Laura Wagner

On Sunday night, the New York Giants celebrated a thrilling 30-27 win over the San Francisco 49ers.

But one player wasn't there to join in the jubilation.

Updated 12:59 a.m. ET

The New York Mets rout the Los Angeles Dodgers 13-7, and now lead the series 2-1.

Updated 7:22 p.m. ET

From suspended, to eligible, to benched, Los Angeles Dodgers second baseman Chase Utley is not in the starting lineup for tonight's game against the New York Mets.

The safety of the Metro in Washington will now be the responsibility of federal authorities.

Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx said in a letter late Friday that the metro safety will be placed under Federal Transit Administration due to recent accidents, like an incident in January when the metro tunnel filled with smoke, killing one person.

Here we go: some international soccer news that doesn't involve FIFA President Sepp Blatter.

Bill Cosby is expected give a videotaped deposition Friday in a lawsuit brought by a woman named Judy Huth, who says Cosby sexually assaulted her at the Playboy Mansion in 1974, when she was 15.

Lawyers for the 78-year-old entertainer went before a Los Angeles Superior Court judge on Wednesday asking for the case to be dismissed.

NPR's Mandalit del Barco filed this report:

North Charleston, S.C., has reached a settlement with the family of an unarmed black man shot in the back and killed by a white police officer in April

Paul Prudhomme, the internationally renowned Louisiana chef who popularized Cajun and Creole cuisine around the world, died Thursday morning. He was 75.

It's hard to overstate Prudhomme's influence on Cajun and Creole food. JoAnn Clevenger, owner of Upperline restaurant in New Orleans, says Prudhomme modernized it but kept the distinctive flavors.

Spencer Stone, one of three Americans who thwarted a terror attack on a Paris-bound train this summer, was stabbed early Thursday morning in Sacramento, Calif., according to an Air Force spokesman.

Three members of one of the wealthiest and most politically well-connected families in Honduras have been indicted by the U.S. on money laundering charges.

According to the court document, three members of the Rosenthal family, along with their lawyer, are accused of laundering money for drug traffickers.

NPR's Carrie Kahn reports on the indictment that was unsealed after one of the men was arrested Tuesday in Miami:

The rain has stopped in South Carolina, but for people living along the coast, the worst of the flooding could still be ahead.

The floodwaters have not receded and as the water in the swollen rivers flow toward the ocean, more damaging high waters are expected.

As Laura Hunsberger reports for NPR, Gov. Nikki Haley says the state is ready:

Six days after communication was lost with the El Faro cargo ship as it drifted into the path of Hurricane Joaquin, the U.S. Coast Guard ended the search for survivors.

Of the 33 people aboard the ship, rescuers found one body on Monday:

"Several 'survival suits' were spotted floating in the water, one of which contained the body. In addition, an empty, heavily damaged lifeboat was found."

Updated 3:57 p.m. ET

The turmoil surrounding beleaguered FIFA President Sepp Blatter continues to churn.

On Wednesday, Blatter reportedy was told he is facing a provisional 90-day suspension, with a final decision from the FIFA ethics committee expected later this week.

The BBC quotes Blatter's adviser Klauss Stohlker as saying, "The news was communicated to the president this afternoon. He is calm. Remember he is the father of the ethics committee."

The signs read: "Take 'em down! Renoir sucks!" and "We're not iconoclasts[;] Renoir just sucks at painting!"

Led by Max Geller, a handful of people protested Monday outside Boston's Museum of Fine Arts.

Their grievance?

The fact that paintings by renowned French Impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir are hanging in the museum.

A former president of the U.N. General Assembly, John Ashe, is accused of accepting more than $1.3 million in bribes in return for his support of a real estate project in Macau, according to U.S. court documents.

Ashe is a former U.N. ambassador for Antigua and Barbuda who led the General Assembly from 2013 to 2014. He lives in New York state.

NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports:

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has issued nationwide custody standards governing how immigrants are treated when in U.S. Border Patrol custody.

The Associated Press reports that the regulations cover scenarios including "guarding an immigrant's personal belongings, properly using handcuffs and other restraints and setting thermostats."

President Obama will meet with the families of those killed and injured when a man opened fire at a community college in Oregon.

Nine people were killed and nine others were wounded when Chris Harper Mercer, 26, began shooting in a classroom last Thursday.

After the shooting, Obama delivered his most impassioned speech to date regarding the need for stricter gun control laws.

Ellen Kullman, the CEO of the chemical company DuPont, said Monday that she will retire on Oct. 16. The announcement follows falling stock prices as the company struggles in the global economy.

Edward Breen, a DuPont board member, will serve as Kullman's interim replacement.

NPR's Chris Arnold reports on the leadership change.

On the eve of the New York Yankees American League wild-card game against the Houston Astros, pitcher CC Sabathia issued a written statement that he was checking himself into alcohol rehab.

The Yankees released the statement. Here's part of it:

"Today I am checking myself into an alcohol rehabilitation center to receive the professional care and assistance needed to treat my disease.

Updated 5:30 p.m. ET

Extinguishing hope that the cargo ship that went missing near the Bahamas could have survived a Thursday encounter with Hurricane Joaquin, the Coast Guard announced Monday that the ship, El Faro, sank, according to the Associated Press. The Coast Guard also found an unidentified body of one crew member.

Remember that Chicago Cubs fan who may or may not have cost his team a crucial out in Game 6 of the 2003 National League Championship series against the Marlins?

No? Well, let's take a jaunt down memory lane:

Following last week's announcement that FIFA President Sepp Blatter is facing criminal proceedings in Switzerland for alleged corruption, Coca-Cola and McDonald's, two major FIFA World Cup Sponsors, called for his immediate resignation.

The company released a statement, saying:

"Every day that passes, the image and reputation of FIFA continues to tarnish. FIFA needs comprehensive and urgent reform, and that can only be accomplished through a truly independent approach."

Updated 7 p.m. ET

Pope Francis had a private meeting in Washington, D.C., with a gay couple a day before he met with Kentucky clerk Kim Davis, who spent time in jail last month for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

Yayo Grassi, Francis' longtime friend from Argentina, spoke about the meeting during an interview with CNN. Grassi says that he and his partner, Iwan Bagus, and several others met with the pontiff at the Vatican Embassy on Sept. 23.

Hackers have stolen the personal information of about 15 million T-Mobile customers and potential customers in the U.S., including Social Security numbers, dates of birth and home addresses.

Experian says it notified law enforcement as soon as it discovered the breach, NPR's Laura Sydell reports:

She also says:

Following the emissions scandal that rocked Volkswagen in late September, the German car company reported less than 1 percent growth in sales for the month.

Reuters reports that Volkswagen sales "increased by just 0.56 percent to 26,141 vehicles, showing the effect of the halt in sales" of the four-cylinder diesel cars that were found to have been outfitted with "defeat devices" to pass emissions tests.

In the latest embarrassment for the Secret Service, agents were found to have improperly accessed, shared and potentially released an unsuccessful 2003 Secret Service job application of Republican congressman Jason Chaffetz of Utah, according to a government report.

It says that the agents' actions stemmed from a desire to discredit Chaffetz, who was heading investigations of scandals inside the Secret Service.

The NCAA notched a victory on Wednesday when a federal appeals court ruled against requiring colleges to compensate athletes in deferred cash payments, according to the Associated Press.

Updated 5:35 p.m. With Oklahoma Delay

Convicted of orchestrating her husband's death in 1997, Kelly Gissendaner was executed in Jackson, Ga., on Tuesday evening, becoming the first woman in 70 years to be put to death in the state.

Ralph Lauren Corporation announced that Stefan Larsson has been named CEO, starting in November. The 75-year-old founder and face of the fashion mega-house, Ralph Lauren, will continue to "actively drive the company's vision," a company statement read.

Updated 6:20 p.m. ET

Southern Methodist University officials are considering an appeal of the NCAA's sanctions against the men's basketball program.

"There are a couple of things that we know we are going to consider, very seriously, appealing," SMU president Gerald Turner said, according to the Dallas ABC affiliate WFAA. He added that head basketball coach Larry Brown had his full support.

Journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates, puppetry artist Basil Twist and neuroscientist Beth Stevens work in wholly unrelated fields, but they do have at least one thing in common.

Along with 21 others, they are winners of the 2015 "genius" grants from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

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