Peter Biello

Host, All Things Considered

Peter Biello is the host of All Things Considered at New Hampshire Public Radio. He has served as a producer and host of Weekend Edition Saturday at Vermont Public Radio and as a reporter/host of Morning Edition at WHQR in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Peter has won several AP awards for his journalism, which has appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered and This American Life. He’s also a fiction writer whose work appears or is forthcoming in Gargoyle, Lowestoft Chronicle, Green Writers Press, and South85 Journal. He’s also the founder of Burlington Writers Workshop, a nonprofit writing workshop based in Burlington, Vermont, and co-founder of Mud Season Review, a literary journal featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art that publishes in print annually and online monthly.

Peter lives in Concord, New Hampshire. 

Ways to Connect

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Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Peter Biello / NHPR

Library officials in Lebanon have agreed to resume support of Tor, an anonymous web browsing service.

The Kilton Public Library in Lebanon had set up in July what’s called a “relay node.” That’s one link in a chain of computers protects Tor users’ anonymity.

Library officials turned off the relay node after local police raised concerns about Tor’s role in facilitating the exchange of child pornography and drugs.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 Voters in Manchester go to the polls Tuesday for a primary election that will narrow down a field of five candidates for mayor that includes, most prominently, the three-term incumbent Ted Gatsas. Contributor and former city politics reporter for the Union Leader Ted Siefer spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

First of all, the current mayor, Ted Gatsas, is a well-known political figure in the state and won his past three elections by comfortable margins. Is he considered vulnerable this time around?

The first library in the country to become part of the anonymous web browsing service Tor has disconnected from that network, at least for now.

Officials at the Kilton Public Library in Lebanon were contacted by local law enforcement with concerns about Tor’s ability to conceal criminal activity. Library officials chose to disconnect from Tor pending further review.

None of the computers at the library had the Tor browser.

Peter Biello / NHPR

In the southwestern United States, the cost of harvesting chili peppers is rising, and competitors in Mexico have the advantage of cheaper labor. Enter Nag Kodali, an inventor from Pelham, New Hampshire. He’s invented a device that could help mechanize the chili harvesting process. 

At a machine shop in North Billerica, Massachusetts, Nag Kodali makes a few adjustments to his creation: a roughly twelve-foot long system of conveyor belts designed to gently remove pepper stems.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Officials in Franklin have voted to reinstate the city's curfew for children under the age of 16.

The curfew had been in effect for two decades but was recently suspended. Under the curfew, reinstated by vote of the city council, children would need to be out of public areas after 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and after 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday evenings. Parents of children caught violating the curfew could face fines.

Flickr user "btckeychain."

When you buy or sell a home, at some point in the process, you’ve got to check the property against a central database, usually at the town clerk’s office. And when you buy or sell something with the digital currency bitcoin, that bitcoin has to be registered somewhere so it can’t be spent twice. That registry, which functions kind of like a digital town clerk’s office, is called the block chain. Right now the state of Vermont is paving the way for entrepreneurs and governments to use the block chain for other purposes.

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

PunchingJudy via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/3WYLgF

 Lawmakers and Governor Maggie Hassan supported legislation this year to make Narcan more accessible so it can be used to save the lives of people experiencing an opiate overdose. Narcan has often been referred to as the Epipen of heroin, but David Brooks says that comparison doesn’t hold up in some key ways. Brooks is a reporter for The Concord Monitor and blogs at Granitegeek.org. He spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.

Pool Photo/Geoff Forester, Concord Monitor

The trial of Owen Labrie, a former student at St.Paul’s School charged with raping a 15-year old school mate in 2014, ended last week with his acquittal on the most serious felony rape charges and convictions on several lesser charges.

This case has drawn national media coverage and raised questions about how such cases get reported in an age of instant electronic communication, live-tweeting, and streaming video. 

File photos

It's late August, and that means right now, it's the sweet spot for locally grown food. This brief time allows Granite Staters to harvest what's been growing all summer, and we also get to look forward to the fall picking season. Apples, pumpkins, and more.

Joining me now to talk about the state of New Hampshire's agriculture is George Hamilton, with the UNH Cooperative Extension.

Peter Biello / NHPR

VA Hospitals across the country are beefing up their preventative medicine programs. At the VA hospital in White River Junction, Vermont, a variety of programs open to New Hampshire and Vermont veterans are tackling health problems like obesity, tobacco use, and stress. Some of these programs at VAs across New England are still underutilized.

In a small room at the ground floor of the VA hospital in White River Junction, a handful of veterans sit around a table and talk with a dietitian about a battle they all fight: a battle against body fat.

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

ronmerk / Morguefile

A Merrimack County Superior Court Judge has ordered the closure of the Veterans Museum of New Hampshire and ordered its president, Henry T. Pratte, to pay a $10,000 dollar fine.

GaborfromHungary / Morguefile

When babies are born sick or underweight, they’re often moved to neonatal intensive care units. A new study by the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice has found that admission rates for to intensive care units, or NICUs, are increasing for newborns of all weights. That's raising questions about whether babies are receiving expensive medical care they do not need. 

NHPR's Peter Biello spoke with Wade Harrison, the lead author of this study.

Audio will be available after 6 p.m., Tuesday, August 11, 2015.

Public Domain

In 1870, Marilla Ricker, an attorney from Dover, attempted to cast a ballot in an election, but she was turned away. She tried again every year for the next five decades and was either refused or had her ballot destroyed. Ricker died in 1920, shortly after women won the right to vote. 

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

NHPR Staff

The Executive Council voted yesterday against renewing two family planning contracts for Planned Parenthood centers in New Hampshire. Here are two perspectives on that controversial issue.

Peter Biello / NHPR

Enrollment in a program that tracks the genes of military veterans has picked up the pace at a local VA hospital.

The Million Veteran Program, or MVP, is a nationwide effort to put into a database the genetic information of one million veterans. Researchers will use the database to find genes that affect conditions like diabetes or PTSD.

xandert / Morguefile

The humble little mouse has become big business at Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. The research center uses selective breeding to create mice that have the genetic traits to make them useful for scientists searching for cures to human diseases. David Brooks recently visited Jackson Labs and learned a lot about the business of mice. He’s a columnist for the Nashua Telegraph and writer at Granitegeek.org. He spoke with NHPR's All Things Considered host Peter Biello.
 

Thomas Fearon / NHPR

Veterans Administration hospitals have avoided a shutdown, thanks to legislation passed by Congress.

All the members of New Hampshire’s House and Senate delegations voted this week to authorize the use of $3.3 billion in Veterans Choice funds to plug a hole in the VA’s budget.

Michael Brindley / NHPR

President Obama signed into law Tuesday a bill that would make it easier for veterans to start businesses with loans from the Small Business Administration.

The bill would waive fees for veterans starting up new businesses with SBA loans—which New Hampshire Senator Jeanne Shaheen says will help veterans get started.

"This is bipartisan legislation," Shaheen says. "I introduced it in the last Congress and we reintroduced it. It got support in the House. And I’m very happy the President signed it quickly into law."

jdurham / Morguefile

You’ve heard of open source software. Linux is perhaps the best-known example. But what about open source hardware? It’s not a new idea, but it’s now in New Hampshire proving itself valuable to one of the town of Merrimack’s biggest employers. David Brooks, a columnist for the Nashua Telegraph and writer at Granite Geek.org, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.

David, for the uninitiated, tell us: What is open source hardware?

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

Thomas Fearon

Officials in Lebanon are gearing up to launch New Hampshire’s second veterans court.

Peter Biello / NHPR

New Hampshire's Department of Health and Human Services plans to add 11 positions to help community mental health centers understand military culture. But these eleven workers can’t start until a new state budget is in place—something that has been delayed by partisan fighting.

These workers will be called “community mental health center military culture liaisons.” Ten of them will work part-time at mental health centers throughout the state. The eleventh will work statewide.

Chris Jensen for NHPR

President Obama says all of Iran's pathways to a nuclear weapon are cut off under a landmark agreement announced today. 

File photos / NHPR

New Hampshire’s US Senators say they’re going to carefully review the details of the nuclear deal announced today between Iran and several world powers.

In a statement, Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte calls the deal quote “an historic capitulation,” saying it lacks the ability to make sure Iran complies with the terms of the deal.

Democrat Jeanne Shaheen says she’s also concerned about how to keep Iran honest, but she’s less critical of the deal.

SandJLinkins / MorgueFile

It’s July, and if you’re a gardener, that means little green tomatoes are popping up on your plants, flowers are attracting bees, and fruit trees are filling up with the beginnings of what we’ll harvest this fall. It’s also a time for deer to come by and steal a snack from your garden. David Brooks, a columnist for the Nashua Telegraph and writer at GraniteGeek.org, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about ways to prevent those deer from literally stealing the fruits of your labor.

What is the thing that keeps deer away?

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