Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

China has sent patrol boats to the vicinity of a group of disputed islands to assert its "undisputed sovereignty" against a move by Japan to nationalize the chain claimed by both countries, Chinese state media says.

UPDATE at 9:00 ET:

President Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama and White House staffers observed a moment of silence on the White House South Lawn to remember the nearly 3,000 people killed in terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.

After the silence, three bell tolls were struck and a bugler played taps.

Here's our earlier post:

Ceremonies to commemorate the nearly 3,000 people killed 11 years ago today in the worst-ever terrorist attacks on U.S. soil are decidedly lower key this time around.

Striking teachers in Chicago manned the picket lines for a second day today as parents again scrambled to occupy their stay-at-home kids.

Some 350,000 of the district's students are locked out of their classrooms because city officials and thousands of teachers represented by the Chicago Teachers Union have yet to reach a contract. The strike is the first by public school teachers in the Chicago in 25 years.

One way to study distant Mars is to look for analogues here on Earth.

After all, the two worlds are similar in many ways — they both are what planetary astronomers called "rocky" (as opposed to gaseous Jupiter or Saturn), and they both have water.

Al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula's second-in-command has been killed in Yemen, a government website reports.

Saudi national Saeed al-Shehri was killed in the Hadramawt area of southern Yemen along with six other militants, according to the website and ministry of defense officials quoted by the BBC.

President Obama edged out Mitt Romney in the all-important quest for campaign cash in the crucial final weeks ahead of the Nov. 6 election.

The president and the Democratic National Committee raised $114 million last month, versus Romney and the Republican National Committee's take of $111 million.

Remember the dark days of 2008 when insurer American International Group Inc., better known as AIG, nearly collapsed under the weight of the mortgage crisis before Washington rode to the rescue to the tune of $182 billion?

Then there was the public outrage when AIG executives got millions in bonuses after receiving the largest of all of the Wall Street bailouts.

Since then, the New York-based insurance giant has been essentially a government-owned enterprise, with Uncle Sam holding a controlling share.

Teachers in Chicago walked off the job Monday after contract negotiations fell through, leaving 400,000 students in the nation's third-largest district shut out of their classrooms.

Contract talks broke down late last night, and by Monday morning Chicago public school teachers, many wearing red T-shirts and carrying signs, were picketing around the city for the first time in a quarter-century.

It wasn't what President Obama was hoping for: another disappointing jobs report the morning after he accepted the Democratic nomination and asked Americans to stay the course.

The U.S. economy added just 96,000 jobs last month, according to the Labor Department, and a drop in the unemployment rate to 8.1 percent was mostly due to people giving up on job searches.

Isaac might not be in the same league as Hurricane Katrina seven years ago, but the latest storm to batter Louisiana's Gulf Coast is punching above its weight class in more ways than one, scientists say.

The Latest at 10:20 p.m. ET. More Than 650,000 Power Outages In La.

That tidbit emerged in a letter from gov. Bobby Jindal to President Obama in which he requested expedited major disaster declaration for the state as a result of damage caused by Isaac.

Here's more from the letter:

There are lots of ways to get to 270 and they don't all involve Florida's 29 electoral votes, according to Rich Beeson, the national political director for the Mitt Romney Campaign.

Beeson, speaking with Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep on Tuesday, says the Sunshine State would be nice to have in the red column, but it's not a sine qua non for clinching victory in November.

South Carolina's voter ID law is in federal court this week, where state officials will try to defend it against a U.S. Justice Department finding that says the law would discriminate against blacks.

The law would require a photo identification as a prerequisite for voting.

While soon-to-be Hurricane Isaac isn't looking like another Katrina, the storm is expected to pick up steam as it heads toward a landfall, conjuring up powerful memories of the disaster seven years ago.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu declared a state of emergency for New Orleans on Sunday, warning residents to "think about how you will spend time without power or water."

Good morning - so far today, we're following these stories:

-- Tropical Storm Isaac Strengthens At It Heads Toward Louisiana

-- Taliban Blamed For Killing 17 Partygoers

And here are more early stories:

Seventeen people at a party in southern Afghanistan were attacked and beheaded by insurgents, officials said Monday.

The civilians were apparently targeted because they had "flouted the extreme brand of Islam embraced by the militants," The Associated Press reports. A government spokesman blamed the Taliban.

The news agency quoted a district government chief as saying the party involving music and dancing, activities shunned by the Taliban.

UPDATE at 2:40 ET:


Here's the National Hurricane Center's update at 1:00 CDT on Monday:

...HEAVY RAINS AND FLOODING AFFECTING THE FLORIDA EAST COAST... SIGNIFICANT STORM SURGE THREAT EXPECTED FOR THE NORTHERN GULF COAST...

The storm surge for south-central Louisiana was expected to be 3 to 6 feet, the NHC said.

The recent outbreak of West Nile virus in the Dallas area has led to a new round of large-scale spraying for mosquitoes — a method of treating outbreaks that has generations of success, and even nostalgia, behind it.

Although the overall mosquito-killing strategy has changed little since the days when it was pioneered during construction of the Panama Canal a century ago, the chemicals used have become much safer for everything and everyone involved, save the mosquitoes, experts say.

As Sikhism spread far and wide in the past century, it has been no stranger to discrimination and violence.

Syria's recently appointed prime minister has defected to Jordan and joined the opposition to President Bashar Assad, the highest-level departure to date from the embattled regime.

Prime Minister Riyad Hijab fled with his family just two months after assuming his post in the Cabinet. In a statement read to Al-Jazeera television, Hijab rejected a claim from Syrian state media that he had been fired.

The latest developments related to Sunday's shooting at a Sikh temple in Oak Creek, Wis., in which six people were killed and three injured before, authorities say, the gunman was killed by police:

Update at 3:47 p.m. ET. Obama Says Events Should Lead To "Soul Searching":

President Obama gave televised statements about the shooting which he called "terrible, tragic."

Taxes may be certain, but growth and job creation aren't.

As the U.S. edges closer to a year-end "fiscal cliff," Democrats and Republicans haven't budged in their fight over expiring tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans — and how best to help the middle class and get the country back to work.

The sanctions slapped on Penn State football in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal charter a new territory in punishment by the NCAA, a sports author said today.

"I think it is unprecedented in terms of taking away wins. That's a huge blow," says Ted Kluck, author of several books on sports, including Game Time: Inside College Football.

The shooting spree that killed at least 12 people and wounded dozens more at a movie theater in a Denver suburb Friday is one of a number of violent episodes in Colorado in recent years.

An Akron, Ohio, restaurant owner who served President Obama a breakfast of bacon, eggs and toast this morning died just a few hours later of natural causes.

The Akron Beacon Journal reported that Josephine "Ann" Harris, 70, complained of fatigue and a tingling sensation before she died on Friday.

According to the paper:

Washington and Wisconsin have been granted waivers from standards related to the federal No Child Left Behind program, bringing to more than half the number of states with such exemptions.

The Department of Education began granting waivers in February, and so far 26 states have received them in exchange for promises to improve the way they prepare and evaluate students. Ten more states have applied.

Yahoo and Facebook have agreed to re-sheath their patent swords and play nice — at least for now.

The two companies have struck a broad advertising partnership as part of a deal to end a patent dispute, Kara Swisher reports on the technology blog All Things Digital, quoting "sources close to the situation."

Beware of "Malware Monday." But don't be too concerned.

If you're unlucky enough to own a PC that's been infected by the DNSChanger malware (and still hasn't been disinfected), you could be out of luck when you try to connect to your ISP on Monday. Estimates vary about the number of computers infected. In the U.S., we're seeing anything from about 45,000 to 64,000, and somewhere in the neighborhood of a quarter-million worldwide.

Update at 1:50 p.m. EST:

Andy Murray has defeated Jo-Wilfried Tsonga to reach the men's final at Wimbledon, becoming the first British man in 74 years to have a shot at winning tennis' oldest and most prestigious trophy.

Murray beat Tsonga 6-3, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5.

Murray will face Roger Federer in the final.

Brits, who anxiously watched the tense match, exploded in rejoicing.

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