North Country
11:15 am
Mon February 6, 2012

A Different View of Pakistan Comes to New Hampshire

Ayesha Khan says her documentary – Made in Pakistan – being shown late this week in Plymouth, Bethlehem and Concord tries to show Americans a different perspective on Pakistan than the one they typically get from watching the news.

That perspective comes from a look at the lives of four professionals, two men and two women.

They are described as an aspiring politician; a young mother, teacher and magazine editor; an event manager working in the fashion industry; and a lawyer and devout Muslim.

“It was really providing a window into Pakistan,” Khan said in an interview. “They are worried about their living, they are worried about their expenses, they are worried about maintaining their businesses. It really focuses on their day-to-day life and it really does shatter a lot of stereotypes, particularly about women in Pakistan.”

She says a common response from American audiences who’ve seen the film has been: ‘Oh, they are just like us.’”

Khan, the film’s executive producer and president of Indus Valley Productions, says the film is a documentary and there is no denying that there are serious problems in Pakistan.

“We are dealing with a lot of complex issues,” she said.

She says the film also raises the question of how Pakistan’s problems arose so a major issueis America’s relationship with Pakistan and what Pakistanis think about that relationship.

“They are really worried about this war on terror, which they do not see as their war and yet it is being played out in Pakistan,” she said.

The film is being shown with the help of The Arts Alliance of Northern New Hampshire and is part of the “Caravanserai: A place where cultures meet.”

The showings in Plymouth and Bethlehem are free.

On Thursday Feb. 9thMade in Pakistan will be shown at 7 p.m. at Plymouth State University, Boyd Hall, Room 001, 23 Highland Street.

On Friday, February 10th it will be shown at 7 p.m. at The White Mountain School, Great Hall, 371 West Farm Road, Bethlehem.

The film is 60 minutes long and will be followed by a question-and-answer discussion with Khan.

On Saturday, Feb. 11th Khan will be in Concord.

At 2:30 pm there will be “an informal discussion on international filmmaking and women in films with Ayesha Khan.”

It will be at the Pierce Room of the law offices of Gallagher, Callahan, and Gartrell, PC, 214 North Main Street, Concord.

At 7 p.m. Saturday “Made in Pakistan” will be shown at the Red River Theaters, 11 South Main Street in Concord. Admission is $10.