Lynn Neary

Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent and a frequent guest host often heard on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

In her role on the Arts desk, Neary reports on an industry in transition as publishing moves into the digital age. As she covers books and publishing, she relishes the opportunity to interview many of her favorite authors from Barbara Kingsolver to Ian McEwan.

Arriving at NPR in 1982, Neary spent two years working as a newscaster during Morning Edition. Then, for the next eight years, Neary was the host of Weekend All Things Considered. In 1992, she joined the cultural desk to develop NPR's first religion beat. As religion correspondent, Neary covered the country's diverse religious landscape and the politics of the religious right.

Over the years Neary has won numerous prestigious awards including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism award, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Gold Award, an Ohio State Award, an Association of Women in Radio and Television Award and the Gabriel award. For her reporting on the role of religion in the debate over welfare reform, Neary shared in NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

A Fordham University graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in English, Neary thinks she has the ideal job and suspects she is the envy of English majors everywhere.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Celebration mixed with politics at last night's National Book Awards in New York City. The literary crowd was acutely aware that they were in the same city where President-elect Donald Trump is planning his transition. Joy is an act of resistance, said one of the winners. And that seemed to set the tone for the evening, as NPR's Lynn Neary reports. LYNN NEARY, BYLINE: About halfway through the award presentations...

For the first time, an American has won the Man Booker Prize, Britain's most coveted literary award. Paul Beatty will take home the award and the purse, 50,000 pounds (about $61,000), for his novel The Sellout , a satire about race in the U.S. Amanda Foreman, chair of the judges , called the book "a novel for our times," and said Beatty "slays sacred cows with abandon and takes aim at racial and political taboos with verve and a snarl." The Man Booker judges chose a distinctly American story...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: We're going to take a couple of minutes to remember writer Gloria Naylor, who died last week. She's best known for her award-winning novel "The Women of Brewster Place." Her work focused on the lives of African-American women. NPR's Lynn Neary has more. LYNN NEARY, BYLINE: When Gloria Naylor won the National Book Award for her first novel, "The Women of Brewster Place," in 1983, she told the audience that it was...

In the world of literary prizes Britain's Man Booker stands out as one of the most prestigious and lucrative. So every year writers and their publishers and agents are eager to learn who made the final cut. Today the six writers who made it to the short list were revealed. Two Americans, two Brits and two Canadians are now competing for the award which is given each year for a novel written in English which has been published in the U.K. According to the award's own website, this year's...

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In this age of social media, where nothing is either sacred or secret, author J.K. Rowling wants nothing short of a miracle. She has asked theatergoers who attend previews of Harry Potter and the Cursed Child in London not to reveal the plot of the play. She made her request in a video posted online after previews began . Of course, Googling "J.K. Rowling" " Cursed Child " and "secret" yields both that video and the entire plot of the play in one simple search. Let's face it, even for J.K....

Author Emma Cline's debut novel, The Girls , was inspired by the infamous Manson family murders. But Cline says it wasn't the cult that fascinated her; she was more interested in exploring how a young girl can brush up against evil without even realizing it. During adolescence, Cline says, a young girl wants to be seen more than anything. The 20-something author remembers that feeling: When she was a young girl, an older man took an interest in her as she was walking down the street. She was...

How do you like your coffee? Black with sugar? Lots of milk, no sugar? Hazelnut flavored? Not so much? Well, how about your iced coffee? Me, I like it with a lot of ice ... can't stand it when a barista drops a few measly ice cubes into my cup, which melt before I have even finished drinking the coffee. Make that drink really cold, I say. Give me some ice to chew on now. So I was doubly perplexed when I heard that a woman named Stacy Pincus has filed a class-action suit against Starbucks...

Growing up in Pennsylvania coal country, writer Jennifer Haigh learned that a lot of what matters in the state can't be seen. It lies beneath the surface, in the form of potential energy. She saw how the boom and bust cycles of mining affected the people of her hometown, which is now poised on the brink of fracking. She's taken what she knows and turned it into a new novel, Heat and Light . But Haigh says she doesn't think of it as a book about fracking. "I think it's a book about the soul of...

From Mexico City's Zócalo to Rome's Piazza Navona, public squares have always been a vibrant part of urban life. After visiting Italy a few years back, editor Catie Marron began thinking about the different roles these public spaces have played. She asked some well-known writers to share their thoughts about famous squares around the world, and the resulting essays are gathered in a new book called City Squares . Michael Kimmelman, one of the participating writers, says what's important about...

Peering back across Harper Lee's life, it can seem impossible to distinguish the novelist from her masterpiece, To Kill a Mockingbird . Lee died at the age of 89 in her hometown of Monroeville, Ala., on Friday morning — yet it's clear that her legacy will live on much longer than that, through her characters and the readers who have embraced them for decades. "America and the world knew Harper Lee as one of the last century's most beloved authors," Hank Conner, Lee's nephew, announced in a...

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S78RzZr3IwI http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnZiqUaPLZ0 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FnO3igOkOk Editor's note: Sure, you could read a story about speech patterns and dialogue, but where's the fun in that? We strongly recommend you click the Listen link above to get the full effect. Theatergoers and book lovers learned earlier this week that screenwriter Aaron Sorkin will be adapting To Kill a Mockingbird for a Broadway production. So what will this beloved...

When Harper Lee's Go Set a Watchman was published earlier this year, readers learned that this much anticipated "second book" by Lee was actually a first draft of what would later become the beloved To Kill a Mockingbird . Lee radically revised this early version of the book on the advice of her editor, Tay Hohoff. That made us wonder: How much do editors shape the final book we read? On hearing the news about the role Lee's editor played in the creation of To Kill a Mockingbird, Pulitzer...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Over the years, James Patterson has gone from advertising executive to best-selling author and lately to advocate of literacy and reading, through scholarships and grants to school libraries. Today, to celebrate the season, Patterson is announcing more grants and also holiday bonuses for independent bookstore employees around the United States. NPR's Lynn Neary has more. LYNN NEARY, BYLINE: James...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Now in this week that has forced us to think about security and culture and civilization, it is fitting that people have taken a moment to honor writers. They're the people who got us to think more deeply about ourselves. The National Book Awards were announced last night in New York City. NPR's Lynn Neary was at the publishing industry's annual celebration of the written word. LYNN NEARY, BYLINE:...

The 1920s had Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald. The '60s, Norman Mailer, Philip Roth and James Baldwin. More recently, J.K. Rowling defined a generation. And now, there's ... PewDiePie? PewDiePie hit it big on YouTube as a funny guy who likes to play video games, but isn't very good at it. And now he's one of three YouTubers — the others are Tyler Oakley and Shane Dawson -- currently enjoying prominent positions on various best-seller lists (warning, the videos on those linked pages...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: For a long time, bookstores have worried about Amazon putting them out of business. And lots of bookstores, big and small, have shut down. Those that have survived have been feeling more secure lately. Traditional book sales are doing well. But, there's something new to worry about. Amazon opened its first permanent bookstore - meaning, one you can walk into - in its hometown of Seattle today. NPR's...

Nobel Prize winner Orhan Pamuk loves Istanbul. But he is a creature of the affluent corners of the city where he grew up and now lives, and he has written many times about the lives of Istanbul's secular upper class. His latest novel, A Strangeness in My Mind , is the story of a street peddler, one of the millions who began immigrating to Istanbul in the 1950s from small villages in the country. On the cover of the book, underneath its paper jacket, is a picture of a city filled with...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: The winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature was announced this morning. Now, usually this honor goes to a poet or a playwright or a novelist. But this year, a journalist gets the prize. She is the Belarusian writer Svetlana Alexievich, who writes about the former Soviet Union. Well, we say she's a journalist. But actually, in announcing the award, the Swedish Academy said Alexievich has devised a new genre. NPR's...

The shortlist of nominees for the prestigious Man Booker literary award was announced today in London. On the one hand, as the Man Booker committee noted, it's a diverse list. On the other hand, two of the short-listed nominees are American, which could make some British authors unhappy. This is only the second year that the prestigious literary award has been open to writers who are not from a British Commonwealth country and that has been controversial in the U.K. The Man Booker is a much...

Every so often, a genuine publishing phenomenon emerges. The latest one is no Harry Potter, but the reason for its meteoric rise to the top of Amazon's best-seller list is self-evident. On the cover of Carl- Johan Forssen Ehrlin 's self-published The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep there's a sign that reads, "I can make anyone fall asleep" — and that's a promise sleep-deprived parents can't resist. "They will go to anyone or anything that promises them heaven — your baby sleeping," says sleep...

E.L. Doctorow used to tell a story about a journalism class he took as a high school student in the Bronx. As he told NPR back in 2003, he wrote a profile of a doorman at Carnegie Hall who was beloved by all the performers there. His teacher, apparently, loved the story so much, she wanted to publish the story in the school paper — so she told Doctorow to get a photo of the man. There was just one problem. "I hadn't expected that kind of enthusiasm," Doctorow recalled, "and I said, well, 'Not...

Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors. Last year, the lack of diversity on author panels at BookCon spawned the We Need Diverse Books campaign, which in turn sparked renewed conversation about the lack of diversity in publishing. Ellen Oh, one of We Need...

Chinese writers and publishers are being celebrated this week in New York at BookExpo America — the industry's largest trade event in North America. Organizers of the event say China deserves a seat at the table because it is such a big and potentially lucrative market. But some authors and free speech advocates have seen this as an opportunity to shine light on censorship in China. Most of the books in the exhibition area are in Chinese, but Paul Myatovich presides over a display of books in...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript SCOTT SIMON, HOST: This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. A major publishing house thinks that combining two old forms of media - books and vinyl records - might be a great way to win over more young fans. HarperCollins is releasing a vinyl edition of Amy Poehler's "Yes Please" in September. As NPR's Lynn Neary reports, it is one part marketing and one part legitimate experiment. LYNN NEARY, BYLINE: Amy...

When restaurateur Nora Pouillon moved to the United States from Austria in the 1960s, she was surprised by how hard it was to get really fresh food. Everything was packaged and processed. Pouillon set out to find the find the best ingredients possible to cook for her family and friends. She brought that same sensibility to her Restaurant Nora, which eventually became the first certified organic restaurant in the country. Pouillon writes about her lifelong devotion to food in a new memoir, My...

In recent years while e-books were plowing their way through the publishing industry like a big noisy steam engine, audiobooks were chugging along in the background like the Little Engine That Could. These days, that sometimes overlooked segment of the book business is growing at a rapid pace and the industry is looking for new ways to catch listeners' ears. Robin Whitten, editor and founder of Audiofile magazine, began writing about audiobooks in 1992. Back then, few people had ever heard of...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: The documentary filmmaker Albert Maysles has died. Maysles and his brother David made the groundbreaking documentaries "Gimme Shelter" and "Grey Gardens" among others. Maysles was still making films when he died. He was 88. NPR's Lynn Neary has this remembrance. LYNN NEARY, BYLINE: The Maysles brothers first drew attention to their work with the 1968 film "Salesman." They followed four salesmen as they...

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