10.21.14: The Rise Of Vaping, Best & Worst Pumpkin Beers, & Old Cookbooks

Oct 21, 2014

Credit RJ Ursua via flickr Creative Commons

According to Wells-Fargo, the e-cigarette market is an estimated 2.5 billion dollar industry and is projected to reach 10 billion dollars in the next 3 years. On Today’s show, we uncover the surprisingly complex vaping scene.

Then, from gum drop bread to the rib sticker, we get nostalgic for the locally-produced-independently-published cookbook. Plus, a look at the beer industry’s dangerous love affair with pumpkin-spice.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

Right to Vape

Below is a video of a cloud chaser. Skip to 6:26 to see the massive cloud of vape.

'The Public Radio' Radio

  • Spencer Wright is a product designer and co-creator of ‘The Public Radio’, a radio that gets pre-tuned to your favorite station. The campaign was launched on Kickstarter last month and ends tonight at 10:41 pm eastern time.


Machiavelli

  • Natalie Jones examines the influence of the Italian political philosopher on fictional mafia bosses like Tony Soprano and real-life musicians like Tupac Shakur.
  • You can listen to the story at PRX.org.

The Best & Worst Pumpkin Beers

  • Josh Jackson is co-founder and editor in chief of Paste Magazine, Jim Vorel is news editor there – together they have made sampling seasonal brews a tradition – and they published their 4th annual list of the best and worst pumpkin ales earlier this month.
  • Every year the selection of pumpkin flavored products seems to multiply, exponentially. We set out to create a list of pumpkin flavored food we hope never sees the light of day. Check it out here ----> Things That Should Never Get Pumpkin Spiced.

Old Cookbooks

  • Meg Favreau writes the Forgotten Foods column for the online magazine Table Matters.  She’s amassed a small collection of these locally-produced cookbooks, including a couple from New Hampshire’s North Country, where she grew up.

The Kitchen Sisters: Weenie Royale

  • After Pearl Harbor, about 120,000 Japanese Americans were uprooted and forced to live for years in remote federal camps around the country. The Kitchen Sisters, producers Nikki Silva and Davia Nelson, explore the impact of the internment on Japanese cooking and culture in America in a story they call "Weenie Royale".
  • You can listen to the story and see photos here.