Natasha Haverty

Politics and Policy Reporter, State of Democracy

Natasha Haverty is a reporter for NHPR's State of Democracy. Her investigative reporting has been awarded twice by the Society of Professional Journalists, as well as PRNDI, Murrow, and the AP. Her work has appeared in various media outlets, including NPR’s Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and The New York Times. Before coming to NHPR she worked at North Country Public Radio where she co-produced The Prison Time Media Project, a national series exploring the legacy of mass incarceration. 

Tasha got her start at The Moth, where she helped launch the Peabody Award-winning Moth Radio Hour.

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Kate Brindley for NHPR

Marco Rubio took the stage at the Manchester Radisson just as Donald Trump finished his victory speech. The crowd that came to see Rubio  was much smaller than those he’d been drawing at town halls the past few days—journalists far outnumbered the disappointed faces tonight, and Rubio addressed exactly why.

"I want you to understand something. Our disappointment tonight is not on you. It’s on me. It’s on me I did not do well on Saturday night so listen. that will never happen again."

Florida Senator Marco Rubio spoke to voters in Nashua just a few miles from where started his campaign in the state ten months ago. The main idea he offered to folks in this gymnasium: He’s the one candidate who can bring the Republican Party together. 


Kate Brindley for NHPR

  Republican senator Marco Rubio spent Sunday campaigning around the state—from a pancake breakfast in Londonderry to a Super Bowl watch party in Manchester. His stops came a day after Saturday’s GOP debate where other candidates challenged Rubio’s readiness for the job. 


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Marco Rubio got hit hard in Saturday's GOP debate, when Chris Christie accused the Florida senator of sticking to the same rehearsed lines over and over again. And for those few minutes, Rubio seemed unable to break script in the face of the attack.

To be fair, Rubio is certainly a candidate who's loyal to his stump speech. On his visits around New Hampshire, Rubio has essentially stuck to a trusty formula at town halls and rallies. So let's look at speech, and Rubio's classic talking points. Scroll through to read a brief breakdown, and listen to clips.

Before last night’s GOP debate got underway the lawn of St. Anselm college filled with Republican supporters. They had signs and chants—but also mixed in the crowd of 500 or so people were protesters pushing for a $15 federal minimum wage. NHPR’s Natasha Haverty went into the crowd and captured these voices. 

    

Latino voters are expected to turn out in record numbers across the country this election year. For many, learning the basics of how to vote is the first step.


GOP Presidential hopeful Marco Rubio’s pretty much stuck to the same stump speech for months— a focus on America’s God given rights, the threats posed by ISIS, and, a promise to repeal all of President Obama’s executive actions.

He makes the case that he’s the most electable Republican running, referencing Hillary Clinton through the whole speech.

But since Iowa, Rubio’s added one more character to his speech, a guy whose photo made it into the gallery up on the wall here in the large conference room here at St. Anselm: Bernie Sanders.

The Four Aces Diner on Lebanon's Bridge Street is a real old fashioned diner car: leather booths and linoleum counter, a blackboard of specials. But on this particular morning, the folks inside— not so up for talking politics.

Richard Taylor and his wife Susan linger in the stands of a hockey rink in Bow at about 9 o'clock in the morning. Marco Rubio’s just finished a town hall. Like most of the people I come across at Rubio's campaign stops, Taylor says he’s weighing Rubio against another candidate—in most cases that’s Ted Cruz.

Natasha Haverty

Florida Senator and Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio kicked off the final stretch in New Hampshire with a rally in Exeter last night. 


Natasha Haverty / NHPR

Primary elections have a tendency to push candidates to the political extreme—fire up the base and draw bright lines around the issues. But during the New Hampshire presidential primary, where political independents play a central role those tactics often mean the campaign rhetoric sometimes doesn’t line up with how voters actually think.

Here are a few voters feeling that disconnect on one issue: guns.


Natasha Haverty

 With less than three weeks to go before the state’s presidential primary, a new poll from UNH shows Bernie Sanders leading with nearly twice as much support as rival Hillary Clinton. Today, former President Bill Clinton showed up to make his case for why that should change. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Every ten years, with new census data, the New Hampshire legislature redraws the political map. It’s the party in power that gets to hold the pen. But Tuesday, a bill was introduced in the House proposing the state set up an independent redistricting commission.

Natasha Haverty

Just hours after stepping off stage from Thursday night’s Republican debate, Florida Senator and presidential hopeful Marco Rubio was back in New Hampshire Friday. 

At a stop at New England College in Henniker, he repeated a line he uses a lot on the campaign trail: 


Natasha Haverty

In the 2016 presidential campaign, few issues have been as fiercely debated as immigration. Here in New Hampshire, the US Southern border thousands of miles away can feel like an abstraction. But a small and growing number of voters in New Hampshire take the immigration debate very personally: the state’s Latino community. And as that community grows, so does its resolve to find a political voice. 

Allegra Boverman

For the first time in its 100 year history, Planned Parenthood has endorsed a candidate in a presidential primary: former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Clinton officially accepted the endorsement yesterday afternoon in Manchester. NHPR’s Natasha Haverty reports.


Allegra Boverman / NHPR

New Hampshire’s primary is just five weeks away, and state election officials are anticipating record turnout. There’s something else on their minds too—this will be the first presidential primary with the state’s new voter ID law in place. 

The law, which passed three and a half years ago, was part of a wave of stricter voter laws pushed by Republicans across the country. How it plays out on Primary Day is still an open question.

 


Photo by Jackie Finn-Irwin via Flickr Creative Commons

Men and women incarcerated at New Hampshire state prisons won’t be getting Christmas cards this year.

That’s because of a new mail policy the Department of Corrections implemented. Some call it the harshest mail policy of any prison system in the US. Now one New Hampshire boy and his grandmother, with the help of the ACLU, are suing the state’s Department of Corrections. 

(From El Rincon Colombiano's Yelp page)

 

Step into the Rincon Colombiano on a Saturday night, and you’ll probably have trouble finding a seat. There’s just a few tables, a long counter—tonight, all full. And in back, Owner Beatriz Delacruz and her two daughters barely have room to move in this tiny kitchen.

There’s lots of different dishes coming out this swinging door. I came for the empanadas.

Natasha Haverty

Last night Presidential Candidate Donald Trump came to Portsmouth for a few minutes, to pick up an endorsement from the New England’s police union. 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Tonight Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is scheduled to campaign in Portsmouth. The visit comes in the wake of his call for a “total and and complete shutdown” of Muslims entering the United States.

Trump will start the evening meeting with the New England Police Benevolent Association. This is his first campaign stop in the state since his proposal to bar Muslims from the country.

Natasha Haverty for NHPR

On Sunday, New Hampshire’s Democratic Party hosted its annual Jefferson Jackson dinner. All three Democratic presidential candidates spoke to the sold out crowd in Manchester’s Radisson Ballroom. Hillary Clinton closed out the night. More so than Sanders or O’Malley, her speech called on time spent here in the Granite State. 

At Sunday night's Jefferson Jackson dinner, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders took a moment on the stage to express his opposition to the Northeast Energy Direct—the controversial natural gas pipeline proposed by Kinder Morgan.

"I opposed the Keystone Pipeline from day one," Sanders said. "And that is why, here in New Hampshire, I believe the Northeast Energy Direct pipeline, that would direct fracked natural gas for four hundred miles, through seventeen communities, is a bad idea, and should be opposed."

portraits of Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson
Rembrandt Peale, courtesy White House Historical Association/Thomas Sully, courtesy US Senate

 This Sunday New Hampshire’s Democratic Party hosts its annual Jefferson Jackson dinner. 

Presidential candidates Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and Martin O’Malley will all be there Sunday, joining Governor Hassan and Senator Shaheen at Manchester’s Radisson Ballroom. The event is sold out.

The towns in New Hampshire's White Mountains region have been must-stops on the campaign schedules of presidential candidates for decades. The region's sweeping views, quaint villages and history of resilience make it the ideal backdrop for those auditioning for the Oval Office. But what’s in it for the voters? And how engaged are they, away from the campaign stops and photo ops? NHPR's Natasha Haverty wanted to find out.

Natasha Haverty / NHPR

For those of us who have been around a few election cycles, this year stands out from the others—outsiders favored over career politicians, new campaign finance rules and super PACs, an unwieldy candidate line up. But for first time voters—18 year olds—it’s all new. NHPR’s Natasha Haverty visited a civics class at Kennett High School in Conway, to hear from some of them.

Natasha Haverty

It’s on every presidential candidate’s checklist: make at least one swing through northern New Hampshire, deliver a stump speech, shake hands with residents of the quiet mountain towns. But what about the people who aren’t at those campaign events? 

Republican presidential candidate John Kasich was in Manchester Friday holding another town hall. This one was aimed at local business owners, with a plan for how he would balance the country’s budget. But the conversation veered into some unexpected territory.

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