Philip Reeves

Philip Reeves is an award-winning veteran international correspondent based in Islamabad, Pakistan. Previous to his current role, he covered Europe out of NPR's bureau in London.

Reeves has spent two decades working as a journalist overseas, reporting from a wide range of places including the former Soviet Union, the Middle East and Asia.

A member of the NPR team that won highly prestigious Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University and George Foster Peabody awards for coverage of the conflict in Iraq, Reeves has been honored several times by the South Asian Journalists Association.

In 2010, Reeves moved to London from New Delhi after a stint of more than seven years working in and around South Asia. He traveled widely in India, taking listeners on voyages along the Ganges River and the ancient Grand Trunk Road. He also made numerous trips to cover unrest and political turmoil in Pakistan.

Reeves joined NPR in 2004, after spending 17 years as a correspondent for the British daily newspaper, The Independent. During the early stages of his career, he worked for BBC radio and television after training on the Bath Chronicle newspaper in western Britain.

Over the years, Reeves has covered a wide range of stories - from the Waco siege, to the growth of the Internet, Boris Yeltsin's erratic presidency, the economic rise of India, and conflicts in Gaza and the West Bank, Chechnya, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sri Lanka.

Graduating from Cambridge University, Reeves earned a degree in English literature. He and his wife have one daughter. His family originates from New Zealand.

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Asia
6:29 am
Fri November 28, 2014

In Pakistan, Political Oratory Is Flourishing

Originally published on Fri November 28, 2014 7:16 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Asia
4:38 pm
Mon November 17, 2014

Diplomacy Through Cricket? It's All In How You Spin It

Originally published on Mon November 17, 2014 9:59 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
12:48 pm
Sat November 1, 2014

A Taliban Hostage's Story: Educating Children Who Have No Teachers

Professor Ajmal Khan was held captive in South Waziristan, the Pakistani tribal area bordering Afghanistan where the Taliban holds power.
B.K. Bangash AP

Originally published on Mon November 3, 2014 1:02 pm

A compelling Facebook photo shows an old man wearing spectacles and a shawl. He's standing in front of a cracked mud wall. Most of his face is filled by a huge, dusty-looking white beard. He looks tired and sad.

Only the man's family and friends would know that he is not, in fact, a weather-beaten mountain tribesman, but the vice chancellor of one of the most distinguished universities in Pakistan.

This picture of professor Ajmal Khan, posted on the Web by his supporters, was printed by a newspaper when he was freed, after spending four years as a hostage of the Taliban.

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Middle East
10:45 am
Thu August 21, 2014

Hamas Senior Leaders Killed In Predawn Israeli Airstrike

Originally published on Thu August 21, 2014 1:07 pm

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Middle East
5:27 pm
Tue August 19, 2014

Blocked At The Border, Gaza Man's Hopes Of Escape Fade

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 7:38 pm

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Asia
6:52 am
Thu June 26, 2014

Airlines Suspend Flights To Pakistani City After Shooting

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 2:19 pm

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The largest airline in the Middle East says it has suspended flights to a city in Pakistan. Emirates says it will no longer fly to Peshawar, at least for now. This is after someone opened fire on a Pakistani passenger jet that was coming in to land there. NPR's Philip Reeves reports on a blow to Pakistan at a time of crisis.

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The Salt
11:58 am
Fri June 13, 2014

Pakistani Juice Drink Packs A Sweet And Spicy Punch

A man drinks aloo pokhara, a heart-comforting prune juice in Islamabad.
Abdul Sattar NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 6:54 pm

You don't often see a man cheerily quaffing from a half-pint mug on a street corner in Pakistan's capital, Islamabad.

But the drink in this gentleman's hand is as innocent as a newborn kitten.

It's called aloo bukhara juice, and contains tamarind and dried plums, or prunes, if you prefer.

Summer's reaching a punishing peak here - it's 104 degrees Fahrenheit - so I assumed he was just drinking to keep cool.

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The Two-Way
1:01 pm
Thu June 12, 2014

Pakistan May Not Have Made The World Cup Cut, But The Ball Is Another Story

Pakistan beat out rivals China and India to produce the Adidas Brazuca, the official ball of the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil.
Adrian Dennis AFP/Getty Images

As the World Cup bonanza kicks off in Brazil, it'll be watched with unusual interest by a nation on the other side of the globe that enjoys no international success whatever on the soccer field.

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Asia
5:37 am
Tue June 10, 2014

Taliban Claim Credit For Another Attack In Karachi

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 12:25 pm

Militants are attacking a security training facility near the Karachi airport. The incident comes less than two days after a deadly attack on the Karachi airport itself.

World
4:27 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

Pakistani Woman Beaten To Death By Her Family As Police Stand By

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 11:16 am

Pakistan is reeling from the latest so-called "honor killing." A pregnant woman was stoned to death just feet from a courthouse for marrying a man against her family's wishes. Police stood by as family members, including a woman, took part in the killing.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Music
8:07 am
Sat April 26, 2014

A Millionaire Saves The Silenced Symphonies Of Pakistan

Izzat Majeed address a crowd in New York during a collaborative concert between Sachal Studios musicians and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. The Lahore-born philanthropist founded a recording studio and provided opportunities for musicians in Pakistan.
Hiroyuki Ito Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 11:30 am

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Asia
5:19 am
Thu April 10, 2014

2 Pakistani Musicians Gain Fame Singing Political Satire

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 7:54 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

There's also anxiety in Pakistan because it is a country where you can get into big trouble because of what you say. Recently, gunmen there opened fire on a prominent journalist who's a critic of Islamic extremism, killing his driver. Twenty-five journalists have been killed over the last decade. Non-journalists like the young activist Malala Yousafzai have been attacked. NPR's Philip Reeves went to see two young Pakistanis who think they're better off singing about their political views than talking. He sent this postcard from Lahore.

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Europe
4:20 pm
Mon December 16, 2013

The Shipping Forecast: From Britain's Seas Into Its Soul

Fisherman Teddy Head tells a story to a group of children while mending his nets in Hastings in 1952. The fishermen of Hastings are tightknit; fathers, brothers and sons work together in rugged boats no more than about 30 feet long. Some families in Hastings have worked this way for centuries.
Fred Morley Getty Images

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 2:29 pm

It is a bizarre nightly ritual that is deeply embedded in the British way of life.

You switch off the TV, lock up the house, slip into bed, turn on your radio, and begin to listen to a mantra, delivered by a soothing, soporific voice.

"Viking, North Utsire, South Utsire, Forties, Cromarty, Forth, Tyne, Dogger ...." says the voice.

You are aware — vaguely — that these delicious words are names, and that those names refer to big blocks of sea around your island nation, stretching all the way up to Iceland and down to North Africa.

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Europe
4:57 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Skateboarders Mobilize As Art Center Tries To Reclaim Cavern

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:20 pm

Transcript

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From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

In medieval times, the south bank of the River Thames in London was full of seedy theaters, brothels and scoundrels. But centuries later, it has become one of the world's finest centers for the arts. Recent plans to expand the arts center has revealed a uniquely, contemporary conflict. As NPR's Philip Reeves reports, this conflict is reviving grassroots activism in Britain's capital.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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World
6:19 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

U.K. Lawmakers Vote Against Syria Strike

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 6:04 am

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This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

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