Krishnadev Calamur

In 2010, Republican Bob Inglis lost his congressional seat to a Tea Party candidate because, among other things, he accepted climate change. Today, the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation named Inglis the 2015 recipient of the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for political courage.

The foundation said in a statement:

Sixty-three percent of people who took part in a global survey of religious attitudes say they are religious, according to WIN/Gallup International, the organization that carried out the polling.

The poll also found that 22 percent said they were not religious while about 11 percent said they were "convinced atheists," according to the poll published today. It surveyed nearly 64,000 people in 65 countries.

Far-right French icon Jean-Marie Le Pen says he will not run in the upcoming regional elections — just days after falling out with his daughter and political successor, Marine Le Pen, over his comments about Germany's gas chambers and France's wartime leadership.

Jordan Spieth, 21, won the Masters on Sunday with a record-tying score. The focus Monday morning is on American golf's new hero — whom The New York Times is calling "a composite of several of the best golfers the United States has produced."

China is restricting visits by residents of the city of Shenzhen to neighboring Hong Kong, reports Xinhua, the official Chinese news agency. The move, NPR's Frank Langfitt tells our Newscast unit, is "designed to assuage Hong Kongers angry with mainlanders who buy up goods."

Under the new rules, Shenzhen residents will be allowed one trip per week to Hong Kong. Xinhua quoted an official as saying the move "reflects the central government's consideration for people's livelihood in Hong Kong."

Novelist Günter Grass, the Nobel laureate who is perhaps best known for his novel The Tin Drum and who shocked his country when he revealed in 2006 that he had been a member of the Waffen SS in the last months of World War II, has died. Grass was 87.

The news was announced by his publisher, Steidl Verlag, in a statement on its website. The publisher said Grass died at a clinic in the town of Lübeck, Germany. It did not provide a cause of death.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced today that she is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination for the 2016 election.

Dashcam video released by the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division shows a routine traffic stop by Officer Michael Slager in North Charleston that eventually resulted in Walter Scott, 50, running from the vehicle.

Ride-hailing service Uber has launched a new service in the Indian capital of New Delhi — for auto rickshaws, the popular three-wheeled vehicles.

The big difference between UberAuto and the ride-hailing service's other offerings worldwide: You pay the autos, as the vehicles are known in India, only in cash. Fares are set by the state.

Editor's note on April 24: An image from the video taken by a witness has been removed from this post because the copyright holder has rescinded the permission he granted to the AP to distribute that content.

Michael Slager, the former North Charleston, S.C., police officer who was charged this week with shooting an unarmed black man in the back, killing him, was exonerated in 2013 of accusations that he used excessive force against another unarmed man he thought was a suspect.

The National Rifle Association, which supports Second Amendment rights, is holding its annual convention in Nashville, Tenn., this weekend. So it came as a surprise to see headlines that said the expected 80,000 people attending the gun-rights group's convention will not be allowed to carry their firearms.

The truth, as it turns out, is more complicated.

There will be "strong indications" of alien life within a decade and "definite evidence" of it within 20 to 30 years, NASA's chief scientist has said.

Would you lead a more active lifestyle if it meant lower life insurance premiums? Insurer John Hancock and Vitality, a global wellness firm, are hoping the answer is yes. But there is a condition: They get to track your activity.

The practice is already employed in Australia, Europe, Singapore and South Africa, where Vitality is based.

A U.S. service member was killed and several other American troops wounded when a man in an Afghan army uniform opened fire in the city of Jalalabad, a Pentagon official says.

NPR's Tom Bowman tells us there is no word on the condition of the wounded. The man in the Afghan uniform was shot and killed.

The incident occurred after a meeting between a senior U.S. official and the provincial governor in Jalalabad, according to a statement from the U.S. Embassy in Kabul.

Ride-sharing services are changing the way Americans commute, but just how big their impact is can be gauged by a report released Tuesday.

In the first quarter of 2015, Uber accounted for 46 percent of rides expensed by workers whose employers use Certify, the No. 2 provider of expense-reporting software in North America. Uber's market share in the first quarter of 2014 was 15 percent. Uber's rival Lyft accounted for 1 percent of rides in the first quarter of this year.

The fate of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is in the hands of the jury that is deciding whether to convict the 21-year-old who has admitted to being the Boston Marathon bomber.

Greece says Germany owes it more than $300 billion in World War II-era reparations for the Nazi occupation of the country.

"According to our calculations, the debt linked to German reparations is 278.7 billion euros," Deputy Finance Minister Dimitris Mardas told a parliamentary committee that is investigating Greece's debt crisis.

The figure, which is about $305.17 billion, comes from the country's General Accounting Office and includes an occupation loan the Nazis forced the Bank of Greece to make.

Comedian Jon Stewart, host of Comedy Central's The Daily Show, is defending Trevor Noah, the man named to succeed him, a week after critics said some of the South African comedian's more than 9,000 tweets were sexist and anti-Semitic.

In the opening monologue to Monday night's show, Stewart said:

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., announced today that he will seek the 2016 GOP presidential nomination.

"I have a message — a message that is loud and clear and does not mince words," he told supporters in Louisville, Ky. "We've come to take our country back."

Last week Gertrude Weaver of Arkansas became the world's oldest person. Weaver died Monday at the age of 116. The cause was complications from pneumonia, according to KATV.

Weaver died at the Silver Oaks Health and Rehabilitation Center in Camden, Ark., where she was a resident, the TV station reported.

Two Air India pilots have been grounded by the airline after getting into an apparent physical altercation in the cockpit.

The Times of India, which first reported the story on Sunday's incident, quoted an unnamed source saying:

Updated at 1:39 p.m. ET

The fraternity at the heart of the retracted Rolling Stone article on campus rape says it plans to pursue "all available legal action against the magazine."

"After 130 days of living under a cloud of suspicion as a result of reckless reporting by Rolling Stone magazine, today the Virginia Alpha Chapter of Phi Kappa Psi announced plans to pursue all available legal action against the magazine," the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity said in a statement.

A judge is allowing a Brooklyn, N.Y., woman to serve her elusive husband divorce summons via Facebook.

In his decision dated March 27, Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Matthew Cooper said Ellanora Biadoo could file for divorce from Victor Sena Blood-Dzraku using a private Facebook message. He wrote:

Updated at 5:16 p.m. ET

Prosecutors and lawyers for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev made their closing arguments Monday, the final step before the jury decides whether to convict the accused Boston Marathon bomber.

"There was nothing about this day that was a twist of fate," Assistant U.S. Attorney Aloke Chakravarty told the jurors. "This was a cold, calculated terrorist act. This was intentional. It was bloodthirsty. It was to make a point. It was to tell America that 'We will not be terrorized by you anymore. We will terrorize you.'"

Updated at 11:39 a.m.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and his son Jeb Bush Jr. have responded to a news report that the likely Republican presidential candidate self-identified as Hispanic in a 2009 voter-registration application.

The pope's doctors are telling him to lay off pasta and get more exercise.

The Italian news agency ANSA is reporting that the 78-year-old pontiff's doctors told him to get more exercise and cut back his pasta intake to twice a week. But Pope Francis, who reportedly eats a plate of spaghetti every day, has not taken well to the suggestions; one doctor tells ANSA the pope is an "undisciplined" patient.

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is insisting that any final agreement with Iran over its nuclear program include a "clear and unambiguous Iranian commitment of Israel's right to exist."

The public reaction in the Iranian capital to the preliminary agreement Iran and six world powers have reached on the Islamic republic's nuclear program has so far been positive.

The New York Times corespondent in Tehran tweeted:

President Obama's remarks were broadcast live on Iranian state TV.

Updated at 1:13 a.m. ET

German prosecutors say the co-pilot of the Germanwings plane who crashed the aircraft into the French Alps on March 24 apparently used his tablet computer to search the Internet for ways to commit suicide and for the safety features of cockpit doors. Separately, French prosecutors say the second black box of Flight 4U 9525 has been recovered.

An Indian scientific journal has retracted a paper on plagiarism because — wait for it — sections of it were plagiarized.

Pages