Sarah McCammon

Sarah McCammon worked for Iowa Public Radio as Morning Edition Host from January 2010 until December 2013.

White evangelicals are reliable Republican voters. They also have a long history of demanding that politicians exemplify character and morality in public life.

So for many, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump presents a moral dilemma.

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Donald Trump is also trying to expand his reach into states that tend to go blue. He's in Michigan today. NPR's Sarah McCammon is traveling with the Trump campaign, and she's on the line from Warren, Mich. Hi, Sarah.

SARAH MCCAMMON, BYLINE: Hi, Ari.

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Donald Trump laid out his closing pitch to voters on Saturday in Pennsylvania, a battleground state that is home to many actual battlegrounds.

"It's my privilege to be here in Gettysburg, hallowed ground where so many lives were given," Trump said.

Trump reiterated the major themes of his campaign, like cracking down on illegal immigration. He also promised to sue women who've come forward to accuse him of unwanted sexual contact. But first, he drew a parallel to the state of the nation during the Civil War.

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Brent Harger of Washoe County, Nev., says he has always voted, but until this year, he'd never really gotten involved in politics.

"I've always been told my voice means nothing. I don't believe that," Harger says. "And there's a lot of people that are scared to even say anything today because they don't think their voice means anything."

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Liberty University is a place where Donald Trump still has a lot of support.

But his running mate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, is the one who seems naturally at home at the Virginia college, in a way the flamboyant New York real estate developer is not.

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Donald Trump declared "the shackles have been taken off me" Tuesday morning on Twitter.

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Donald Trump has apologized for his vulgar comments about women that were revealed in a recording obtained by the Washington Post on Friday.

Donald Trump's campaign is responding to a New York Times report that the real estate mogul claimed hundreds of millions of dollars in losses on tax returns in 1995 — an amount that could have allowed him to legally avoid paying income taxes for many years.

The 1995 tax records obtained by the newspaper show Trump as having reported a $916 million loss on personal income tax returns during that year.

If Donald Trump dredges up former President Bill Clinton's history of extramarital affairs to use it against his Democratic rival, it could be a risky move for the GOP nominee amid the new storm he stoked over his own comments about and treatment of women.

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When in North Carolina, never pass up barbecue and cherry cobbler.

That was Donald Trump's approach between campaign rallies in the battleground state on Tuesday. The Republican nominee stopped for lunch and a few handshakes at Stamey's Barbecue in Greensboro.

Talking about God is pretty standard for American politicians. But a line that has been popping up often in Donald Trump's recent campaign speeches seems to go further.

At a recent gathering of conservative Christians in Washington, D.C., Trump promised that if he is elected president, "we will be one American nation." The Republican nominee quoted the Bible and spelled out his vision for American unity:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Donald Trump has just finished up an event here in Washington, D.C., where he seemed to answer a question that has been on the minds of a lot of people for the last 24 hours or so. Let's listen to what he had to say.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Presidential candidates deliver hundreds of stump speeches over the course of their campaigns. This week, we're looking closely to the messages that the two major-party candidates deliver in city after city.

In his stump speech, Donald Trump brings the energy and spends a lot of time talking about core issues like illegal immigration and trade as well as attacking the media and hitting Hillary Clinton, especially over her emails. And there's plenty of ad-libbing, especially about what's in the news.

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