Peter Biello

Host, All Things Considered

Peter Biello is the host of All Things Considered at New Hampshire Public Radio. He has served as a producer and host of Weekend Edition Saturday at Vermont Public Radio and as a reporter/host of Morning Edition at WHQR in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Peter has won several AP awards for his journalism, which has appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered and This American Life. He’s also a fiction writer whose work appears or is forthcoming in Gargoyle, Lowestoft Chronicle, Green Writers Press, and South85 Journal. He’s also the founder of Burlington Writers Workshop, a nonprofit writing workshop based in Burlington, Vermont, and co-founder of Mud Season Review, a literary journal featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art that publishes in print annually and online monthly.

Peter lives in Concord, New Hampshire. 

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On Tuesday, public health officials confirmed the first cases of overdose deaths from carfentanil in New Hampshire. Carfentanil is a synthetic opiod and much more potent than the painkiller fentanyl. It can be mixed with heroin with deadly results. It can also be absorbed through the skin or accidentally inhaled, posing a risk to first responders and health workers. 

Peter Biello / NHPR

Robert Azzi is an Arab-American Muslim who wants you to ask him anything about his faith. The Exeter-based photojournalist has put together a program called “Ask a Muslim Anything” that he hopes will help reduce misunderstandings between people of different faiths. 

fellowdesigns / Morguefile

In the early 1990s, a group of engineers, architects, planners and designers attempted to figure out what it would take for electric vehicles to thrive in Keene. And their ideas came pretty close to what emerged in other locations across the country more than two decades later.

Courtesy Easterseals NH

Easterseals New Hampshire was trying to fill 280 open positions in Manchester to serve children with physical, neurological or behavioral disabilities. To fill those open positions, Easterseals had to get creative.

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

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  The New Hampshire Division for Children, Youth and Families is now looking for a new leader. That person would take the helm of a department beset by overburdened child protection workers and a lack of resources. Reporter Allie Morris of The Concord Monitor has written a multi-part series on DCYF, drawing on documents and interviews with current and former employees, Governor Chris Sununu, and people who have been the subject of DYCF cases, as well as information gathered through Right to Know requests.

A state nonprofit organization is making it easier for people like you to share your thoughts on bills at the State House. Citizens Count, Live Free or Die Alliance has launched what it’s calling the “Citizen Voices” campaign, which creates online discussions of issues and then summarizes those discussions in testimony before the legislature. Joining me now to talk about Citizen Voices is Jacqueline Benson, the editor of the nonprofit and manager of “Citizen Voices.” She spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

Peter Biello / NHPR

The New Hampshire House is scheduled to vote tomorrow on its proposed state budget.

The $11.9 billion budget has opponents on both sides of the aisle, and it’s unclear whether it'll get enough support this week.

The state of New Hampshire is as much an idea as it is a place. New Hampshire represents the idea of living simply, close to nature, and, of course, freely. In the early 1930s, the state began marketing itself as a kind of Yankee paradise with a magazine called The New Hampshire Troubadour. This magazine, long out of print, may be responsible for the way people outside New Hampshire think about it.

When I was in high school, I had a chemistry teacher who liked to blow things up. Mix a little of this chemical with that chemical, light a match, and then—bam! Smoke, flames, and a whole room of teenagers saying, “Wow, cool! How did that happen?”

The shock of the explosion—even a small explosion—was enough to compel a group of teenagers to pay attention to a lesson about, for example, formulas and atomic weight.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Officials in Nashua say homelessness among military veterans in the greater Nashua area has been effectively ended.

Nashua Mayor Jim Donchess joined Senator Maggie Hassan and other officials in making the announcement Friday in Nashua at Harbor Homes, a non-profit that has been central to the efforts of several organizations in the region working to end homelessness.

Peter Biello / NHPR

During America’s Revolutionary War, a woman named Deborah Sampson disguised herself as a man in order to serve in the Continental Army. She served 17 months before being wounded and honorably discharged. Today she has become a symbol of the bravery women have shown in service to our country, and she’s now the namesake of the Deborah Sampson Act, which is legislation designed to addresses gender disparities at VA hospitals. New Hampshire democratic Senator Maggie Hassan co-introduced the legislation. She spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

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Over the past few decades, birth rates across the world have been falling. Retirees are growing in number while the number of young working people is relatively flat. And that’s a problem if you need those workers to in some ways help pay for the rising cost of aging.

Nathaniel Boesch

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Paul Proshin / Unsplash

Nearly one in ten New Hampshire teens reported being the victim of physical dating violence during the past year, and more than one in ten New Hampshire teens reported being the victim of sexual dating violence during the past year.

Those are just some of the findings in a new report from the Carsey School of Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire. Assuistant Professor Katie Edwards is one of the authors of the study. She spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello.

Peter Biello / NHPR

It's a deceptively simple question: "Have you or a family member ever served in the military?" The state launched a program two years ago to get doctors, police officers, educators, and others to ask that question.

The aim was to identify people who qualify for veterans benefits. The results have been, for many people, surprising.

Shelby El Otmani / NHPR

Imagine if you could be transported to a different place and time. Where would you go? For Daniel Gaucher and his film crew, that place is Smuttynose Island, off the New Hampshire coast. And the time? 1873, the year of the infamous Smuttynose Island murders. And they want you to be there, too, through the power of virtual reality. But filmmakers have a lot to learn when it comes to using this technology. 

It’s a frigid winter day. The sky is a brilliant blue. It’s gusty, and the ocean looks choppy and cold. And in the distance, a lighthouse shines bright white on the rocky coast.

Scott Webb / Unsplash

The Nashua Board of Alderman is looking at a proposed ordinance that would give veterans in the city a $500 property tax credit. 

Under this ordinance, veterans who had served at least 90 days of active service would be eligible. A previous tax credit in the city was limited to veterans who served only in certain wars or conflicts. 

It's unclear how many veterans in Nashua would be eligible. The city estimates the credit would cost $670,000. Nashua Alderman Ben Clemmons says he supports the proposal. 

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The towns and cities on New Hampshire’s mostly white seacoast have mostly white police departments. The racial diversity among the police departments in the area differ by degrees, but several police chiefs agree that increasing the diversity of the police force is a goal worth pursuing.

Dover’s Police Chief Anthony Colarusso spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about efforts to create a more diverse police force.

This transcript has been edited for clarity. 

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An independent investigation revealed last week that there are more sex abuse allegations against former faculty and staff at Phillips Exeter Academy than previously thought. The allegations of sexually inappropriate behavior involved several students over a period that began in 1966.

Hadley Barndollar has been covering this story for the Portsmouth Herald. She joins NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about these new revelations.

Courtesy Kianny Antigua

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Courtesy of Debbie Delorey

Nearly five years ago, a veteran in New Hampshire’s North Country died while waiting for an appointment through the VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont. The hospital says “no significant delay” contributed to his death, but the man’s widow disagrees, and questions remain about the process the hospital used to hold itself accountable.

Future In Sight via Caitlin Drown

New Hampshire Association for the Blind announced today that it’s getting a new name. It will be called Future In Sight. The organization’s president and CEO David Morgan says the new name better represents how the organization addresses the needs of the community.

David Morgan spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss the change and how they plan to serve the community.

This transcript has been edited for clarity. 

Tell us, what need in the community is your organization addressing that warrants changing the organization’s name?

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The science fair has been a staple of science education for decades. But recently the loss of Intel, the computer chip giant, as a sponsor of the International Science and Engineering Fair is prompting some soul searching about the purpose of this educational mainstay. Do these science fairs, complete with a tri-fold poster board, really help students learn the kinds of things that prepare them for today’s science-based challenges?

Peter Biello / NHPR

Congresswoman Annie Kuster says the government hasn't been able to keep its promise to provide military veterans with their health care under all circumstances.

Speaking at a roundtable discussion in Berlin Friday, Kuster says the U.S. should keep that promise, but its not realistic to have Department of Veterans Affairs clinics in every location.

Her comments came in response to a complaint about the VA's closing of two part-time clinics in Berlin and Colebrook.

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  A bill at the New Hampshire State House would prohibit discrimination based on gender identity. Meanwhile, President Trump has rescinded protections for transgender students that had allowed them to use school bathrooms that correspond with their gender identities. 

While politicians debate, some transgender rights advocates push for equal rights. Among those advocates is fifteen year-old Emily Fishbaugh. She's transgender and she lives in North Hampton New Hampshire.

Omid Moghimi

Just a few weeks ago NHPR’s Peter Biello spoke with Dr. Omid Moghimi, whose wife was stuck in the final stages of applying for a green card when President Donald Trump issued his executive order banning travel from seven Muslim-majority nations.

Now that the ban has been suspended, Dorsa Razi has been able to come to the United States. It's a happy conclusion to an uncertain situation, and Omid is back on the program to talk about the experience.

This transcript has been edited for clarity. 

Peter Biello / NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu is asking the state's military veterans to present to legislators a clear vision of how to address the problems they face in New Hampshire.

At a meeting of the State Veterans Advisory Committee Tuesday night, Sununu said if veterans have an issue they'd like the legislature to address, they should write a short, clear statement for legislators to read.

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During winter’s dark months you may feel a little bit down. It’s common for people to feel sadder during the winter months, but that sadness isn’t always considered seasonal affective disorder, which is the official term for depression brought on by the cold winter days.

Concord Monitor reporter David Brooks is hosting Concord's Science Café all about seasonal affective disorder, and spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about the disorder and how it’s nothing like your typical case of “the winter blues”.

This transcript has been edited for clarity.
 

NHPR / Michael Brindley

Democratic Congresswoman Annie Kuster is calling on the Department of Veterans Affairs to scrap its current electronic health record system and adopt a commercial system.

Right now the VA uses a system called VistA, which the VA developed for itself. The VA has been trying for years to make it work seamlessly with the system used by the Department of Defense. That effort so far has failed. 

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