Laura Knoy

Host, The Exchange

Laura is well known in New Hampshire for her in-depth coverage of important issues and is widely regarded for her interviews with presidential hopefuls. Laura is a graduate of Keene High School in New Hampshire. Prior to hosting The Exchange, Laura worked in public radio in Washington, D.C. as a local reporter and announcer for WAMU and as a newscaster for NPR. Before her radio career, she was a researcher for USA Today's "Money" section, and a research assistant at the Institute for International Economics. Laura occasionally guest hosts national programs such as The Diane Rehm Show and Here and Now. In 2007 Laura was named New Hampshire Broadcaster of the Year by the New Hampshire Association of Broadcasters.

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New Hampshire adopted these new public school standards several years ago... one of forty five states to do so. Now, while many districts are on the path, more pushback has developed in some communities, especially from groups suspicious of outside involvement in local public education.  Today we'll look at the current debates around Common Core.

Guests:

Next week on The Exchange:

Sara Plourde

It’s our Friday New Hampshire News Roundup.   Executive Councilor Ray Burton, a fixture of North Country Politics says he won’t seek re-election next year due to health reasons.  A Legislative committee opens an ethics investigation into a former Senate President and the Granite State goes crazy once again…as the Boston Red Sox win the World Series. We'll look at the top stories of the week of October 28th!

Guests

NPR's Carrie Johnson

Oct 31, 2013
Doby Photography / NPR

We sit down with NPR’s  Justice Correspondent Carrie Johnson. She has covered a wide range of issues that have included the challenges facing voting rights laws, the Obama’s administration use of drones against suspected terrorists overseas and the recent furor over NSA leaks.

GUESTS:

In his new book, New Hampshire’s Ben Kilham describes what he’s learned in his twenty years studying these creatures.   Contrary to their image as solitary and not-that-intelligent, Kilham finds bears capable of altruism, and cooperation. He even finds them possess a complex communication system, as well as social  behaviors that at times look a lot like ours.

GUEST:

http://www.nh.gov/nhdoc/facilities/concord.html

With rising numbers of Granite Staters incarcerated, and ever-present budget constraints, some argue that it’s time to reform our approach to crime and punishment. But balancing innovation with public safety remains a concern. We’ll look at that latest thinking about some of the ideas out there- from alternative sentencing to rehabilitation.

GUESTS:

In a new book called “Saved”, author Ben Hewitt explores a different way of looking at wealth. Rather than dwelling on monetary standards and what can be lost financially, Hewitt writes through experience of what can be gained when we prioritize personal relationships, community cooperation, and connectedness to the environment.

Guest:

  • Ben Hewitt - Vermont based author. His new book is called "Saved: How I Quit Worrying about Money and Became the Richest Guy in the World"

Next week on The Exchange:

Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're following some of the top stories of the week, from Common Core heating up, to the sale of NH rest area names, to the World Series opening games.

GUESTS:

  • Ben Leubsdorf- staff reporter at the Concord Monitor, covering New Hampshire politics and state government
  • Josh Rogers - NHPR's senior political reporter
  • Dean Spiliotes: Civic Scholar in the School of Arts and Sciences at Southern New Hampshire University and author of the website NHPoliticalCapital.com.

Addressing Arsenic

Oct 24, 2013
mikecogh / Flickr Creative Commons

Most well-known as a poison once used between political or personal rivals, arsenic is now causing more problems at very low levels in our well water and food. We're looking into the sources of arsenic, the toxic effects it has on our health, and how to remediate it.

GUESTS:

Passive Income Dream.com / Flickr Creative Commons

The special commission that debated New Hampshire options all summer has made its report.  Two members of that commission talk with us about what happened, why, and where we go from here.

GUESTS:

  • Cindy Rosenwald – five-term Democratic representative from Nashua and a member of the finance committee
  • Charlie Arlinghaus -  president of the Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy, a free-market think tank based in Concord.

By looking at corporate and financial structures from an historical perspective, Smith contends that over four decades our middle class has been dismantled and that we have become two Americas.

GUEST:

  • Hedrick Smith - author, prize-winning investigative reporter and documentary producer. Among the books that Smith has written are The Power Game: How Washington Works and Rethinking America.

*Hedrick Smith will be appearing at Gibson’s Bookstore in Concord on Tuesday, October 22nd at 7.

Faith Meixell / NHPR

Our sky guys join us with the latest news on space - starting with how the shutdown affected our monitoring programs. We also talk about the Orionid meteor showers, two missions to Mars, and a new iPhone app for checking the location of spy satellites.

GUEST:

Next week on The Exchange:

Sara Plourde / NHPR

We're following some of the top stories of the week, from Kelly Ayotte’s national visibility, to the Medicaid Commission’s final recommendation, to one graffiti case opened and another closed.

GUESTS:

•Norma Love- Statehouse Reporter for the Associated Press

Dean Spiliotes: civic scholar in the school of arts and sciences at Southern New Hampshire University and author of the website nhpoliticalcapital.com.

Politics Of The Shutdown

Oct 17, 2013
jessie owen / Flickr Creative Commons

Granite State politicians weigh in on the politics in Washington that led to the shutdown, as well as the way forward.

Guests:

  • Ray Buckley- Chairman of New Hampshire Democratic Party
  • Gene Chandler- Republican House Minority Leader from Bartlett.
  • Andy Smith - Director of the UNH Survey Center and Associate Professor of Political Science

Callout:

  • Tim Carter - Leader of the Lakes Region Tea Party
SpeakerBoehner / Flickr Creative Commons

With a deadline looming for the US to hit its borrowing limit, and amid a lengthening partial federal shutdown, we’re looking at the latest efforts in Washington to resolve this, and also at the impact on our country and our state.

Guest:

  • Matthew J. Slaughter is professor and associate dean at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He is also currently an adjunct Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a member of the Congressional Budget Office's Panel of Economic Advisers.

In this new approach to the Civil War, Wineapple provides the reader with a sense of the passions and tragedies of the era, including character studies of the vibrant and flawed personalities behind the scenes.

GUEST:

  • Brenda Wineapple – teaches literature at both New York's New School University and Columbia University.  Wineapple is also professor of modern literary and historical studies at Union College.  Her previous book is White Heat: the Friendship of Emily Dickinson and Thomas Wentworth Higginson.
Shyam Subramanian / Flickr Creative Commons

The subjects of science, technology, engineering, and math are all the rage these days among politicians, business and education leaders who say we need more emphasis on these subjects to compete globally. But others say we’re going overboard on STEM and that society benefits from a broader approach that includes the arts, communication, and critical thinking.

Guests:

Next week on The Exchange:

We'll start the week with a rebroadcast of a favorite show about STEM and liberal arts education. Next, the book Ecstatic Nation, about the American Civil War. Later in the week, we'll check in with developments in the debt ceiling negotiations, and end on Friday with our weekly New Hampshire news roundup. E-mail us to share your thoughts or questions ahead of time at exchange@nhpr.org and join us all next week, every morning live at 9am, and again at 8pm.

Sara Plourde

Among other news this week, Granite Staters continue to feel the strain from the partial Federal government shutdown, the special commission studying Medicaid expansion recommends a plan to go forward,a deal is struck to sell granite state wind power to the bay state, and Portsmouth debates the merits of a man-made ice rink at Strawbery Banke.

GUESTS:

In a new book, Bacevich claims that Americans have failed their soldiers and their country, by entering conflicts he calls “unwinnable”.   A U.S. Army veteran, Bacevich also examines the disconnect between those who fight the wars and the rest of the country.  He says national defense must return to idea of “We the People”.

GUEST:

starbuck77 / Flickr Creative Commons

A week into a government shutdown, with a looming debt ceiling crisis, politicians remain rooted in their positions.  Many people wonder if we’ve become partisan to a fault, with both sides refusing to contemplate compromise. We’ll look at how we got here and whether we’ve run out of solutions.

GUESTS:

afagen / Flickr Creative Commons

Started as the Manchester Daily Union, the Union Leader grew to be the state’s largest newspaper. Over the past century and a half it has had its challenges- from criticism by some for its conservative slant, to facing the financial struggles of many mid-sized papers.  We’re taking a look at the legacy of the Union Leader.

GUESTS:

Just reappointed for a sixth term, Van McLeod’s agency oversees Libraries, Historical resources, and the state Council on the Arts. With the tighter budgets of recent years, his department has had to adjust, but he says it continues to be a key factor in the state’s prosperity and quality of life. 

Guest

  • Van McLeod - Commissioner for New Hampshire's Department of Cultural Resources.
Sara Plourde

It’s our Friday New Hampshire News Roundup!   The Federal Government Shutdown shows up in the Granite State, with lots of questions about short and long-term impacts.  New Hampshire experiences the rollout of the Affordable Care Act’s new Health Insurance Marketplaces.  And Granite State equestrians protest proposed new rules about how and where they can ride.  We look at New Hampshire news stories that Granite Staters are talking about for the week of September 30th.

Guests

mailemae59 / Flickr Creative Commons

As another debt ceiling deadline looms, on top of a government shutdown, we’ll look at what our nation’s defining document, particularly the fourteenth amendment, says about federal debt, as well as the roles of Congress and the President. 

GUESTS:

401(K) 2012 / Flickr Creative Commons

As of yesterday, Americans can shop for coverage on these exchanges, set up by the Affordable Care Act. But many people are unaware of these marketplaces and many more have lots of questions- from who’s eligible, to what coverage is available, to how much it might cost.

GUESTS:

jacqueline.poggi / Flickr Creative Commons

With a partial Government closing now in effect – some services will continue, such as the military and the mail. But others won’t- from National forests and Parks to federally-backed loans.   We’ll look at the politics and the economics of this, and gauge reaction in the granite state.

GUESTS:

An Opening In Iran?

Sep 30, 2013
757Live / Flickr Creative Commons

After more than three decades of tension and distrust, a new President and his charm offensive have caused hopes for better relations. But skepticism remains… about what Iran’s intentions are – and how other actors like Syria and Israel could play a role.

GUESTS:

Bill Martel, professor at the Fletcher School at Tufts University. His most recent book is called "Victory in War"

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