Peter Biello

Host, All Things Considered

Peter Biello is the host of All Things Considered at New Hampshire Public Radio. He has served as a producer and host of Weekend Edition Saturday at Vermont Public Radio and as a reporter/host of Morning Edition at WHQR in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Peter has won several AP awards for his journalism, which has appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered and This American Life. He’s also a fiction writer whose work appears or is forthcoming in Gargoyle, Lowestoft Chronicle, Green Writers Press, and South85 Journal. He’s also the founder of Burlington Writers Workshop, a nonprofit writing workshop based in Burlington, Vermont, and co-founder of Mud Season Review, a literary journal featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art that publishes in print annually and online monthly.

Peter lives in Concord, New Hampshire. 

Ways to Connect

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The National Prescription Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta, Georgia, is bringing together lawmakers, health providers, academics, and other national leaders to figure out what can be done to curb the abuse of opioids. New Hampshire Congressman Frank Guinta spoker earlier today at the summit as part of a panel of lawmakers dealing with drug abuse in their states, and he joined All Things Considered to talk about it. 

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Mallory Parkington via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/rupiT

If you live near a river, chances are you’ve imagined what kind of damage a flood could do to your home. It’s difficult to predict what exactly a hard rainfall could bring. And, as we speak, a volunteer network that stretches beyond New Hampshire’s borders is gathering data on rainfall with the goal of predicting likelihood of flooding or other potential hazards. For more on these efforts, we turn to David Brooks. He’s a reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at Granite Geek.org.

Beth via Flicr CC

The New Hampshire House has passed a bill that would require courts to instruct jurors of the option of jury nullification. That’s when a jury can return a verdict of not guilty if the jurors believe a guilty verdict would be unjust. Juries in New Hampshire already have the right to jury nullification, though it’s rarely used.

Joining All Things Considered for a look at jury nullification is Buzz Scherr. He’s a professor at UNH School of Law.

Can you give us an example of how jury nullification has been used in New Hampshire?

Peter Biello / NHPR

This weekend, arm wrestlers from around the country will compete in the Arnold Sports Festival in Columbus, Ohio. Both men and women will be competing, but for women, competitive arm wrestling is relatively new, and not without its challenges. New Hampshire’s Debbie Banaian will be competing in Ohio tomorrow, and she’s made it her mission to grow the women’s arm wrestling community in the Granite State. NHPR’s Peter Biello reports on Banaian’s efforts to recruit more women to the sport.

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Imagine a world where people could choose genetic traits like eye color for their children. This science fiction could be fact due to new gene modification technology called CRISPR.

Here to explain this new technology is David Brooks. He’s a reporter for the Concord Monitor and a writer at Granite Geek.org.

So, explain for us briefly, what is CRISPR?

Elodie Reed / Courtesy of The Concord Monitor

When you’re about to sit down to a meal, and that meal involves a piece of meat—a steak, some chicken, or pork chops, for example—how much do you think about the animal it came from? We all bring a different level of awareness to the dinner table, and it can be uncomfortable for some people to think deeply about the chicken, cow, or pig that was killed to become someone’s food. 

xandert / Morguefile

As average rainfall increases, the culvert becomes an increasingly important part of our infrastructure. These pipes that run under roads allow easy passage for creeks and streams too small to merit actual bridges, but poorly-constructed or undersized culverts could pose huge transportation problems in the event of heavy rains.

You may not have put much thought into the design of the signs on the highway, but right now engineers in New Hampshire are giving careful to how these signs reflect light. An experiment on Interstate 93 is comparing two different kinds of reflectivity to find out which is easier to read at night. Granite Geek David Brooks spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.

The polls had it right when it came to New Hampshire’s presidential primary results—for the most part, anyway. With just a few exceptions, the polls predicted that Donald Trump would win on the Republican side, and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders would beat former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton by a wide margin.

But, historically the polls in New Hampshire haven’t been this accurate. So, what accounts for this increased accuracy? For an answer to that question, we turn to Steve Koczela, President of the MassINC Polling Group. 

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Keene State College

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 The VA’s Veterans Choice Program has been in place for more than a year now. The federal program is meant to allow veterans who live too far from VA hospitals to receive care in their communities.

But some providers treating veterans under the program say they aren’t getting paid for their services. Recently several clinics in New Hampshire decided to drop Veterans Choice.

The town of Peterborough has quietly become the administrative headquarters of the Clay Mathematics Institute, the nonprofit organization that’s seeking answers to seven of the problems that mathematicians have been wrestling with for years. The prize for solving any one of these problems is $1 million. But how did it end up in Peterborough, New Hampshire? Concord Monitor reporter David Brooks spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

Why is Peterborough, New Hampshire now the headquarters for the Clay Mathematics Institute?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Congressman Frank Guinta has introduced legislation that denies bonuses to senior VA executives who fail to deliver timely care to veterans.
 Guinta says the Veterans Administration Bonus Elimination Act would provide an incentive for VA hospital executives to schedule appointments within thirty days of a veteran’s request for one.
 Thirty days is the VA benchmark spelled out in the Veterans Choice law passed in 2014. 

Allegra Boverman / NHPR

New Hampshire Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she shares President Barack Obama's optimism about the future. 

Speaking shortly after the President's final State of the Union address Tuesday night, Shaheen says she agrees that the political system needs to do a better job of facing the nation's challenges.

She also says she was pleased that Obama acknowledged the current prescription drug addiction epidemic in his speech.

"It's particularly good to hear the President of the United States say that this has got to be a national priority."

The New Hampshire American Civil Liberties Union and New Hampshire Legal Assistance are suing the city of Manchester and a police officer for allegedly infringing upon the constitutional rights of panhandlers.

The ACLU argues the Manchester Police Department has been charging panhandlers with disorderly conduct.  Gilles Bissonnette is legal director of the ACLU of New Hampshire. He says the city is applying that charge to legal behavior.

Granite Geek: Wikipedia Turns Fifteen!

Jan 12, 2016

Wikipedia, the world’s largest encyclopedia, will be celebrating its 15th birthday this week with events across the globe. One those events will be held Saturday at Harvard University. For a look at Wikipedia’s first fifteen, we turn to David Brooks. He’s a reporter for The Concord Monitor and writes at GraniteGeek.org. He spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

The New Hampshire Legislature's joint task force on opioid and heroin abuse worked through December to discuss the state's growing drug epidemic. Those recommendations have been sent to the governor and public leaders, and they'll start going through a public hearing process in the legislature next week.

Joining NHPR to talk about what the task force concluded is Senator Jeb Bradley. He served as chair of the task force.

The recommendations your forwarded fell into a few different priority levels. Can you spell them out for us?

AP

While campaigning at New England College today, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke of student debt and other domestic policies. His proposals include providing health care for all Americans and free tuition at public colleges. But how will these be paid for? Sen. Sanders spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello about this policy idea, and much more. 

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Right now Santa and his elves are working hard to build presents in time for Christmas. To build toys for all the good boys and girls on the nice list, how big would Santa’s workshop actually have to be? Granite Geek David Brooks did some "research" on this very question. He writes for The Concord Monitor and GraniteGeek.org. He spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.

David, unfortunately you were not given a tour of Santa's workshop, so you just have to take some educated guesses, right?

Brady Carlson / NHPR

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham ended his presidential campaign this morning. A well-known voice in Republican foreign policy debates, and a frequent visitor to New Hampshire, Graham failed to catch on with voters here. NHPR’s Senior Editor for Politics Dan Barrick spoke with All Things Considered Host Peter Biello, to look back on Graham’s short-lived White House bid.

Hanibaael via Flickr Creative Commons

The Department of Veterans Affairs has been trying to end veteran homelessness by the end of this year. The goal was to achieve and sustain something called “functional zero,” which doesn’t eliminate homelessness, but rather ensures that it’s rare, brief and non-recurring.

Photo courtesy of the NH Dept. of Fish & Game

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Premshee Pillai via Flickr Creative Commons

You’ve heard of a megawatt, a unit of electricity that represents a million watts, or, in other words, enough electricity to power about 1-thousand homes. But you may not have heard of the nega-watt—that’s nega with an “n.” The nega-watt is a term used to describe what happens when businesses are paid to reduce their need for electricity. That, in turn, reduces strain on the grid, and in theory is a good idea to those who want to save the environment.

NuDay Syria

Since last month’s terror attacks in Paris and last week’s mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, the issues of Syrian refugees and radical Islam has risen to the top of the national political  agenda. Presidential candidate Donald Trump in particular has singled out Muslims as potentially dangerous. President Obama recently called on Americans to respect Muslims and separate the vast majority of them from the relatively small number of Islamic radicals.

But are people in New Hampshire answering the president’s call? Nadia Alawa, the founder and president of NuDay Syria, a local nonprofit that focuses on empowerment and help with dignity to Syria's mothers and children, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

Courtesy / Veterans Administration

A mobile clinic for veterans in the North Country has seen a few dozen patients since it opened in late October.  The clinic is set up in the parking lot of the Androscoggin Valley Hospital in Berlin.  A doctor and nurse team there have been able to give out flu shots and other treatments. VA spokesman Rick Salgueiro says there are about 1,000 veterans in the Berlin area who could possibly avoid a long trip to the VA hospital in White River Junction, Vermont.  "We wanted to rapidly deploy primary care into the Berlin area based on what veterans are communicating they want," he says.

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