2.2.16: Introverted Teachers Burning Out, Cash 4 Your Warhol, & Spite Houses

Feb 2, 2016

Group learning and collaborative skills are status quo in today's classrooms - which can be tough on introverts, especially when they're the teacher.  On today’s show, the high burnout rate for introverted teachers.

Also, remember the days of The Shadow, and The Green Hornet? We'll hear about a live stage show that takes comic book radio drama to a new level.

And "Cash for Your Warhol",  the story of a fake business that became surprisingly real.

Listen to the full show:

Introverted Teachers are Getting Burned Out

Michael Godsey is a teacher based in San Luis Obispo, California, he's also contributing writer for The Atlantic, where he wrote about the high burnout rate for introverted teachers, and what a loss that is for solitary and withdrawn kids. "Why Introverted Teachers are Getting Burned Out"

Cash 4 Your Warhol

Geoff Hargadon is a conceptual artist, financial advisor, and the brains behind “Cash for Your Warhol.”

Related: "'Cash For Your Warhol' Project Takes Over Cambridge Storefront"

   

Spite Houses
The Skinny House in the North End of Boston is an extremely narrow four-story spite house reported by the Boston Globe as having the "uncontested distinction of being the narrowest house in Boston".
Credit Source: March 2008 photo by John Stephen Dwyer.

Patrick Sisson is editor at Curbed and wrote “Spite Houses: 12 Homes Created With Anger and Angst.”

Related: "Take a Peek Inside Boston's Legendary 'Skinny House'"

You can also rent the skinny house at VRBO.

  

Intergalactic Nemesis

Jason Neulander is the producer and director of the show, "Intergalactic Nemesis: Target Earth" a one-of-a-kind stage performance that's part sci-fi comic book and part live-action radio drama. It’s coming to the Redfern Arts Center at Keene State College on February 6th

The Cosmic Ray Catchers

Rays from outer space sound like science fiction. But in fact, hundreds of particles flung from outer space pass through our bodies every minute. They’re called cosmic rays and they shower every square foot of our atmosphere by the thousands every second. These particles come mostly from the sun and other stars in our galaxy. But some cosmic rays are immensely powerful and very rare. They seem to originate from beyond our galaxy.  For decades scientists have wondered where they're coming from – and what could possibly be hurling them at earth.  Now they're getting closer to finding out. Producer Ross Chambless brings us the story.

This production is part of the STEM Story Project -- distributed by PRX and made possible with funds from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

You can listen to this story again at PRX.org