Peter Biello

Host, All Things Considered

Peter Biello is the host of All Things Considered at New Hampshire Public Radio. He has served as a producer and host of Weekend Edition Saturday at Vermont Public Radio and as a reporter/host of Morning Edition at WHQR in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Peter has won several AP awards for his journalism, which has appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered and This American Life. He’s also a fiction writer whose work appears or is forthcoming in Gargoyle, Lowestoft Chronicle, Green Writers Press, and South85 Journal. He’s also the founder of Burlington Writers Workshop, a nonprofit writing workshop based in Burlington, Vermont, and co-founder of Mud Season Review, a literary journal featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art that publishes in print annually and online monthly.

Peter lives in Concord, New Hampshire. 

Ways to Connect

Peter Biello / NHPR

Over the weekend, New Hampshire poets came together to celebrate poetry.  The celebration came at a time when poetry itself is losing popularity. A National Endowment for the Arts survey last year shows fewer and fewer people are reading it.

But if you spent a couple of days in Manchester this past weekend, like I did, you would have found a community of poets whose passion for the poem is as strong as ever.

Elizabeth Lies / Unsplash

If you’re looking to build a home or if you’re a civil engineer trying to plan for some big new project, you’re going to want to know what the future will be like for that plot of land you’d like to build on. Climate change makes that difficult. It’s hard to predict, for example, what rainfall will be, or whether ocean levels will rise. How, then, do we proceed with investments in our personal or collective futures?

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Cheryl Senter, NHPR

Today, the Union Leader did something unusual: It endorsed a candidate for president who was not the Republican nominee. The paper bypassed Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to endorse Gary Johnson and his vice presidential running mate, Bill Weld.

We’d like to take a moment to remember former NHPR President and General Manager Mark Handley, who died recently after battling cancer. Handley will be remembered as the leader who transformed NHPR into a statewide network.

Allegra Boverman

Congressman Frank Guinta is running for re-election to New Hampshire’s first district, but he faces a tough primary fight with defense industry executive Republican Rich Ashooh.  Guinta spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello about his policy ideas. 

Let’s start with the state’s opioid crisis. More than four hundred overdose deaths in New Hampshire last year. That number may exceed 500 this year. What would you do to reverse this trend?

Peter Biello / NHPR

Former defense industry executive Republican Rich Ashooh is running for Congress in New Hampshire’s first district. He’s hoping to unseat incumbent Republican Frank Guinta. 

In recent interviews and debates, he’s characterized himself as an outsider, a new face, someone who could succeed where the incumbent has failed. Rich Ashooh spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about his ideas.

Texas A&M AgriLife

Algae blooms in lakes and ponds across northern New England are becoming more and more common. These can kill fish and cause terrible odors. Now there’s an app to track these blooms. BloomWatch allows users to easily report when they know of a pond that has suddenly blossomed with microscopic bacteria. Granite Geek David Brooks has been writing about the app for his column this week in The Concord Monitor and he spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello.

Peter Biello / NHPR

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

A bill introduced by Democratic Rep. Annie Kuster would launch pilot programs in five states to reduce the use of opioid medications and increase the use of alternative treatments.

Pete Wright via Unsplash

“Makerspaces” are popping up in cities across the country, and the New Hampshire town of Amherst is about to get one of its own. These places usually charge a monthly fee for access to tools that might be too costly to buy and store at your home. For example, 3D printers, welding gear, table saws—all tools that may require a large investment for your relatively small project.

Mike Wilson / Unsplash

RGGI turns ten years old this month. RGGI—that’s the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative—was conceived as an agreement between seven northeast states, including New Hampshire, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions created by the production of electricity.

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.  This week, The Bookshelf features author Yona Zeldis McDonough.

Ben Hill / UNH

Most people don’t think of the dead of winter as being the best time to harvest leafy greens. Most of them are probably buried under feet of snow. But researchers at the University of New Hampshire have discovered that spinach is sweetest when picked in the winter months.

David P. Whelan / Morguefile

It’s easy enough to check the weather before you head out for a hike. Maybe you click on the weather app on your smartphone, scan for thunderstorms, and plan accordingly. But when it comes to going for a swim, real-time information on water conditions is not just a click away.

Patricia Williams

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

This week, The Bookshelf features novelist Deena Goldstone. She joined Peter Biello to discuss her book Surprise Me.

Kate Harper for NHPR

A new WBUR poll of New Hampshire voters shows that Democrat Hillary Clinton has a commanding lead over her Republican rival Donald Trump in this year’s general election. The poll also has good news for Democrat Maggie Hassan’s bid to unseat Republican Senator Kelly Ayotte. Steve Koczela joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to dissect the results of the poll. Koczela is president of MassINC Polling Group, which conducted the WBUR survey.

Jack Rodolico, NHPR

This week, NHPR has been looking at what homelessness means in New Hampshire. As part of our series No Place to Go: Homeless in New Hampshire,  we visited the PK Motel in Effingham, and heard about how having a roof over your head isn’t the same as having a home.

So where is that line so many families are straddling, between financial insecurity and having no place to live?

Dean Christon is Executive Director of New Hampshire’s Housing Finance Authority and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk through some of these issues.

Doug Kerr

Communities in New Hampshire are grappling with this question: where are homeless people supposed to go? Cities tend to answer that question by spelling out where homeless people can’t be, imposing bans on panhandling and camping. That's often called criminalizing homelessness.

We hear now about one city that recently came together to strike down one of those bans—Lebanon, N.H. Tim McNamara is on the city council there and was at the public hearing where over 100 people turned out. He joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to talk about these issues.

David Brooks / Concord Monitor

As software becomes more sophisticated, it has taken over jobs usually completed by humans or machines. A new kind of software technology called “Software-Defined Networking” is enabling software to take the place of certain kinds of machinery. A lab in Durham has recently begun taking a closer look at Software-Defined Networking, and Granite Geek David Brooks joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to give us the details.

Natasha Haverty, NHPR

Ten years ago policy makers in New Hampshire made an ambitious promise: to end homelessness by 2016. We haven’t gotten there yet.

As part of our special series on homelessness called 'No Place To Go,' NHPR's Jack Rodolico and Natasha Haverty reported the story of one homeless man, Gene Parker, who lived on the streets of Concord for five years before being struck and killed by a car this winter.

Cathy Kuhn directs New Hampshire’s Coalition to End Homelessness and joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss where the issue stands today.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

New Hampshire Party Chair and Delegate Ray Buckley is wrapping up his week in Philadelphia at the Democratic National Convention. Buckley is the first openly gay politician to serve as President of the Association of State Democratic Chairs and a Vice Chair of the Democratic National Committee. Buckley has met several times with the DNC’s LGBT Caucus this week, and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello Thursday to discuss their final meeting.

Give us a sense of what issues the LGBT Caucus has been discussing this week.

grzessiek / Morguefile

Seven mothers took up the stage at the Democratic National Convention to speak out against gun violence in America. In addition to voicing support for Democratic nominee for President Hillary Clinton, they condemned alleged police brutality and racism in the justice system. They also advocated for what they called “Common-Sense” gun control. Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, said, “Hillary Clinton has the compassion and understanding to comfort a grieving mother. She has the courage to lead the fight for common-sense gun legislation.”

Mary RN / Morguefile

Astrid Silva came to the United States as an undocumented Mexican immigrant and she spoke last night at the Democratic Convention in favor of Hillary Clinton. She said, “I know she will fight to keep our families together. Nuestras familias. I know she will.”

Joining NHPR’s Peter Biello today to discuss issues of immigration in New Hampshire is Alejandro Urrutia, a doctor originally from Mexico.

Bruce Marlin / Creative Commons

It’s an almost magical aspect of summer nights in New Hampshire: the sight of fireflies glowing in the darkness, hoping to attract mates. Granite Geek David Brooks recently began to worry about the population of fireflies. It seemed to him like there were fewer of them. So like any good journalist, he went to an expert to gain insight on this observation, and he joins me now to talk about what he found. David’s here now. Welcome.

Deb Cram

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

The state Attorney General's office says a police officer was justified in the fatal shooting of a 19 year old man in Peterborough last month. Details on the incident have been scarce up to this point, but NHPR's Brady Carlson has been reading through the AG's report and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello with more.

Peter Biello

As the world’s population increases, so does the demand for food. One way to keep up with demand would be, logically, to just produce more food. Some argue that a better strategy would be to simply stop wasting so much food. Granite Geek David Brooks writes about food waste for his column this week in The Concord Monitor and he joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss his findings.

Two state police troopers have been arrested and charged with simple assault after an incident in May in which the troopers allegedly beat a man who led them on a chase northern Massachusetts and Southern New Hampshire. 

Attorney General Joseph Foster announced the charges Tuesday afternoon against Trooper Andrew Monaco of the New Hampshire State Police and Trooper Joseph Flynn of the Massachusetts State Police. 

Van McLeod, Commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Cultural Resources, died Monday morning.

He was commissioner for 24 years. McLeod oversaw the Council of the Arts, the Television and Film Office, the State Library, and the Division of Historical Resources. He was instrumental in developing New Hampshire’s cultural community.

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