Mara Liasson

Mara Liasson is the national political correspondent for NPR. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines All Things Considered and Morning Edition. Liasson provides extensive coverage of politics and policy from Washington, DC — focusing on the White House and Congress — and also reports on political trends beyond the Beltway.

Each election year, Liasson provides key coverage of the candidates and issues in both presidential and congressional races. During her tenure she has covered six presidential elections — in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012. Prior to her current assignment, Liasson was NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Clinton administration. She has won the White House Correspondents Association's Merriman Smith Award for daily news coverage in 1994, 1995, and again in 1997. From 1989-1992 Liasson was NPR's congressional correspondent.

Liasson joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter and newscaster. From September 1988 to June 1989 she took a leave of absence from NPR to attend Columbia University in New York as a recipient of a Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Economics and Business Journalism.

Prior to joining NPR, Liasson was a freelance radio and television reporter in San Francisco. She was also managing editor and anchor of California Edition, a California Public Radio nightly news program, and a print journalist for The Vineyard Gazette in Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

Liasson is a graduate of Brown University where she earned a bachelor's degree in American history.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Donald Trump is the GOP delegate leader and has the clearest path to the presidential nomination of any remaining candidate. But does he have an electoral path to 270 in November? There's a basic math problem for any Republican nominee. In every one of the past six presidential elections, Democrats have won states that add up to about 240 electoral votes — pretty close to the majority needed to win. Republicans have won about 103 electoral votes in each of the past six elections, so there's a...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST: Donald Trump's path to the Republican nomination appears to be pretty straight if he is the GOP nominee. What about his path to a majority in the electoral college? Well, here's NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson. MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: In every one of the past six presidential elections, Democrats have won states that add up to about 240 electoral votes - not far from the 270 it takes...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: The race for president is clearer today, much more so on the Democratic side. Hillary Clinton clearly won 4 of the 5 states that voted yesterday, and in the fifth state, Missouri, she holds a razor-thin lead. On the Republican side, Donald Trump won three states and advanced his delegate lead. NPR's Mara Liasson is back here once again to tell us what these results mean. Hey, Mara. MARA LIASSON, BYLINE:...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: Donald Trump had a big day, though he lost this state, Ohio, and he still faces many doubters. Hillary Clinton did not generate wild enthusiasm, but she had another big day as well, taking Ohio, Florida, Illinois, North Carolina and potentially Missouri, though that state is still too close to call. Neither front-runner has wrapped up the nomination, but each now has some space to turn against the other...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: As you've no doubt heard by now, this is a big day in the presidential race with some big primaries happening. Voters are at the polls in Ohio, North Carolina, Missouri, Florida and Illinois. To talk about what's at stake, NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is back here in the studio with us. Hi, Mara. MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi, Ari. SHAPIRO: How much will tonight clarify the race for both...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Did you think we were done with presidential primary debates? Come on. The four remaining Republicans will meet again tonight in Miami. On Tuesday, five big states vote. Many of them are winner-take-all, which means the delegate count could either strengthen Donald Trump's lead or give other candidates fresh reasons to stay in the race. Joining us for a preview of tonight's debate is NPR national...

The remaining four Republican candidates debate once again tonight, this time in Miami. Donald Trump, Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and John Kasich will be on the stage together for the last time before next Tuesday's big primary night, when voters in Ohio and Florida — Rubio and Kasich's home states — go to the polls. Tuesday is a make or break night for the two of them and tonight's debate is the last chance they have to change the dynamic in a race that has not been going their way. Here are four...

Tonight the two Democratic candidates — Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders — meet in Miami for a debate. Before Tuesday night, the debate was looking like an unimportant afterthought to a race that could have been all wrapped up. But not anymore, after Sanders' stunningly unexpected win in Michigan last night. Here are three things to watch: 1. Delegates or momentum? Hillary Clinton's campaign says all that matters is delegates and by that measure she succeeded Tuesday night — increasing her...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript SHAPIRO: And I want to turn now to NPR's Mara Liasson here in the studio. Mara, tonight is not as big as Super Tuesday one week ago and perhaps not as big as when we'll hear from Ohio and Florida next week. But what conclusions can we take away from tonight? LIASSON: Well, one conclusion is that Ted Cruz was not able to do in Mississippi what he did over the weekend. And I think that because he won the Maine and Kansas...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Voters are going to the polls today in Michigan and Mississippi. Republicans are also voting in Idaho and Hawaii. Michigan has a whopping 59 Republican delegates and 130 Democratic delegates. That's why it's pivotal for both parties. Here to talk more about the current state of the race is NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Welcome back to the studio, Mara. MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Glad to...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The GOP may be in the midst of an identity crisis, but the Democratic Party is also facing a political crisis that could be made a lot worse if it doesn't win the White House in November. Here's why: Part of President Obama's legacy is the health of his party. He's had many successes in office — health care reform, climate change regulations, Wall Street reform — but his legacy will also include one huge failure: a diminished Democratic Party. Every president sees his party lose hundreds of...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: All right, there, as Sarah Said, it was a strong day of words on the campaign trail. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson is with us now to talk about what's been happening today. Hi, Mara. MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi, Kelly. MCEVERS: It seems as if the Republican establishment is waking up to the trashing that they've been taking from Donald Trump. Is that how you see it? Is that what's...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: For others in the Republican establishment, Trump's success is a bitter pill to swallow. Now, for the big picture, let's turn to NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. And, Mara, first, what happens next? I mean, does Donald Trump have the math? Has he wrapped this up? MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Well, he hasn't wrapped it up officially. He needs 1,273 delegates to do that. He doesn't have it,...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: Two numbers give some nuance to last night's Super Tuesday results. DAVID GREENE, HOST: You probably heard the headline by now. Hillary Clinton won most of the Democratic contests. Donald Trump won big on the Republican side. INSKEEP: One cautionary note for Trump is this. While he is winning states, he has fallen short of winning a majority of the convention delegates awarded so far. Ted Cruz and...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: It is Tuesday, and it is super. That's because 1 in 4 Americans have their say in the presidential nominating contests today, casting ballots or attending caucuses in 13 states. Roughly, a quarter of the total delegates are at stake in each party tonight. This is the biggest night of the season, and joining us to talk about what it all means is NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hey, Mara...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: I feel like I've said these words on this program before. Donald Trump won. This time it was the Nevada Republican caucuses, and he won by a large margin last night - more than 20 points ahead of second-place finisher Marco Rubio. Ted Cruz came in third. Trump now goes forward with a lot of momentum onto the next big primary season test, Super Tuesday on March 1, where delegates in 13 states are up for...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YY5vLy6s17o In any ordinary year, Donald Trump's big win in South Carolina on Saturday night would all but anoint him the Republican presidential nominee. That's especially true after his big win in New Hampshire, where he won with support across various age and income groups in the party. Trump should be a shoo-in. But this is no ordinary year, and Trump is no ordinary candidate. So why aren't more people talking about the race being over? Here are four...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: In any other year, a big win in South Carolina would all but anoint a presidential candidate as the nominee. Donald Trump has that now, and his big win in New Hampshire with support across various age and income groups in the Republican Party - he should be a shoo-in. But this is no ordinary year, and Trump is no ordinary candidate. Joining us now to talk about the Republican race for president is NPR...

Another big caucus day and primary night on Saturday, when Democrats go to their caucus sites in Nevada, and Republicans go to the polls in South Carolina. Here are five things we'll learn from the results: 1. Is insulting the Bush family — and getting into a fight with the pope — a good idea or not? Donald Trump has doubled down on almost everything in South Carolina. He called George W. Bush a liar in the last debate, causing the GOP establishment to gasp in horror. The Bushes are extremely...

Antonin Scalia's body wasn't cold before his seat on the U.S. Supreme Court became tangled up in partisan politics. Here are five ways Scalia's death is complicating the 2016 election. 1. Obama looms even larger: After two terms, this election was always going to be a referendum on the Obama presidency. The upcoming nomination battle (even if the Republicans refuse to hold hearings or votes on the nominee, there will still be a battle) will make that even more obvious. Hillary Clinton is a...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST: Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton sparred last night in one last debate before voters go to the polls in Nevada and South Carolina. Sanders, of course, is coming off his big win in New Hampshire. Now he's looking to connect with minority voters who make up a larger segment of the electorate in the upcoming contests. Clinton, meanwhile, was trying to regain her footing. NPR's national political correspondent...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Well, the polls in New Hampshire close in just a couple of hours, and it's shaping up to be an eventful night for both Democrats and Republicans. NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson is here to tell us what to watch for. Hey, Mara. MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Her, Ari. SHAPIRO: Let's start with the Republican side. Donald Trump has been drawing enthusiastic crowds in New Hampshire for months....

New Hampshire voters go to the polls Tuesday, and they will resolve a lot of questions. Here are four things the first-in-the-nation primary will tell us: 1. How much damage did the last debate do to Marco Rubio? Rubio came into New Hampshire with a head of steam. He quickly moved into second place in the polls, and there was even some hope he could overtake Donald Trump in the Granite State. But then, the needle got stuck on his talking points in the ABC debate on Saturday, earning him the...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

When seven of the nine remaining Republican candidates meet Saturday for their final debate before the New Hampshire primary on Tuesday, several of them will be facing their last chance to stay in the race. Here are three things to watch for at 8 p.m. ET when Jeb Bush, Ben Carson, Chris Christie, Ted Cruz, John Kasich, Marco Rubio and Donald Trump appear on stage at the ABC News debate in Manchester, N.H. Which Donald Trump will show up? Will it be the chastened Trump of his concession speech...

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