Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

This past week, a FedEx employee from Germantown, Tenn., made a massive discovery — and it wasn't in any packages. John Pace found the largest prime number known to humankind.

And that number goes on to more than 23 million digits.

"So it's longer than anybody really wants to sit down and hear," he says.

If you're not great at math, here's a primer: Prime numbers can only be divided by 1 and themselves.

Just off a Houston freeway, in a strip mall with an Indian tailor and South Asian grocery store, is a small restaurant with an out-size reputation. It's called Himalaya and its chef and owner is a Houston institution.

Chef Kaiser Lashkari is a large man with a bushy salt-and-pepper mustache. He's constantly in motion — greeting clients, inspecting steaming dishes carried by busy waiters, calling out to his wife overseeing the kitchen. He offers us food before we've even sat down.

If you're reading this through some kind of Bluetooth or Wi-Fi gadget, here's an interesting fact: Some ideas behind that technology can be traced back to a famous actress from the 1930s. Her name was Hedy Lamarr.

Kebabs, tikka masala, biryani, naan – these Indian dishes are well-known worldwide. But, you may soon see a new Indian dessert joining their ranks at your favorite Indian shops and restaurant.

Rosogolla, a round confection made with cottage cheese and sugar syrup, is a relatively cheap popular sweet treat in India, says Madhumita Saha, an opinion writer for World Is One News (WION).

"It's as good as baklava," she says.

Like many Americans, Chris Michel woke up Monday morning to the horrific news of the massacre in Las Vegas, which left 58 people dead as well as the shooter Stephen Paddock and nearly 500 injured.

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Since Hurricane Irma passed, it is not only families and businesses that are recovering from the storm. Animals are, too. NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro, the host of Weekend Edition Sunday, is in Miami, and she's been investigating how they fared.

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And now we return to our main story, the hurricane in Florida. My colleague Lulu Garcia-Navarro joins us from the newsroom at our member station WLRN in Miami. Hi, Lulu.

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Hi.

WERTHEIMER: So what is the latest where you are?

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And to recap our main story, Hurricane Irma is moving toward west coast Florida cities.

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For the second time in two weeks, there is a huge tropical storm that seems poised to hit the American mainland.

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As a new parent, Jack Gilbert got a lot of different advice on how to properly look after his child: when to give him antibiotics or how often he should sterilize his pacifier, for example.

After the birth of his second child, Gilbert, a scientist who studies microbial ecosystems at the University of Chicago, decided to find out what's actually known about the risks involved when modern-day children come in contact with germs.

Alan Alda's father wanted him to become a doctor, but it wasn't meant to be. "I failed chemistry really disastrously ... " Alda says. "I really didn't want to be a doctor; I wanted to be a writer and an actor."

Which is exactly what happened, but Alda didn't leave science behind entirely. His new book, If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?, is all about communication — and miscommunication — between scientists and civilians.

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And this is The Call-In. Today we're talking about drug crimes and criminal justice reform. Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a major change in policy this month.

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The CW's Jane the Virgin is both a send-up of and a love letter to Latin telenovelas. So, not surprisingly, its plot is a little complicated. In the first season, Jane (a virgin) becomes pregnant after being accidentally artificially inseminated with sperm from Rafael, a married businessman who starts to develop feelings for Jane. On top of that, Jane's father, telenovela star Rogelio De La Vega, is back in her life. From there, things only get more dramatic.

Christina Ricci's film career began early — at just 10 years old, she played the adorably malevolent Wednesday Addams in The Addams Family. From there, she went on to play fascinating and often dark and damaged characters, making a name for herself as an actress who could tap into complex roles.

Undergoing treatment for cancer is hard enough by itself. And for many cancer patients who spend most of their time in a hospital, it gets even harder with the loss of basic comforts. The hospital's sterile environment, the fluorescent lights and the disposable gowns do little to make medical treatment more bearable. Nikla Lancksweert, wanted to do a little something to help with that dehumanizing experience, focusing on an alternative for those uncomfortable hospital gowns.

This past November was a wake-up call for the Democratic Party. Many Democratic women, in particular, are feeling a strong need to answer that call.

Less than a quarter of elected positions are filled by women in the U.S. There are many reasons for that, but Democratic activist Diane Fink says women are often discouraged somewhere along the way. She runs Emerge Maryland, a group that helps Democratic women run for office.

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When I was down in Texas, I met a man who can be found singing over the sound of his blow dryer.

ALBERTO ESCOBEDO: (Singing in Spanish).

GARCIA-NAVARRO: Alberto Escobedo owns a salon in Rio Grande City, and he's always loved music, especially opera.

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Like most comedians, Cristela Alonzo draws upon her own experiences for her source material. That means, as a first-generation American, Alonzo has also always tackled challenging topics in her comedy. She now lives in California, but she grew up just 9 miles from the Mexico border, in San Juan, Texas.

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Now a different look at sports from the moment it leaves the field and how it influences our culture. This week...

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