Matt Laslo

Correspondent

New Hampshire’s U.S. senators don’t often see eye to eye, but this week they’re teaming up trying to defeat a bill that would force businesses to collect online sales tax for the first time.

In the wake of the Newtown, Connecticut school shooting there’s been an increase in calls for gun control on Capitol Hill.

Photo by Mallory Benedict/PBS NewsHour / <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/newshour/7891799906/in/photostream/">flickr</a>

New Hampshire delegates at the Republican National Convention in Florida say Vice Presidential nominee Paul Ryan's plan to overhaul Medicare is an asset.

If there was ever any question whether Congressman Paul Ryan is beloved by the Republican base, doubts were put to rest last evening.

New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen and other Democrats are trying to Increase pressure on the House to pass an extension to the Violence Against Women Act before they head out of town in August.

Former New Hampshire Senator Judd Gregg was back in Washington Tuesday. The Republican is trying to pressure political leaders to put aside their differences and address the nation’s debt problem.

The Supreme Court’s decision on the health care law threw many lawmakers in Washington for a loop.

Guinta Touts GOP Budget

Mar 20, 2012

Second District Congressman Frank Guinta is helping champion House Republican’s new budget blueprint that Democrats say is dangerous for the nation’s poor and vulnerable. 
Both sides agree the new G-O-P budget paints a stark ideological contrast ahead of November’s elections. Inside Budget Chairman Paul Ryan’s new spending blueprint are cuts to Pell Grants, Medicaid, food stamps and an overhaul of welfare. The legislation also continues the G-O-P push to turn Medicare into what amounts to a voucher program, which is unpopular with many voters.

Thursday New Hampshire’s senators voted along party lines as the Senate rejected an amendment to unwind a controversial new contraceptive rule from the Obama Administration. 

Instead of requiring religious institutions to provide birth control in their health care plans, the White House pivoted and is now forcing insurance companies to provide contraception free of charge. Missouri Senator Roy Blunt’s amendment would have allowed employers to decide their own coverage based upon their religious beliefs. Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte supported the amendment.

In a rare bipartisan vote every member of the New Hampshire Congressional delegation voted to extend a payroll tax holiday for millions of average workers.

The payroll bill wasn’t released publicly until last night and many members studied it until late in the evening. 

The bill puts around one thousand dollars into the pockets of average workers.

Many Republicans didn’t like that the tax cut wasn’t paid for and comes from money that’s intended for the Social Security Trust Fund.

Congress broke a record this year, but hitting the lowest approval rating of all time isn’t what the region’s lawmakers had hoped to accomplish.

Correspondent Matt Laslo talked with the New Hampshire congressional delegation and has a look back at this year’s wild ride in Washington.

Republicans took over the lower chamber at the start of the year…hoping to drastically slash the federal debt. But it now sits at more than $15 trillion dollars.

New Hampshire’s senators split their votes over the president’s nominee to head the nation’s new bureau to protect consumers from financial fraud. 

Ohio Attorney General Richard Cordray didn’t stand a chance and it’s not because he’s controversial. Republicans just don’t like the consumer bureau the president asked him to head. The new bureau is housed in the Federal Reserve and paid for with its funds. Without the need to ask for money annually Republicans, such as New Hampshire’s Kelly Ayotte, say lawmakers lack essential oversight powers. 

New Hampshire lawmakers are trying to pressure the so-called “supercommittee” to exceed its goal of cutting $1.2 trillion  from the debt, but the special panel remains grid locked as it nears its end date.  If the supercommittee fails to reach a bipartisan solution by next Wednesday, deep spending cuts are supposed to fall on nearly the entire federal budget.

Some lawmakers want to scrap that agreement to protect the Pentagon’s budget and other favorite spending items.

 New Hampshire’s U-S senators helped defeat a measure to unwind new regulations to clean up air in the Granite State.

The Environmental Protection Agency is trying to prevent unhealthy smog and soot from coal fired power plants in 27 states from spreading to other states. The EPA’s cross-border pollution rule would force those states to drastically cut their emissions.

But tea party backed Kentucky freshman Rand Paul forced the Senate to vote on unwinding those new rules to protect his coal rich home state.

With power still out from last weekend’s snow storm, New Hampshire’s senators are pressuring federal regulators for answers.

New Hampshire’s senators are asking the federal agencies that oversee electrical grids to identify why the power keeps going out.

More than three hundred thousand people in New Hampshire were left in the dark and cold after the storm Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte says that’s unacceptable.

“With the ice storm there was a pretty lengthy outage and with this storm there was an outage and we want to make sure the grid is where it should be.”

The congressional “super committee” is only tasked with cutting one point two trillion dollars from the federal debt. But Second District Republican Congressman Charlie Bass is asking the panel to cut even deeper, even if it taxes are thrown into the mix.