NHPR Staff

There’s a band of bedrock in Eastern New England that makes the region one of about a dozen hotspots in the country for arsenic in drinking wells.

A U.S. Geological Survey study estimates nearly 50,000 people in Southeastern New Hampshire could be drinking elevated levels of arsenic.

And while it can sound terrifying that there are trace amounts of such an iconic poison in some people’s water, it can be fixed.

Northern Pass is a highly controversial proposal to run 180 miles of new power lines from Canada through New Hampshire.

While it's a high-profile debate in the state, many New Hampshire residents are unsure of how Northern Pass compares to past energy projects, what both sides have at stake, and what the future of the region's energy supply could look like.

In this three-part series Sam Evans-Brown examines Northern Pass through these lenses, and in doing so, brings some new issues to light.

Sheryl Rich-Kern for NHPR

Scroll down for weather information, links to closings and our regional map. We've also embedded some of your tweets below and will be adding photos from around the state to the gallery above.

Have a photo you'd like us to share? Email it our way. Just make sure to include your name and town.

5:02 p.m. 

A winter storm warning remains in effect until midnight. New Hampshire can expect total snow accumulation of 10 to 15 inches for southern sections, 6 to 10 inches for the Merrimack Valley and central New Hampshire, with lesser amounts in the North Country. 

Tomorrow, we'll see morning clouds, with partly sunny skies later in the day. It will be clear and cold on Wednesday, with more snow possible for Thursday.

4:45 p.m. - Some Businesses Seeing Snow-Related Uptick 

by Sheryl Rich-Kern

This week’s steady pounding of snow prevents some consumers from patronizing shops and restaurants. But for those running an outdoor equipment shop, business can’t get any better. 

Whether or not the current snowfall tops any records, many in the Nashua region can’t remember a barrage like this one. The slow but steady storm that began Sunday is dumping another foot of snow.

At Nashua Outdoor Power Equipment, business has been very brisk. Fred Hayden has been selling and repairing snowblowers since 1991.

"We’re a little overwhelmed. We haven’t see snow like this – ever - in the history of our business.  We’ve done as much volume in ten days as we do in one-third of the year. We’ve been here Sundays. We’ve been out here until eleven at night doing road calls."

Hayden says the light, fluffy snow freezes up carburetors, recoils, and starters on tractors. He recommends using high-octane gasoline that’s less than ninety days old — and adding a fuel stabilizer. 

11:42 a.m.

9:11 a.m.

Department of Transportation spokesman Bill Boynton says it’s been a grueling last two weeks, and this latest prolonged storm is testing the endurance of crews working to clear the roads.

“We’ve got some crews that have not been home since late Saturday night around midnight,” he said. “They’re taking breaks along the way, but there really haven’t been too many lulls that have allowed them to take extensive periods off. So the work continues and will throughout most of the day.”

Even though there are close to 700 trucks out, Boynton says drivers should expect snow-covered roads through most of the day.

8:50 a.m.

National Weather Service radar from Portland, Maine shows the stalled front, which is expected to cause prolonged snowfall across New Hampshire well into Monday night.

7:28 a.m.

Officials in Nashua are urging people and business owners to clear snow off their roofs, after a roof partially collapsed at a vacant commercial building Sunday night.

The city’s emergency management director Justin Kates says no one was hurt in the incident.

“But it really does show some of the concerns we’re looking at over the next couple of days as these constantly increasing snow packs on roofs continue to build up,” he said. “If people don’t take care of that by sending crews up or using a roof rake, we could be seeing some catastrophic consequences with roofs collapse.”

This comes just after heavy snow caused the roof an apartment building in the city to partially collapse last week, displacing two dozen residents.

Kates says the city has cleared snow off of several public buildings.

He says the city continues to work to clear snow that has fallen over several major winter storms over the past few weeks.

  6:56 a.m., Monday

A prolonged winter storm is bearing down on the Granite State.

Rob Carolan with Hometown Forecast says the storm that began Saturday night is expected to continue through tonight.

“Most of the state has picked up, at least south of the Lakes Region, around 1-3 inches of snow," he said. "We’ll probably pick up 2-4 inches today into tonight.”

A winter storm warning remains in effect for almost the entire state except for northern Coos county through midnight tonight.

Carolan says total accumulation for the southern part of the state will be tween 8 to 14 inches.

Only a few inches are expected north of the Lakes Regions into the White Mountains.

Speed limits on the state’s major highways have been lowered 45 miles per hour. 

Sunday night

A stalled front will continue to produce sustained snowfall across New Hampshire through Monday night. According to the National Weather service, waves of low pressure will allow for period of snow across the region.

While the snow at any given time will not be particularly intense, it will add up over the course of the storm, with some areas seeing well over a foot. The heaviest snowfall is expected across southern parts of the state. 

Have you taken an impressive snow photo you'd like us to share? Email it our way, and make sure to include your name and town.

Credit New Hampshire State Police


Nearly 20 New Hampshire police cruisers have been struck by other vehicles since Thanksgiving, prompting law enforcement, fire and emergency officials to warn drivers to slow down, move over and be more careful.

Col. Robert Quinn with the state police says the 19 crashes are three times the average for the winter season.

NHPR Staff


The New Hampshire Legislature is revisiting the issue of ballot selfies.

The House Election Law Committee is hearing a bill Tuesday that would repeal a measure passed last year that bans taking a digital photograph of a marked ballot and sharing it via social media or other means.

Representative J.R. Hoell is the bill’s prime sponsor, and says it’s a First Amendment issue.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Power outage maps and info: PSNH (Eversource Energy) | Unitil | National Grid/Liberty | NH Electric Co-op

School and other emergency closings from WMUR

511NH real time traffic/road closure information

Can you safely take a storm photo? , and make sure to tell us the town in which it was taken. Email it our way!

8:13 a.m. Wednesday: Nashua, Durham Work to Get Back to Normal

  Cleanup is underway across New Hampshire today, after yesterday’s blizzard.

We check in with two communities hit hardest by the storm: Nashua and Durham.

Let’s start with Nashua, which saw 33 inches of snow.

Justin Kates is the city’s director of emergency management.

How are things looking this morning?

I think we’ve made significant improvements. We’ve had crews out all night. We had crews out all day yesterday. These plow drivers have really been working nonstop to clear those roads as much as possible. We’re seeing some really good improvements today.

Do you feel confident that roads are clear enough that people can get out and about this morning?

I do. I think the big concern for folks is they’re going to want to give themselves some extra time this morning to ensure their driveways are clear. Those roads are still a little icy, so it’s still important for people to drive safe if they have to go out this morning.

What about parking on city streets?

At 10 a.m. this morning, parking will be allowed on city streets as well as those municipal surface lots.

What about other concerns besides roadways? Have there been any other lingering issues from the storm?

Thankfully with this storm, we didn’t have any power outages, which certainly brings a concern to the emergency management office. We didn’t have to open up any shelters and for the most part, it was just a significant snow event that really impacted our public works department. Thankfully, there weren’t really any other concerns other than keeping those streets clear.

Speaking of your public works department, how about the budget? We’ve got many more storms on the horizon and it’s only the end of January.

One of the things I think we do pretty well in the city is to plan for these kinds of events. There’s a snow budget already in place here in the city as well as a trust fund in the event that we have one of those significant winters like we’ve had in the past. I think we’re ready to go if we see continue to see more snow like this throughout the winter.

Durham Town Administrator Todd Selig also joined Morning Edition.

What are you seeing in Durham today?

We had quite a storm yesterday. We took measurements yesterday evening and parts of Durham had up to 28 inches of snow.

How’s it looking for snow removal?

It’s been hard sledding, to be honest with you. A storm like this requires that our snow fighters in the public works department sometimes go for as long as 24 hours with only short breaks for meals and naps. At this time, we have more or less had to send all of our staff home to rest because they had been going more than a day without stopping.

We have all of our main roads cleared. We have most of the sidewalks in the downtown cleared. But all of the sidewalks extending into our ancillary neighborhoods, around the downtown into some of the more distant parts of the community will have to wait for about another day so we can muster the resources to clear those out.

Looking ahead, there are some other storms on the horizon. How’s the town budget?

The town budget is good. We begin our fiscal year Jan. 1, so we’ve really just begun with a new fiscal year. I have to say we were running on fumes until Dec. 31, but we’re recharged now with a new fiscal year. That’s good news, but storms like this are costly. In salt alone, Durham went through about $10,000 in this storm. And the total cost of cleanup is going to be somewhere between $25,000 and $35,000. I’m betting around $35,000, toward the high end.

When do you feel like you’ll be back to normal in Durham?

It’s hard because clearing the roads is just the first step. In the downtown in particular, we have very large snow piles and we need to bring in special loaders and dump trucks in order to cart all of that snow away. To make matters worse, we have more snow coming in this weekend, with more than a foot or more expected next Monday.

  6:16 a.m. Wednesday: Cleaning up the Mess

New Hampshire is digging out from a strong winter storm that dumped more than two feet of snow in some places.

Gov. Maggie Hassan said government will reopen Wednesday after shutting down when the storm blew through on Tuesday. Some schools will remain closed for a second day and strong winds into Tuesday night meant snow drifts were likely to pop up on some roads.

Snowfall totals ranged from a few inches north of the White Mountains to more than 3 feet along the coast. Wind speeds of 30 to 35 mph and gusts up to 50 mph blew drifts that reached rooflines in some places.

Wednesday is expected to be cold and dry but more snow could reach the state starting Thursday night.

5:10 p.m. Tuesday: Overview of the Storm

A major winter storm blanketed New Hampshire Tuesday, but ample warning, a declared state of emergency and what Gov. Maggie Hassan called good old Granite State common sense kept problems to a minimum. Here's an overview of the storm so far, via The Associated Press:

File photo/NHPR

Attorney General Joseph Foster says police were responding to a call from a woman just after 8 a.m. who said her husband had just left their home distraught, suicidal and armed with a shotgun. 

Police located his truck at a nearby intersection and the officer approached. 

The officer returned fire and the man suffered a single, fatal gunshot wound to the head. 

Authorities are withholding the names of those involved at this time. They say the officer involved did not sustain any serious injuries. 

An autopsy is scheduled for Thursday.

The following are links to seven stories Sam reported in 2014, submitted for the Education Writers Association National Awards for Education Reporting.

In-depth series:

A two-part series about New Hampshire's Virtual Learning Academy Charter School, a statewide online charter school:  

The Data Is Tricky To Parse, But Online Charter VLACS Seems To Work For Students

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Today, Governor Maggie Hassan begins her second term facing a far different political landscape than she faced two years ago. Scroll down for real-time updates from the Statehouse featuring news, tweets from NHPR reporters and photos by Allegra Boverman. Click through additional photos in the gallery above.

Visit the official inaugural committee website here. 

Officials in Berlin voted Monday night to approve the police department’s application to purchase a $275,000 BearCat armored vehicle.

The vote by the city council came with some provisions, such as ensuring the vehicle won’t have gun ports or the ability to shoot tear gas.

City officials also created a five-person advisory council to establish regulations on how the vehicle should be used and reporting requirements on when it’s used in the field.

The purchase of such armored vehicles has been a controversial issue in several New Hampshire communities.

Interstate 93 has reopened following this morning's massive car pileups near Ashland.

Authorities had asked drivers to use the detour at Exit 22 northbound to avoid the area near exits 24 and 25, where state police say about 35 cars were involved in this morning’s accidents. At least one of the vehicles caught fire.  

State emergency management officials say there were no serious injuries.

NHPR's State of Democracy is a multi-platform enterprise journalism unit that focuses on the impact of politics and public policy on the lives of the people of New Hampshire and beyond. 

State of Democracy has three goals: 

1. To report on the forces that shape, inform and influence politics and public policy choices in New Hampshire.  

2. To explore the impacts that political decisions have on the day-to-day lives of a broad range of Americans. 

3. To follow New Hampshire’s federal, state, and local politicians to raise awareness, increase accountability and elevate civic discourse and participation.


Meet the Team:


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NH Attorney General


Superior Courts in Coos and Carroll County have released hundreds of new charges against a North Country man accused of kidnapping a 14-year-old North Conway girl last year.

Nathaniel Kibby, 34, of Gorham faces 205 charges, alleging the brutal treatment of an unnamed female victim.

At a press conference Wednesday, Assistant Attorney General Jane Young went through the indictments, which include 160 counts of sexual assault.

NH Attorney General

Superior Courts in Coos and Carroll County have released hundreds of new charges against a North Country man accused of kidnapping a 14-year-old North Conway girl last year.

Nathaniel Kibby, 34, of Gorham faces 205 charges, alleging the brutal treatment of an unnamed female victim.

At a press conference Wednesday, Assistant Attorney General Jane Young went through the indictments, which include 160 counts of sexual assault.

Ella Nilsen / NHPR

A tumultuous year for Market Basket is coming to an end with Arthur T. Demoulas formally in charge of the company.

Demoulas and his family announced Friday that they have completed the purchase of the 50.5 percent of the company that was controlled by his cousin. Demoulas offered $1.6 billion in the buyout proposal in August.

Other details of the deal weren't disclosed.

The nearly century-old supermarket chain based in Tewksbury, Massachusetts, has 73 stores in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine.

NHPR Staff

For the latest weather information and power outage maps, visit NHPR's weather information page right here.

Tune in to NHPR for weather information throughout the day.

  8:06 AM

The winter weather has led to a number of power outages for New Hampshire Electric Cooperative customers.

The utility’s spokesman Seth Wheeler says the outages peaked around 6 yesterday evening, with 5,600 customers out.

Jack Rodolico

Update: 10:23 AM Saturday

The number of New Hampshire customers without power after the season's first major snowstorm is down to about 40,000.

At the peak, more than 200,000 homes and businesses were without electricity after the storm Wednesday night, the fourth largest outage in state history.

Public Service of New Hampshire reported about 39,000 homes and business without power Saturday morning, mostly in the southern part of the state. It expects to have electricity fully restored by Monday.

When severe weather knocks out power to tens of thousands of homes and businesses, utility crews work around the clock to restore service. But somebody is always going to be the last one to get plugged back in...and it could be you.

If you’re already waiting around for the power to come back on, it’s too late to do prep like charging batteries or buying a generator. But there are some things you can do right now to protect your home and family…and maybe even reclaim some creature comforts.

Len Medlock via Flickr CC

When it comes down to it, Thanksgiving is really about one thing:  the turkey.  Especially here in New England. 

When The New York Times put out its map of the Thanksgiving foods represented each state, New Hampshire was awarded the crown prize, the New England Roast Turkey. 

So on this Thanksgiving, we thought we’d bring you some stories all about turkeys—from a restaurant that serves turkey dinners every day to a lawyer raising the bird to a soup kitchen making sure no one goes without the main dish this year.

Every day is Thanksgiving at Hart's Turkey Farm in Meredith

by Sean Hurley

"All the time."

That's Sam Willey. His grandparents opened Hart's in 1954. Willey himself has bussed and waited tables, prepared food, bakes pies. 

"I started when I was 7 years old.  Pick up the parking lot was my first duty."

Now Willey's one of the owners.  How does a restaurant that serves Thanksgiving dinners year round top itself on the big day?

"We actually do everything the same," he says.

But just a lot more of it. Mike Cornellison is the executive chef.  On a good day 500 hot plates will emerge from his kitchen.  On Thankgiving, he's expecting to serve well over 1000.

"The hardest part of my day is making sure everything gets up and is hot and fresh cause we are a scratch kitchen here so we make everything from scratch. Today, out back right now I think there's 36 people back there."

Making rolls, thickening gravy, prepping turkey...or like baker Sherry Agengo, making lots and lots of pies.

"I'm making peach cobbler," Agengo says, "Today, I made over a hundred."

In the busy gift shop out front, the phone doesn't stop ringing. Orders for cranberry sauce, stuffing, for the biggest turkey they have.

"We actually get a lot of calls, why we don't mail gravy?  Maybe one day we'll be there, but I'm not ready for that," Willey says, laughing.

There's nothing in the world that can prepare you for mailing gravy, but if anyone can figure it out it'll be someone from a land where Thanksgiving never ends. 

Concord Resident via Facebook

For weather information in your area, including utility outage maps, visit NHPR's weather information page right here. 

Tens of thousands of New Hampshire residents woke up on Thanksgiving morning without power.

Public Service of New Hampshire, the state’s largest electricity provider, reported 168,000 of its customers were in the dark this morning.

Unitil is reporting about 18,000 customers are without power.

PSNH spokeswoman Lauren Collins says the company says the southern and central-eastern portions of the state were hit hardest.

  “So Hillsborough, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford counties have the most concentrated outages. There are outages as you head the western part of the state, the southwestern part. And as you head to the lakes region, there are also some scattered outages.”

Collins says the major problem has been heavy, wet snow bringing down large trees.

She says crews have been working through the night, and will continue to work throughout the Thanksgiving holiday.

“At this time, we have 138 PSNH workers, 100 additional contractors our there. They’ve been working pretty much nonstop to make sure that somebody gets a warm turkey today.”

Additional crews are expected today from across New England and Canada to provide support.

Still, Collins says customers should expect this process take some time.

“We are telling people to be prepared for a multi-day restoration effort. That doesn’t mean everyone will be without power for several days, but we want them to be prepared and stay safe. Have necessaries on hand; flashlights, batteries, etc.”

New Hampshire Electric Co-op Making Progress, Asks for Patience

Dena DeLucca, vice president with New Hampshire Electric Cooperative, says roughly 15,000 customers are without power this morning.

That’s down from a peak of about 22,000 customers overnight.

DeLucca says there are still a number of power lines, and asks customers to have patience as crews work throughout the Thanksgiving holiday.

“What happens with this heavy snow it brings down trees and tree limbs that take down the wire. It’s a fairly extensive job to put that back, once they get the road cleared.” 

She says 20 line crews and 25 crews are out working this morning to repair the damage.

The company hopes to have power restored to all customers by 10 this evening.

Hello CAB Members!  Thank you for taking the time to complete the following assignment. Please listen to the three pieces of audio posted below, and then complete the quick survey below.

Please complete the survey by Thursday, November 13th, so that we can compile the results before Saturday's meeting. And thank you!

Segment 1:

A pre-election NHPR News feature by Seacoast Reporter Emily Corwin. In this story, she looks at the significance of the Portsmouth Shipyard in New Hampshire politics.

Segment 2:

Tracy Lee Carroll, NHPR

Here are some of the important facts about today's election in New Hampshire. You can also read NHPR's reporting on the candidates and find all of our election coverage and resources right here. 


U.S. Senate: Incumbent Democrat Jeanne Shaheen is vying for a second term. She's up against Scott Brown, the former U.S. Senator from Massachusetts who is trying to become just the third person to represent two states in the Senate.


Political Junkie Ken Rudin never left public radio. His weekly podcast has your dose of political analysis. And in time for the midterms this year, he's put together a special program for radio audiences as well. Before you dig in to this program, remember that he'll be live in studio with us on 4 November for our election night coverage as we track returns around the state.

Tune in to NHPR for a series of debates with the candidates for senator, governor and New Hampshire’s two congressional seats. They will will air live at 7 P.M. beginning Monday, October 20. The full schedule is posted below.

The NH1 debates are produced in partnership with NHPR, The Portsmouth Herald, The Laconia Sun and Foster's Daily Democrat. 

To learn more about the candidates, click here. To listen to NHPR's Rudman Center Conversations with the Candidates, click here.

David J. Murray, cleareyephoto.com

On The Media's Brooke Gladstone talked with Word of Mouth host Virginia Prescott at UNH Durham, September 10, 2014.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

Join Laura Knoy for an in-depth discussion with the candidates about the issues on New Hampshire voters’ minds this election season. Each forum will be broadcast the following day during The Exchange at 9 am on the stations of NHPR.

All events begin at 5:30pm
Reception to follow

Where: UNH School of Law, 2 White Street, Concord, NH

Audience questions will be encouraged. Tickets are complimentary, reservations are required and space is limited. See below for dates & registration links.

Taylor Quimby / NHPR

Candidates for the U.S. Senate, governor, Congress and the state legislature are on the New Hampshire primary ballot Tuesday. Click through our Primary 2014 gallery above to see the day unfold in photos taken by NHPR reporters, the campaigns, and New Hampshire voters.

A screen cap of Unitil's outage map

About 10,000 customers around the Concord area were without power for several hours Monday evening.

The city's main utility, Unitil, did not immediately provide a reason for the outage that hit shortly after 5 p.m. Monday, but later posted updates on their Twitter feed which indicated the blackout was caused by a pole fire that occurred at a substation. 

Power was restored to all Capital Region customers shortly after 8 PM.