Maggie Martin

Maggie Martin is host of Morning Edition at Alabama Public Radio. The popular news program airs every weekday morning starting at 5:00 AM. For over three decades, Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with news stories, interviews and commentaries. Maggie highlights the wide range of programming featured on Morning Edition, from the informative to the quirky.

A native of Rochester, N.Y., Maggie started her public radio career as a reporter and weekend news anchor at WFUV based out of Fordham University in New York City. She filed daily news stories on the tri-state area and covered Hillary Clintonââ

The Salt
5:25 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Raising Tastier Sea Urchins For Foodies And The Environment

Sea urchins are considered a culinary delicacy, but supply can't keep up with demand.
Aizat Faiz Flickr

Originally published on Tue September 24, 2013 7:09 pm

Sea urchins are considered a culinary delicacy in many parts of the world, including Japan and the United States. The market for this "foie gras of the sea" is growing rapidly — so fast that supply can't keep up with demand.

But a scientist in Birmingham, Ala., says he's found a solution: He's built a sea urchin farm in his lab and has even developed a food for them to make them taste better. Now, he wants to take his tasty urchins out of his farm and into restaurants across the country.

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Dead Stop
3:50 am
Thu August 9, 2012

Uncovering Secrets Buried At A Neglected Cemetery

Volunteers have been collecting grave markers like these and trying to figure out where they go.
Maggie Martin NPR

Originally published on Thu August 9, 2012 11:07 am

At most cemeteries, hearing weed cutters and lawn mowers trimming grass around graves would seem normal enough. But at Lincoln Cemetery in Montgomery, Ala., these are the sounds of progress.

Lincoln Cemetery was established in 1907 for African-Americans. But with no one in charge of the cemetery or keeping up with burial records, abuse, vandalism and neglect became rampant and the cemetery is in disrepair. Grass and weeds grew three feet high. People picked apart old, crumbling graves and took bones of the deceased.

And no one is quite where people are actually buried.

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