Peter Biello

Host, All Things Considered

Peter Biello is the host of All Things Considered at New Hampshire Public Radio. He has served as a producer and host of Weekend Edition Saturday at Vermont Public Radio and as a reporter/host of Morning Edition at WHQR in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Peter has won several AP awards for his journalism, which has appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered and This American Life. He’s also a fiction writer whose work appears or is forthcoming in Gargoyle, Lowestoft Chronicle, Green Writers Press, and South85 Journal. He’s also the founder of Burlington Writers Workshop, a nonprofit writing workshop based in Burlington, Vermont, and co-founder of Mud Season Review, a literary journal featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art that publishes in print annually and online monthly.

Peter lives in Concord, New Hampshire. 

Ways to Connect

Flikr Creative Commons / BiologyCorner

New numbers released by the College Board show that for every New Hampshire girl who took the AP or “Advanced Placement” exam in computer science, more than 7 boys took it. It’s just one example of the gender divide in fields of study in New Hampshire. David Brooks, a reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at Granitegeek.org, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

That number is huge. More than seven boys, actually 7.47 boys, for every one girl taking the AP computer science exam. Is this surprising to you?

JonJon2k8 via Flickr Creative Commons

This far into the campaign season, polls are generating lots of headlines. And if you live in New Hampshire, polling firms have likely been calling you and hundreds of other Granite Staters. But how do those polling firms find you? How do they choose their questions, and what do they do with your information?  For more on this, we turn to David Brooks who’s a reporter with The Concord Monitor, writer at GraniteGeek.org, and he’s moderating a Science Café panel discussion about this very subject Wednesday, October 21st at 6 p.m.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

The holiday season is fast approaching, and coming along with it is the stress associated with making travel plans or preparing big meals for family gatherings. That stress could take a toll on your body as well as your mind. It could cause back pain, insomnia and stomach problems, just to name a few.

We know that rest is a good way to cut down some of these problems. But now a new study demonstrates that relaxation programs could reduce your medical bills as well. 

These days lotteries are everywhere. Walk into most convenience stores and you’ll see scratch tickets on sale. Big Powerball payouts stretching across state lines make headlines, but fifty years ago the idea that lotteries were sinful and contributed to society’s moral decay was more widespread than it is today.

You may be surprised to learn that in the 1960s New Hampshire was the first state to launch a legal lottery. It came after a fight involving politicians of opposing sides, religious moralists, mob members, and the FBI.

Dale Van Cor / Rockethub.com

Sometimes it's the most basic of technologies that stand the test of time. Take the simple screw. It’s a bit of metal with threads spiraling down a shaft, and yet it holds together most of the products and tools we use every day. But one New Hampshire inventor is challenging that time-honored design. David Brooks, a reporter for the Concord Monitor and writer at GraniteGeek.org, spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

Hanibaael via Flickr Creative Commons

The Manchester VA hospital and the not-for-profit Harbor Homes are teaming up for an event in Nashua Thursday that’ll help homeless veterans connect to services and prepare for winter.

The event at Harbor Homes is the seventh annual “Homeless Veteran Stand Down.” It’s a chance for homeless veterans to pick up donated winter clothes, eat a free breakfast and lunch, and get haircuts and flu shots.

Courtesy The University Of New Hampshire

A grant that helps veterans with disabilities through a program at the University of New Hampshire has been renewed.

The federal grant of $300,000 will go to Northeast Passage, which provides veterans with recreation therapy.

jessie owen via flickr Creative Commons

President Obama has signed into law a bill that amends the Affordable Care Act to protect small and mid-size businesses from premium increases.

New Hampshire Democratic Senator Jeanne Shaheen had introduced the legislation called the Protecting Affordable Coverage for Employees (or PACE) Act along with Republican Tim Scott of South Carolina.

Next year, the definition of state-based small group markets was set to expand from businesses with fewer than 50 employees to 100 employees.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Courtroom One Gavel
Joe Gratz / Flickr Creative Commons

Senator Jeanne Shaheen has introduced legislation that aims to help the Veterans Administration support veterans' courts.

The Veterans Justice Outreach Act would codify the support that the VA already gives to veterans' courts. That support comes in part in the form of case managers, who work as liaisons for veterans in the local courts and jails.

Through these courts, military veterans accused of non-violent crimes can be diverted away from jail and towards treatment programs.

ilovebutter via Flickr Creative Commons

It’s October, and it’s supposed to be foliage season. But the splendor of the foliage in Northern New England isn’t what it used to be. Climate change, local pollution, invasive species, disease and development have all conspired to change the multicolored landscape to make it less so. NHPR's Peter Biello spoke with David Brooks, a reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at GraniteGeek.org

Screenshot via YouTube

NHPR’s Josh Rogers spoke with All Things Considered host Peter Biello to discuss Gov. Maggie Hassan's announcement that she is running for U.S. Senate in 2016.

BIELLO: So, long anticipated, now official. What’s this mean?

Joanna Eldredge Morrissey / Bauhan Publishing, LLC

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

Eli Burakian / Dartmouth College

The Dartmouth employee at the center of a controversial appointment at the school’s Native American Program will no longer serve as its director. 

The college announced Thursday afternoon that the distraction around Susan Taffe Reed’s appointment keeps her from effectively doing the job.

The Native American Program is not an academic department. It’s a program that supports and mentors the school’s 91 Native American students.

Taffe Reed is president of Eastern Delaware Nations in Pennsylvania, a nonprofit run by her family. It is not a federally recognized tribe.

Photo by Garrett via Flickr Creative Commons

Fans of Apple products will soon line up to buy the latest versions of the iPhone 6, which are available starting Friday. But if you haven’t already reserved one of the devices, you may want to hold off on getting in line at a New Hampshire store. 

You’ve heard of the Nobel Prize—the award bestowed upon those who have achieved great things in a variety of fields. But you may not have heard of the Ig Nobel Prizes. That’s a parody of the Nobel Prize that’s given out to unusual or trivial achievements in science. David Brooks, a reporter with The Concord Monitor and writer at GraniteGeek.org spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

David, it seems like there’s a contradiction there in trivial achievement.What is meant by these Ig Nobel Prizes?

Courtesy of Bauhan Publishing

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

Michael Winters

If you’ve been to Sonny’s Tavern in Dover, New Hampshire on a Tuesday night, you could be forgiven for feeling like you’ve stepped into a New Orleans jazz club. The eight musicians that make up the Seacoast-based Soggy Po Boys bring the brassy music of Nawlins to Dover on Tuesday nights and to bars and other stages all over the seacoast—and sometimes, if you’re up for it, you can even join them on stage and make music with the band. The Soggy Po Poys are set to release a new album tomorrow at Book and Bar in Portsmouth.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Peter Biello / NHPR

Library officials in Lebanon have agreed to resume support of Tor, an anonymous web browsing service.

The Kilton Public Library in Lebanon had set up in July what’s called a “relay node.” That’s one link in a chain of computers protects Tor users’ anonymity.

Library officials turned off the relay node after local police raised concerns about Tor’s role in facilitating the exchange of child pornography and drugs.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 Voters in Manchester go to the polls Tuesday for a primary election that will narrow down a field of five candidates for mayor that includes, most prominently, the three-term incumbent Ted Gatsas. Contributor and former city politics reporter for the Union Leader Ted Siefer spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello. 

First of all, the current mayor, Ted Gatsas, is a well-known political figure in the state and won his past three elections by comfortable margins. Is he considered vulnerable this time around?

The first library in the country to become part of the anonymous web browsing service Tor has disconnected from that network, at least for now.

Officials at the Kilton Public Library in Lebanon were contacted by local law enforcement with concerns about Tor’s ability to conceal criminal activity. Library officials chose to disconnect from Tor pending further review.

None of the computers at the library had the Tor browser.

Peter Biello / NHPR

In the southwestern United States, the cost of harvesting chili peppers is rising, and competitors in Mexico have the advantage of cheaper labor. Enter Nag Kodali, an inventor from Pelham, New Hampshire. He’s invented a device that could help mechanize the chili harvesting process. 

At a machine shop in North Billerica, Massachusetts, Nag Kodali makes a few adjustments to his creation: a roughly twelve-foot long system of conveyor belts designed to gently remove pepper stems.

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Officials in Franklin have voted to reinstate the city's curfew for children under the age of 16.

The curfew had been in effect for two decades but was recently suspended. Under the curfew, reinstated by vote of the city council, children would need to be out of public areas after 9 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and after 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday evenings. Parents of children caught violating the curfew could face fines.

Flickr user "btckeychain."

When you buy or sell a home, at some point in the process, you’ve got to check the property against a central database, usually at the town clerk’s office. And when you buy or sell something with the digital currency bitcoin, that bitcoin has to be registered somewhere so it can’t be spent twice. That registry, which functions kind of like a digital town clerk’s office, is called the block chain. Right now the state of Vermont is paving the way for entrepreneurs and governments to use the block chain for other purposes.

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

PunchingJudy via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/3WYLgF

 Lawmakers and Governor Maggie Hassan supported legislation this year to make Narcan more accessible so it can be used to save the lives of people experiencing an opiate overdose. Narcan has often been referred to as the Epipen of heroin, but David Brooks says that comparison doesn’t hold up in some key ways. Brooks is a reporter for The Concord Monitor and blogs at Granitegeek.org. He spoke with NHPR's Peter Biello.

Pool Photo/Geoff Forester, Concord Monitor

The trial of Owen Labrie, a former student at St.Paul’s School charged with raping a 15-year old school mate in 2014, ended last week with his acquittal on the most serious felony rape charges and convictions on several lesser charges.

This case has drawn national media coverage and raised questions about how such cases get reported in an age of instant electronic communication, live-tweeting, and streaming video. 

File photos

It's late August, and that means right now, it's the sweet spot for locally grown food. This brief time allows Granite Staters to harvest what's been growing all summer, and we also get to look forward to the fall picking season. Apples, pumpkins, and more.

Joining me now to talk about the state of New Hampshire's agriculture is George Hamilton, with the UNH Cooperative Extension.

Peter Biello / NHPR

VA Hospitals across the country are beefing up their preventative medicine programs. At the VA hospital in White River Junction, Vermont, a variety of programs open to New Hampshire and Vermont veterans are tackling health problems like obesity, tobacco use, and stress. Some of these programs at VAs across New England are still underutilized.

In a small room at the ground floor of the VA hospital in White River Junction, a handful of veterans sit around a table and talk with a dietitian about a battle they all fight: a battle against body fat.

Pages