Taylor Quimby

Senior Producer, Word of Mouth|Outside/In

Taylor Quimby started his career in radio in 2010 as a part-time board operator for NHPR. As Producer of Word of Mouth, he cultivates ideas, writes and produces segments, shapes the sound of the program, and sifts through endless emails. Taylor also lends his voice to the show as an occasional substitute host and contributor, and is responsible for the blog Abbrev. Movie Reviews.

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Taylor Quimby

If you subscribe to Netflix Instant you already know that its selection is vast, but finding something you really want to watch can still be a challenge.  There are dozens of new titles added every month, and although  many of them aren't exactly fresh, there's still plenty worth watching, even if it is for the second time. Here are a few of the best Netflix offerings for June, both new and old.

Orange is The New Black: Season 2

Netflix may not have a lot of new movies to offer this month, and I'll get to that in a bit, but they're making up for it by serving up the highly-anticipated second season of their original show, Orange is the New Black.  Available June 6th.

Ken Fager, courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons

Henry River Mill Village in North Carolina was just another American ghost town - abandoned, except for the occasional passing tourist or history buff.  That is, until it was transformed into 'District 12' - the oppressed coal-mining community from the film adaptation of Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games.

Taylor Quimby for NHPR

For the parents of young children, getting out to a nice restaurant can require some tricky logistics.   Between babysitters, winter colds, and sheer exhaustion, it’s understandable when parents ditch romantic efforts in lieu of pajamas and another night of bad TV. But why not have a date night from the comfort of home?  My wife Tiffany and I discovered a way to enjoy the both of best worlds…sort of.

Want to know more about Plated, the service featured in this piece? Here's their website. 

Taylor Quimby

While working on an upcoming story, producer Taylor Quimby got this audio of his dog, Angel-Rose, begging for attention.  He thinks she sounds like a tent zipper.  What do you think?

Tiffany Quimby

The New England Reptile Expo falls somewhere between a trade show and a petting zoo. Displayed across the length of the Radisson Expo Center are thousands of geckos, iguanas, turtles, frogs, and of course, snakes.  Lots and lots of snakes. Indiana Jones would be freaking out.

Taylor Quimby (weeping out of frame)

Can't help singing along to your favorite sad songs in the shower, the car, or from the middle of a crowded street?  Looking for something to help you dwell on your latest breakup, or summon your personal demons?  Want to put something on the stereo that will dull your roomate's perversely happy attitude?  Word of Mouth has the playlist for you. 

Help Us Name Our Children's Song!

Jan 14, 2014
Zach Nugent

Our interview with Chris Ballew, also known as Caspar Babypants (also the frontman for the band The Presidents of The United States of America!) made us want to try and write a children's song.  SO WE DID! But we need your help naming it.

For our roundtable discussion on the worst public apologies of 2013, click on the link below under "Related Content".

Look back at 2013, and it's clear there are lots of ways of messing up the phrase "I'm sorry".  For example, Paula Deen's first apology for using the "n-word"  basically attributed her use of racist language to being raised under segregation. Her second apology was just plain weird.

NHPR

As we look back at 2013, we’re struck by the number of mishaps made by politicians, celebrities, athletes and companies…followed of course, by the oh-so-heartfelt public apology. Word of Mouth's senior producer Maureen McMurray and producer Taylor Quimby join Virginia Prescott to talk about the year of saying sorry…or in some cases, the year of the non-apology.

Logan Shannon/Sara Plourde / NHPR

It’s the season for giving back and there are plenty of opportunities to volunteer at soup kitchens, at clinics and hospitals, or swinging a Christmas bell for the Salvation Army … but what about those volunteer opportunities that fly under the radar?  In New Hampshire, a number of brave and selfless volunteers tackle a task most people dread…filing taxes.

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, ‘tis the season for awkward dinners with your loved ones’ parents. It’s no secret that navigating your relationship with your in-laws can feel like walking through a minefield, but a new study suggests that keeping close to them is a sign of a healthy marriage – for some. According to Dr. Terri Orbuch, men who get close to their in-laws within a year are 20% less likely to go through divorce later in life, but women who do the same are 20% more likely to split with their husbands down the road.

Dr. Terri Orbuch is a professor of sociology and a regular contributor to the Huffington Post, where she’s known as “The Love Doctor.” This year, she published a 26-year study looking at love in relation to the in-laws.

Courtesy Tim Mitsopoulos

On September 15th, 2008, the financial services firm Lehman Brothers filed for Chapter 11.  The subprime mortgage crisis had been percolating for months by then, as had a global economic decline – but the bankruptcy of the nation’s fourth largest investment bank panicked Wall Street, evaporating liquidity markets, sending the economy sharply downward, and sparking the worst global recession since World War II – a crisis from which the world’s economy is still recovering.

twaffles via Flickr Creative Commons

A full decade into the drone war in the Middle East, we’re still asking questions: what does an unmanned military mean for the future of warfare?  Who chooses who lives and who dies? What does it mean to pull the trigger on a target half a world away?

And what is like being a veteran of the drone war?

Matthew Power is a freelance print and radio journalist and a contributor to GQ Magazine, where he wrote a profile of former drone operator and Airman First Class Brandon Bryant.

Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

This Saturday, the Metropolitan Opera’s “Live in HD” series will broadcast worldwide. The live performance will be streaming to more than 700 theaters in the United States, seven of which are right here in New Hampshire.  Starring in the opera is soprano Patricia Racette of Manchester, New Hampshire.

alliance1911 via Flickr Creative Commons

As Instagram passes its third birthday, a small but growing community of users are beginning to utilize the website for the private exchange of goods. Two million of the site’s annual photo uploads are items being put up for sale, with the actual negotiations taking place via comment threads and private messages.

Among the many items being legally sold through Instagram are firearms.  Brian Ries is Senior Social Media Editor at The Daily Beast and joins us to explain.

via Knack.it

There’s been a lot of fuss made in recent years over the increasing “gamification” of everyday life – that is, the use of game mechanics in unusual settings like personal fitness, or in schools – where the incentive to get points or awards might have more motivational power than getting good grades, or dropping a dress size. In the workplace, companies like Cold Stone Creamery and the Miller Brewing have starting using video games to train fresh hires – and a recent study by the University of Colorado found that employees trained using video games did their jobs better, and retained information longer than those who were instructed by more conventional methods. One company thinks video games can play a role in businesses even earlier – before an employee has even been hired.

sheeshoo via Flickr Creative Commons

Whether it's a blinking laser gun, a noisy video game, or a robot doll that cries real tears, chances are this year's biggest selling holiday toys will be high-tech, battery operated, and chock full of bells and whistles.

Fighting back against the trend toward bright, noisy toys is Thierry Bourret of the toy company Asobi and founder of Slow Toy Movement, a website dedicated to promoting toys that educate and engage without plastic or power sources. Later this month, he will be announcing the winners of the 2nd annual Slow Toy Awards, and joins us for a preview. 

dimmerswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

Congressional approval rating hit a new now of 10.5 percent this week. If you’ve found yourself yelling at the radio and TV news coverage of the government shutdown and plotting revenge at the next election, you may not have to wait until 2014.

Last month, two of Colorado’s Democratic state senators became targets of a successful recall after voting for more restrictive gun legislation, adding to the increasing number of recall campaigns launched over the past two years. 

Seth Masket is a political scientist at the University of Denver, and a regular contributor to Pacific Standard.  He spoke with us about his article “The Recall is the New Normal”. 

Many of you called our Breaking Bad Hotline to let us know how you felt after the credits rolled on the finale. Here are just a few of the messages you left for us...and we've made them SPOILER FREE!

Just remember...WE'RE the ones who knock! Or something.

And if you're not ready to let go of our favorite meth cooks yet, check out some of our favorite 'Breaking Bad' memes:

'Breaking Bad' theme, played on meth lab equipment:

Leo Reynolds via flickr Creative Commons

Word of Mouth's Saturday show is everything you've come to expect from the public radio masterminds at WOM Inc.: you'll laugh, you'll cry, you'll be compelled to listen twice. This week's show features our own Taylor Quimby working the controls, giving the lovely Virginia Prescott a well deserved vacation from our little radio factory:

warriorwoman531 via Flickr Creative Commons

In 1975, Boston firefighters battled more than 400 blazes. Last year, there were only forty. That 90 percent drop reflects a nationwide victory in the crusade against fires, but even as America’s blazes burn out, the number of career firefighters per capita remains relatively unchanged.  

Leon Neyfakh is Ideas reporter for The Boston Globe. 

Curtis Gregory Perry via Flickr Creative Commons

Activism and innovation among Greeks started long before that country's debt crisis. In 2002, an Athens community fed up by slow and expensive service set up its own private internet. More than 1000 members of the Athens Wireless Metropolitan Network have free access to the web with speeds up to 30 times faster than commercial telecom carriers in the area. Given global concerns over the extent of the NSA’s surveillance program, independent “mesh” networks like the one in Athens could be adapted in other communities.

Joe Kloc is a reporter for The Daily Dot.

Photo Credit KP Tripathi, via Flickr Creative Commons

Congressional approval ratings are currently scraping the floor at about 15%. Voters report feeling frustrated at the dominance of political posturing over action. The exasperation has many wondering what our Legislature does exactly, and what in the Sam Hill are they talking about on the hill. A new web-based tool allows citizens to track congressional discussion, bills -- including state bills -- and regulations concerning issues they care about. From raw milk to education bills to campaign finance, Scout is designed to deliver real time results and encourage a more informed public. Our guest is Tom Lee the director of Sunlight Labs, the technical arm of the Sunlight Foundation – which works to make government transparent and accountable. He and his team helped develop Scout.

Rakka via Flickr Creative Commons

Celiac disease is a serious autoimmune disorder caused by a reaction to a gluten protein affecting one in one-hundred Americans. Despite the low percentage of those intolerant to wheat products, more people are experimenting with the anti-gluten diet and claim to enjoy health benefits like better skin and fewer allergies.  But is this fad just that...or is there some medical substance behind these claims?

danceforparkinsons.org

A few years after he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, writer, producer, and Public Radio host Dave Iverson learned that the Mark Morris Dance Group was teaching dance to people with Parkinson's at its Brooklyn headquarters.  Dave was touched - and produced a special on the dance group for the PBS Newshour and the PBS series Frontline.

More recently, he's rounded up a team of pros to film students preparing for their first public performance. He’s launched a Kickstarter project called “Capturing Grace" to finish the film.

Also joining us is David Levanthal – who until recently was one of the Mark Morris Dance Group’s most celebrated dancers. He’s now focusing entirely on dance for PD, the program working with Parkinson’s patients.

A couple weeks ago the Associated Press reported that the Department of Agriculture was dropping new vanilla-flavored rabies vaccines by airplane over New Hampshire forests as part of a five-state pilot study. Okay, if that sounds a little strange to you, get this: apparently the government has been distributing rabies vaccines by plane for over fifteen years. The story piqued the interest of NHPR environmental reporter Sam Evans-Brown, so he did some digging and is here to tell us more.

Don Pettit

NASA’s Don Pettit has been back from his last mission aboard the International Space Station for over a year, but his blog “Letters to Earth” remains one of the most fascinating and profound windows into the creative and emotional life of an astronaut.  While in space he penned and published poetry, An Astronaut’s Guide to Space Etiquette, and the series, “Diary of a Space Zucchini”, which detailed life on the ISS from the unusual perspective of a se

Farming...In Space!

Sep 16, 2013
Courtesy NASA.gov

If you think there are too many food deserts in cities across the United States, try finding some fresh produce in outer space.  Naturally, NASA makes sure astronauts living on the International Space Station don’t go hungry, but since it costs about $10,000 to send a single pound of food to the I.S.S., you can bet they don’t see a lot of leafy greens.

That cost is just one reason growing fresh food in outer space is a crucial step in the future of manned space exploration.  Jesse Hirsch is a staff writer for Modern Farmer, where you can find his article, “Space Farming: The Final Frontier”. 

ed_needs_a_bicycle via Flickr Creative Commons

When was the last time you read a book? Not for work, not a kid’s bedtime story, but a real honest to goodness book, just for the pleasure of reading?

If you sheepishly answered, "more than a year ago," you’re not alone. A recent survey puts the number of Americans who have failed to crack a spine in more than a year at one in four. While new technological distractions have certainly cut into our reading time, our next guest would also like to blame the Sisyphean task of merely trying to choose a book that’s worthy of reading. His solution? Authors should take a break from writing to give readers a chance to catch up.

Colin Robinson is a co-founder of the New York based independent publisher OR.

Daniel Sylvester Hurd via Flickr Creative Commons

The Affordable Care Act has gotten its fair share of media coverage since passing in December of 2009, but much of the discussion has focused the behemoth law’s more controversial aspects, like the individual mandate and Medicaid expansion.  One under-discussed provision of the A.C.A. is called “The Sunshine Act.” It's designed to reveal the substantial fees and gifts doctors receive from pharmaceutical and medical device companies.

Joining me to discuss the provision and what it will mean for doctors and companies is healthcare reporter for the Wall Street Journal Peter Loftus, as well as physician and author Danielle Ofri, who writes about medicine and the doctor-patient connection for The New York Times.

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