Peter Biello

Host, All Things Considered

Peter Biello is the host of All Things Considered at New Hampshire Public Radio. He has served as a producer and host of Weekend Edition Saturday at Vermont Public Radio and as a reporter/host of Morning Edition at WHQR in Wilmington, North Carolina.

Peter has won several AP awards for his journalism, which has appeared on NPR’s All Things Considered and This American Life. He’s also a fiction writer whose work appears or is forthcoming in Gargoyle, Lowestoft Chronicle, Green Writers Press, and South85 Journal. He’s also the founder of Burlington Writers Workshop, a nonprofit writing workshop based in Burlington, Vermont, and co-founder of Mud Season Review, a literary journal featuring fiction, nonfiction, poetry and visual art that publishes in print annually and online monthly.

Peter lives in Concord, New Hampshire. 

Ways to Connect

P. Queen / Morguefile

A seven-year long battle between dairy farmers and the large dairy companies that buy raw milk came to an end last week. A federal judge approved the settlement of an antitrust case that alleged that Dairy Farmers of America, Dairy Marketing Services, and Dean Foods worked together to drive down milk prices in the Northeast.

Farmers in eleven states, including New Hampshire and the District of Columbia, will be getting payments under the agreement. New Hampshire farmer Steve Taylor helped outline the settlement conditions. He joined NHPR’s Peter Biello to discuss the lawsuit.

Larry Farr / Morguefile

Representatives from Merrimack County voted last week on a proposal that would convert the old jail in Boscawen into a community corrections center for inmates. The new facility will provide inpatient treatment and housing for work release, helping to transition inmates back into the community. Superintendent Ross Cunningham is directing the project, and he spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello about their plan.

How will this new community corrections center help inmates?

Gundina / Morguefile

Think back for a moment to last December. Do you think it was warmer than average? Colder? About average?

A new study suggests that your answer to that question may depend on a few factors, such as whether or not you believe in climate change or how many kids you have. By the way, December was warmer than average—much warmer, with temperatures shooting nearly 14 degrees above the average.

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Darnok / Morguefile

Here’s a philosophical question for you: was math invented or was it discovered?

Lois R. Shea / NH Cheritable Foundation

The University of New Hampshire is working on a new app that's designed to help survivors of sexual assault, set to launch in the fall. Called “uSafeNH,” the app will provides information on local crisis centers, hospitals, police and other resources.

Loon Biologist Praises New Lead Sinker Ban

Jun 3, 2016
AcrylicArtist / Morguefile

A ban on lead tackle in New Hampshire has gone into effect, with the hope that lead tackle will stop killing loons. Lead tackle was the largest cause of loon mortality between 1989 and 2011. Harry Vogel is a senior biologist and executive director at the Loon Preservation Committee. He spoke with NHPR's All Things Considered host Peter Biello. 

How does the loon come into contact with the lead tackle—does it think its food?

Amy Wilson

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Last week was a big news week for residents dealing with water contamination issues in New Hampshire and across the country. 

kconnors / Morguefile

The United States Supreme Court has rejected ExxonMobil’s appeal of a $236 million verdict in a case brought against the oil company by the state of New Hampshire.

The legal battle began more than a decade ago when the state Attorney General sued 22 oil companies for using a chemical called MtBE, which can contaminate soil and drinking water.

Richard Head was an Associate Attorney General at the time and now works for SL Environmental Law Group, which worked with the state on the suit. He spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello.

NHPR Staff

A new WBUR poll of likely New Hampshire voters shows Democrat Hillary Clinton with a slight edge over Republican Donald Trump. In the state's U.S. Senate race, the poll also found Democrat Maggie Hassan with a small lead over incumbent Republican Sen. Kelly Ayotte. For more on this poll, we turn to Steve Koszela, president of the MassINC polling group, which conducted the survey. He spoke with NHPR's All Things Considered host Peter Biello.

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

GaborfromHungary / Morguefile

Massive Open Online Courses, also known as MOOCs, have become a popular way in recent years to take a course at a prestigious university without having to pay for it. You can view the course material online and follow a lesson plan. Some of these require payment for any kind of official certification, but the lessons are free, and several universities, including MIT, Harvard, and Dartmouth, are offering these. A MOOC at Dartmouth uses illustrations made by the Vermont Center for Cartoon Studies to help teach basic engineering concepts.

Eddie Cheuk

Former students at elite private schools all over New England are coming forward with allegations that teachers and school officials sexually abused them. The schools in question include several in New Hampshire, St. Paul's School and Shaker Road School in Concord, Cardigan Mountain School in Canaan, Brewster Academy in Wolfeboro, and Phillips Exeter Academy. 

NHPR

With Ted Cruz and John Kasich pulling the plugs on their presidential campaigns, it's a big week for backers of likely Republican nominee Donald Trump.  

And that's got some conservatives in New Hampshire coming to terms with a new reality: Donald Trump is now the official face of their party.  

It’s time to stuff your pants into your socks because we’re entering tick season in New Hampshire.

David Brooks is a reporter for the Concord Monitor and writes the weekly Granite Geek column. He's hosting a Science Café this evening at which the topic will be Lyme disease. He spoke with All Things Considered host Peter Biello.

David, the drought made it hard for the ticks to survive. How badly did it damage the tick population?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Veterans who receive care for chronic pain through the VA's Veterans Choice program may soon have fewer options for treatment.

The private New Hampshire-based company, PainCare, is once again considering cutting ties with the Veterans Choice program and the company that administers it, Health Net, Inc., because Health Net allegedly continues to delay payments to PainCare doctors. PainCare operates 11 clinics in New Hampshire. 

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

This presidential campaign season has provided plenty of fodder for satire. Two men from Keene—Blake Amacker and Stephen Polzwartek—have decided to satirize it with a board game. It’s called "Trunks ‘n Asses," and fans of Cards Against Humanity may find a lot to like in this game. They’re raising money to mass-produce the game on Kickstarter. They spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello about the game.

fellowdesigns / Morguefile

Next time you’re heading through Hooksett, N.H. on I-93, look for a Tesla electric car stopped at one of the dozen charging stations. Chances are, you won’t find a Tesla or any other kind of electric vehicle there. These stations are not used very often. David Brooks, reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at Granitegeek.org, spoke with NHPR’s All Things Considered host Peter Biello about why these charging stations are so infrequently used.

trestletech / Morguefile

If you’ve ever wanted to change the color of something—your car, a wall in your dining room, or even your shirt—you may have wished that you could just snap your fingers and voila, you’ve got a new color. It’s a skill that cephalopods like squid and octopuses have already mastered. Now some scientists are studying this ability in squid so they can learn how to make materials and fabrics change color in the blink of an eye.

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

the829 / Morguefile

Artificial intelligence has come a long way in the past few decades, and recently it’s taken a step forward that has left some folks feeling a little dismayed. A computer program is now able to beat the best Go players in the world—something it hasn’t been able to do before. And it did so by learning. The computer was able to study millions of examples of the game and learn how to beat human competitors. NHPR's Peter Biello spoke with David Brooks, a reporter for The Concord Monitor and writer at Granitegeek.org, about "deep learning." 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

As part of our coverage of the 2016 elections, NHPR is broadcasting a series of conversations with candidates about the issues of the day.

All Things Considered host Peter Biello spoke with U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte on Friday. Ayotte, a Republican, is facing a challenge from Democrat and N.H. Governor Maggie Hassan in a race that's drawing national attention.

Courtesy VA Hospital

New reports from the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General have revealed evidence of wait time record manipulation at the VA hospitals in Manchester, New Hampshire and White River Junction, Vermont.  Multiple sources involved in scheduling veterans for appointments reported fudging numbers by offering veterans the first available appointment, rather than allowing the veteran to determine how soon they need to be seen.

Thomas Fearon / NHPR

New reports show the Manchester, N.H. and White River Junction, Vt. Veterans Administration Medical Centers manipulated records to make wait times for appointments appear shorter than they actually were.

  The reports by the VA Office of Inspector General found that veterans at both hospitals were being scheduled according to appointment availability, not when the veteran wanted the appointment. 

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Peter Biello for NHPR

Thirty-eight-year old James Vara is about to become the state's so-called Drug Czar. For another few weeks, he'll be wrapping up his work as a Senior Assistant Attorney General at the Department of Justice, but when he starts his new position, he'll be taking a leading role in solving a problem that killed more than four hundred people in New Hampshire last year: the state's opiate addiction crisis.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The National Prescription Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit in Atlanta, Georgia, is bringing together lawmakers, health providers, academics, and other national leaders to figure out what can be done to curb the abuse of opioids. New Hampshire Congressman Frank Guinta spoker earlier today at the summit as part of a panel of lawmakers dealing with drug abuse in their states, and he joined All Things Considered to talk about it. 

The Bookshelf is NHPR's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State. All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. 

If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

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