Steve Inskeep

We trust that Oakland Raiders fans had a pleasant time last night.

They had a big game against Kansas City.

Sportswriter Jimmy Durkin was among Raiders fans on a flight to the game.

And he reports what happened: the crew made an announcement that on this not-so-long flight, passengers consumed all the booze.

They drank the plane dry.

Hopefully the plane was re-stocked in time for the return flight, since the Raiders lost last night 21-to-13.

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We have a global conversation this morning about resistance to globalization. NPR's Frank Langfitt is in North East England in the U.K., which voted this year to leave the European Union. Hi, Frank.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

Never mind legalizing pot. Kokomo, Ind., has legalized pinball.

The city council ended a ban that stretches back to 1955.

Back then, the council said pinball worked against "peace and good order."

Wives complained about husbands who gambled away their entire paychecks.

In more recent times, the ban seems to have been ignored.

At last the city council has revoked it, taking its chances on keeping the peace.

The year is not quite over, but we know the top selling CD of 2016.

It's not by Beyonce ... but by Mozart.

Billboard reports that 1.25 million CDs in a Mozart box set have been sold.

One clarification: Only a few thousand people bought the Mozart box set.

Billboard counts the different CDs in a box set as separate sales.

So when you put 225 CDs in a box set, the math almost guarantees a smash hit.

You can re-enact that scene in the old movie Christmas Vacation.

A family goes into a forest and cuts down a ridiculously tall tree.

The U.S. Forest Service is selling Christmas tree removal permits for $5 in the Green Mountain National Forest of Vermont.

You go into the forest. You cut down the tree yourself. There's only one catch: the tree you choose cannot be more than 20 feet tall.

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The presidential election looks very different from the heights of the economy than it does from its depths.

In North Carolina, rural Bertie County, the poorest in the state, and tech hub Wake County, the most prosperous, are less than two hours apart by car in this important presidential swing state. And yet they could almost be on opposite sides of the world. Charlotte Gilliam, a resident of Bertie, says the difference between there and Wake is "from here to China."

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Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump this week visited Florida, a vitally important battleground state, to fight the campaign's final rounds.

To get an up-close look, NPR went to Tampa for a Trump rally on Monday and the next day, went to one for Clinton in Broward County in South Florida. For each rally, we met with voters who'd lined up hours early — then we passed through the Secret Service checkpoint and settled in for the show. Each rally sent many messages, both intended and unintended, and helped paint a stark portrait of two very different candidates.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Jimmy and Dami Arno of the Atlanta suburb of Lawrenceville, Ga., say the country is in trouble. "I know that we were a whole lot further along racially 8 years ago than we are today," Jimmy says.

They plan on voting for Donald Trump this November.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep in Atlanta, the capital of Georgia, one of the divided states, where we stood on the porch of a house on Sunday.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

I'm Steve Inskeep in Atlanta.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene in Washington, D.C.

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Retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn has been an outspoken supporter of Donald Trump, offering some credibility to the foreign policy newcomer.

But on a key priority of the GOP presidential nominee — banning travel to the United States from areas affected by terrorism — Flynn acknowledged some of Trump's ideas are "not workable."

In a Morning Edition interview, NPR's Steve Inskeep asked Flynn, "In the end do we have here a laudable effort to protect the United States from all harm that is just not workable at all?"

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Surely one of the hardest jobs at the Republican convention belongs to House Speaker Paul Ryan, who will preside over it.

How has America changed after eight tumultuous years under President Obama?

President Obama says he agrees with Donald Trump on one thing: There are "parallels" between the U.S. election and the United Kingdom's dramatic vote to leave the European Union.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

"Who still supports Andrew Jackson?"

An NPR colleague posed that question Thursday morning after news broke that Jackson, or at least his image, will share the $20 bill with Harriet Tubman. Tubman, in fact, would be the one on the front of the bill; Jackson would ride in back. News items described this Treasury Department decision in a way that made Jackson seem impossible to support: A slave-owning president was being shoved aside in favor of a heroic escaped slave.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam says he is deciding whether to sign legislation that would allow therapists to refuse service based on religious objections.

In an interview with NPR's Morning Edition, he said he is "talking to a lot of folks to get some input" on the bill and that he had boiled his thinking down to this central question: whether therapists could truly leave their values out of their work.

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