Krishnadev Calamur

It's not a tiger, but they aren't sure what it is: That's what French police and armed forces have concluded after searching for two days for a mystery beast near Disneyland Paris, one of Europe's top tourist destinations.

The latest sighting of what is being described as a wildcat was Friday morning when truckers spotted it on a main road between Paris and eastern France. It was photographed several times Thursday in the town of Montevrain.

The director of a pharmaceutical company that Indian authorities say supplied medicines for the mass sterilizations that left 13 women dead was arrested today, and the drugs manufactured by his company banned.

A report by FIFA has cleared Qatar and Russia of corruption in their successful bids to host the soccer World Cup, but the report has plunged the sport's governing body into more controversy.

The Indian doctor at the center of botched sterilizations that have led to at least 13 deaths has performed more than 50,000 similar operations during his career.

Updated at 12:55 pm. EST

Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the top U.S. military commander, told lawmakers today that the U.S. would consider sending some U.S. troops to fight alongside Iraqi forces in more complex missions against militants of the Islamic State.

He told the House Armed Services Committee that though Iraqi forces were tackling the militants, operations such as retaking the city of Mosul or restoring the border with Syria could need help.

Automaker Volkswagen announced today a new policy that would allow interaction with labor unions at its plant in Chattanooga, Tenn., but specifically excluded collective bargaining from what it's calling the Community Organization Engagement policy.

In a statement Wednesday, Volkswagen said the new policy would allow a "constructive dialogue" with groups, including labor unions.

Three U.S. Navy sailors were assaulted during a stop in Istanbul by members of a left-leaning Turkish political group.

The sailors, who were in civilian clothes, were from the USS Ross, a guided-missile destroyer that was docked nearby.

One of the main architects of the Affordable Care Act is being criticized for comments made last year in which he said the "stupidity of the American voter" was critical in getting the law to pass.

Veterans Day, which the U.S. is marking today, commemorates the end of World War I. In Europe, they call it Armistice Day, and these photographs are of celebrations in London in the form of red ceramic poppies that cover the ground around the Tower of London. There's a poppy for every member of Britain's former colonies who died in the war.

NPR's Ari Shapiro visited the site in August. Here's how he described them:

Newly revealed emails seen by The Wall Street Journal and other news organizations appear to show that automaker General Motors ordered a half-million replacement ignition switches nearly two months before it alerted regulators to a defect in the switches that has since been linked to 32 deaths.

Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton has the background for our Newscast unit. Here's what she says:

Republican challenger Ed Gillespie has conceded to Democratic incumbent Mark Warner in the U.S. Senate race in Virginia. The contest was one of two Senate races left undecided in Tuesday's midterms.

European and U.S. officials have arrested 17 people in a crackdown on underground online markets, including the Silk Road 2.0, that sell drugs and weapons, Europe's police agency said today in a statement.

Residents of Denton, Texas, voted Tuesday to ban hydraulic fracturing in the city.

According to unofficial results posted on the city's website, 58.64 percent of voters supported banning the controversial drilling method that is also called fracking; 41.36 percent voted against the proposition. It's the first time a city in the energy-friendly state has voted to ban fracking.

The vote is expected to be challenged, but Mayor Chris Watts said he would defend the ban.

A Palestinian man drove a minivan into a crowd of pedestrians in East Jerusalem today, killing one person and wounding at least 13 before he was shot dead by police. Israeli officials described the incident as a terrorist attack.

Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson pleaded no contest in his child abuse case, avoiding jail time after being indicted in September for using a wooden switch to punish his 4-year-old son.

The Associated Press reports that a judge in Conroe, Texas, agreed to the plea deal.

A Russian Taliban member today became the first military detainee from Afghanistan to appear in a federal court.

Irek Hamidullan appeared before U.S. Magistrate Judge David Novak at the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia in Richmond. He has been in U.S. custody since 2009, and was held at the Bagram airfield in Afghanistan. Last month, the White House said Hamidullan, who was captured on the battlefield in Afghanistan, would be brought into the U.S. criminal justice system.

How do you count all the rats in New York City? If one urban legend is to be believed, you don't have to: There are as many rats as people — 8 million.

Statistician Jonathan Auerbach decided to test that idea. We'll get to how many rats he found in a bit. First, consider some of the daunting challenges he faced in trying to get a head count.

The world's largest film industry, by the number of movies produced, has barred women from working as makeup artists for nearly six decades. But that may be changing.

The country's Supreme Court said Monday that it wouldn't allow this "constitutionally impermissible discrimination" to go on.

Pages