wear an electronic tag for the remainder of his sentence.

London Mayor Boris Johnson owes the IRS money — and he's not going to pay it.

Johnson, who was born in the U.S. and lived here until he was 5 years old, holds dual U.S.-U.K. citizenship.

At issue, he told NPR member station WAMU's Diane Rehm Show in an interview, was capital gains on the sale of his first residence, a sum that is not taxable in Britain.

Soccer's governing body said today it will further review the bidding process for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, reopening for scrutiny the mechanism by which Russia and Qatar were awarded the tournaments.

The executive in charge of quality for Takata Corp. apologized today for the defects in the air bags made by his company that have been linked to at least five deaths and dozens of injuries.

"We are deeply sorry about each of the reported instances in which a Takata air bag has not performed as designed and the driver or passenger had suffered personal injuries or death," Hiroshi Shimizu, senior vice president of quality for Takata, told the Senate Commerce Committee.

Spain's richest woman, the Duchess of Alba, has died at the age of 88 in Seville.

Maria del Rosario Cayetana Fitz-James Stuart had more titles than any other aristocrat in the world. Her parents gave her several names, but she preferred Cayetana.

The BBC adds:

Republicans in Congress are warning President Obama against acting alone on immigration, hours ahead of a planned announcement by the president that could provide temporary relief to some of the nearly 12 million immigrants in the country illegally.

Republicans say any unilateral action on immigration by the president would mean there is no chance of passing a comprehensive immigration overhaul in Congress.

Updated at 8:40 a.m.

Award-winning director Mike Nichols has died at the age of 83, ABC News announced in a statement.

"He was a true visionary, winning the highest honors in the arts for his work as a director, writer, producer and comic and was one of a tiny few to win the EGOT — an Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony in his lifetime," ABC News President James Goldston said in the statement.

Florida State University police shot and killed a gunman who had opened fire in the crowded university library around midnight. Three people were wounded.

Michael DeLeo, Tallahassee, Fla.'s chief of police, said the gunman appears to have acted alone.

"It will take not only hours but days to put all the pieces together," he said at a news conference this morning. "Obviously, everyone wants to know why, and that's the hard question that we're going to continue to investigate and try to find those answers for everybody."

Britain says it won't allow a controversial American dating coach to enter the country as his presence isn't "conducive to the public good."

[Fair warning: If you click on any of the links in this story, you will see offensive material.]

The American in question is 25-year-old Julien Blanc. His Twitter profile says he is the executive coach for Real Social Dynamics, a dating advice company. Blanc was scheduled to make public appearances in the U.K. in February 2015.

A human rights group is calling on Indonesia to scrap "virginity tests" given to female police recruits.

Soccer's governing body says it has lodged a criminal complaint against individuals in connection with the awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cups, days after clearing the winning bids of corruption.

"In particular there seem to be grounds for suspicion that, in isolated cases, international transfers of assets with connections to Switzerland took place, which merit examination by the criminal prosecution authorities," FIFA said in a statement.

Charles Manson has been in prison since 1969 and isn't eligible for parole until 2027, but he may be getting married — to a 26-year-old woman who visits him in prison and believes he is innocent.

The Associated Press obtained the marriage license for Manson, 80, and Afton Elaine Burton, who maintains websites advocating for his innocence in the Tate-LaBianca murders.

The parents of Peter Kassig, the American aid worker who was killed by the Islamic State militant group, said his life was evidence that "one person can make a difference."

In a brief statement Monday, Paula and Ed Kassig remembered their 26-year-old son, who was seized in October 2013, as both a realist and an idealist.

Halliburton, the world's second-biggest oilfield services company, said today it is buying Baker Hughes, the world's No. 3 oilfield services provider, for $34.6 billion.

Preserved human parts — including an infant's head, a baby's foot and an adult heart — stolen from a medical museum in Thailand last month were discovered over the weekend in three boxes labeled as toys that were being shipped to Las Vegas.

Workers at DHL discovered five body parts when they X-rayed the boxes, then alerted the Thai police. They identified the man who shipped the boxes as Ryan McPherson, a 31-year-old American tourist, and questioned him and another American, Daniel Tanner, 33, about the packages.

A law student from London was found guilty in a secret terrorism trial of possessing a bomb-making document. Last Tuesday's verdict against 26-year-old law student Erol Incedal was made public today after a U.K. judge lifted an order that forbade the media from reporting it.

Incedal was also charged with committing acts preparatory to terrorism. The jury, the BBC reports, failed to reach a verdict on that charge, but Incedal, who had denied the allegations against him, could still face trial on the charge. The BBC added:

It's not a tiger, but they aren't sure what it is: That's what French police and armed forces have concluded after searching for two days for a mystery beast near Disneyland Paris, one of Europe's top tourist destinations.

The latest sighting of what is being described as a wildcat was Friday morning when truckers spotted it on a main road between Paris and eastern France. It was photographed several times Thursday in the town of Montevrain.

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