Sam Sanders

Sam has worked at Vermont Public Radio since October 1978 in various capacities – almost always involving audio engineering. He excels at sound engingeering for live performances.

Sam has been an audio engineer for most of his professional life. From 1965 to 1978 he was the Supervising Audio Technician at the New York Public Library Record Archives at Lincoln Center.

He enjoys camping, hiking, canoeing, and contra dancing; and he loves to travel, especially to Peru and the Caribbean. Sam has served for many years as a volunteer in response to the AIDS epidemic.

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I'm David Greene in Des Moines, Iowa, at Smokey Row, a coffeehouse in Des Moines.

Renee, you should really see this. It is - I mean it is hundreds of people, I think, just packed in here.

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What does The Internet call a woman who scares Donald Trump out of a presidential debate?

a) Bitch
b) Slut
c) Whore
d) Bimbo
e) Megyn Kelly
f) All of the above

This week, the answer was F. Let us explain.

Since 1972, Iowa has held the first presidential nominating contests in the country. Over the years, the Iowa caucuses have grown in size, scope and importance, sometimes launching underdogs to the presidency or upsetting established political juggernauts.

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The silent majority is a phrase with a long history in politics. And those two words have been used a lot on the campaign trail by Donald Trump. NPR's Sam Sanders recently asked Trump supporters want silent majority means to them.

Depending on whom you ask, South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley's State of the Union response this week was either going to save the modern Republican Party or kill conservatism.

This week, those differing responses evoked two different hashtags. Both, in some ways, were about Haley's heritage, and they bring to light the tricky way she'll have to navigate race should she take on a more prominent role in the 2016 election.

#DeportNikkiHaley

Phil Robertson, patriarch of the hit A&E reality show Duck Dynasty, has endorsed Texas Sen. Ted Cruz for president. The announcement was made with a YouTube video showing Robertson and Cruz in full camo gear and face paint, hunting ducks.

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We talk a lot about the Iowa caucuses and look ahead to what's going to happen because voters there will be first up in choosing who they want to be president. The Iowa caucuses have been first since 1972.

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Over the last few days, the Democratic candidates for president have not stopped talking about Donald Trump. Even the country's top Democrat had a go at him. NPR's Sam Sanders has been tracking all of the trumping.

In a wide-ranging interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep, President Obama had some advice for college protesters across the country.

A day before the last Republican presidential debate of the year, two Republican candidates held rallies near the Las Vegas strip, less than a mile apart. In spite of their proximity, the events had almost nothing in common.

Marco Rubio was in a medium-size hotel ballroom, with a few hundred people in attendance. It seemed, at first, that Rubio might struggle to fill the room, as supporters came in slowly. But fill it did.

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And tonight, we'll be hearing from Republican presidential candidates debating in Las Vegas. Two of them held rallies ahead of this last Republican debate of the year. NPR's Sam Sanders has that story.

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Presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont took a walking tour Tuesday of Sandtown, the Baltimore neighborhood rocked by riots after the death of Freddie Gray while in police custody earlier this year. But perhaps the most newsworthy comments came from Sanders and his press secretary, Symone Sanders (no relation), after the tour was complete.

As soon as Donald Trump announced that he'd gained the endorsement of 100 black ministers from across the country on Monday, there were skeptics.

The claim came just days after the presidential candidate said of an African-American Black Lives Matter protester who was beaten up at a Trump event, "Maybe he deserved to be roughed up."

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Donald Trump held a meeting with black pastors today in New York. The event was initially billed by the Trump campaign as an endorsement. But NPR's Sam Sanders says that those who were invited had other ideas.

Rain couldn't keep away hundreds of Georgetown University students on Thursday who waited hours outside for a chance to hear Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders explain his support for socialism.

The fervor to see the Vermont independent senator's major address wasn't surprising: Research shows that young people are much more likely than older people to support socialism.

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Socialism can mean different things to different people, and as NPR's Sam Sanders reports, that perception depends a lot on your age.

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SAM SANDERS, BYLINE: I'm Sam Sanders in Lynchburg, Va., with Ben Carson. The candidate spoke this morning at the Christian Liberty University. For Carson, it was a safe space. Former prisoner of war George Rodgers introduced him this way.

Jeb Bush's presidential campaign is attempting a reset of sorts. Lackluster debate performances, low poll numbers, a mounting number of gaffes on the trail, and accusations — from Donald Trump specifically — that he's low-energy have left him in a rut.

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Neurosurgeon Ben Carson is running for president, and he's also selling his new book. And as NPR's Sam Sanders reports, sometimes the line between book tour and campaign gets a little blurry.

A few hours before the start of this week's Democratic presidential debate in Las Vegas, the tweets started to pour in.

They all had the same, strange hashtag: #FeelTheChafe, a reference to the #FeelTheBern Bernie Sanders supporters were using to rally around their candidate. But it had a snarky twist for Lincoln Chafee, the former Rhode Island governor and senator, who's been, so far, a much less popular presidential candidate.

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A lot of politicians are being asked what to do about gun violence after a gunman killed nine people in Oregon last week. And the answers from the large field of Republican candidates for president are varied. NPR's Sam Sanders reports.

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